News Photos

08/21/2019 02 hours

  • 1/78   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Sony   Tom Holland   Venom   Matrix   Far From Home   Peter Parker   Uncle Ben   American Jews   Mister Bond   Jaylon Smith   Miles Morales   Andrew Garfield   Kevin Feige   The MCU   Stan Lee   Mount Rushmore   Brian Johnson   Night Monkey   Tobey Maguire   Game Informer   Larry King   Raimi   Aunt May   Disloyalty   Lana Wachowski   Mr. Stark   J.D. Davis   Did Texas   Revolutions   
  • 2/78   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/78   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/78   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/78   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/78   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/78   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/78   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/78   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/78   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/78   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/78   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/78   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/78   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/78   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 16/78   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 17/78   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 18/78   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 19/78   $700K for an apartment? The cost to solve the homeless crisis is soaring in Los Angeles
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    With thousands living on the streets, Los Angeles is spending lavishly to try to solve the problem. But, $320,000 a year for a toilet?

    With thousands living on the streets, Los Angeles is spending lavishly to try to solve the problem. But, $320,000 a year for a toilet?


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  • 20/78   Is BP a Buy?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The oil giant has a plan to prosper at lower oil prices.

    The oil giant has a plan to prosper at lower oil prices.


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  • 21/78   Why Coach and Kate Spade Are Having Such a Bad Year
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Parent company Tapestry’s stock has been torpedoed so far in 2019.

    Parent company Tapestry’s stock has been torpedoed so far in 2019.


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  • 22/78   Asia Stocks to Follow U.S. Lower; Treasuries Gain: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks in Asia looked set to decline after a weak U.S. session and a further move lower in Treasury yields as investors assessed the latest news on trade talks and awaited more clues on monetary policy.Futures fell in Japan, Hong Kong and Australia. The S&P 500 Index closed lower as U.S. President Donald Trump showed no urgency to resolve trade friction with China and renewed his call for a “big” Federal Reserve rate cut. Benchmark 10-year yields declined while the dollar retreated from this year’s high. Italian bonds jumped as Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte resigned, with the prospect of an alternative coalition still on the table.Just a day after markets cheered progress on trade negotiations, investors took a more cautious approach. Trump’s top economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, speaks with business leaders this week amid concerns about a recession, the trade war and whipsawing markets. Fed minutes are due Wednesday and though they’re outdated given recent market turmoil and likely to be overshadowed by Jerome Powell’s imminent address at Jackson Hole, they may provide clarity on the economic outlook that would push officials to keep lowering rates.“The global economy is slowing, monetary policy has limits and we’re likely not going to pivot soon enough to fiscal policy,” Mark Kiesel, chief investment officer of global credit at Pacific Investment Management Co., told Bloomberg TV. “The reality is that risks have increased a lot.”Elsewhere, oil fluctuated. Gold advanced for the first time in three days.Here are some notable events coming up:Minutes of the Fed’s July meeting will provide details on the discussions leading to the first interest-rate cut in a decade when they are released on Wednesday.Germany will sell a 30-year bond at a 0% coupon for the first time on Wednesday, in a flurry of debt sales in the next two weeks offering negative rates.Thursday brings the Bank Indonesia rate decision and press conference with Governor Perry Warjiyo.Flash PMIs are due for the euro area on Thursday.Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank hosts its annual central banking symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, starting Thursday. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will give remarks on Friday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 were flat as of 7:50 a.m. in Tokyo. The underlying gauge fell 0.8% Tuesday.Futures on Japan’s Nikkei 225 declined 0.9% in Singapore.Hang Seng Index futures earlier dipped 0.5%.Futures on Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index lost 0.7%.CurrenciesThe yen held at 106.27 per dollar.The offshore yuan was steady at 7.0706 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed.The euro bought $1.1100, little changed.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries slid five basis points to 1.56%.Australia’s 10-year yield declined two basis points to 0.92%.Germany’s 10-year yield fell four basis points to -0.69%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was flat at $56.12 a barrel.Gold held at $1,506.59 an ounce.\--With assistance from Rita Nazareth and Sarah Ponczek.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Andreea PapucFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks in Asia looked set to decline after a weak U.S. session and a further move lower in Treasury yields as investors assessed the latest news on trade talks and awaited more clues on monetary policy.Futures fell in Japan, Hong Kong and Australia. The S&P 500 Index closed lower as U.S. President Donald Trump showed no urgency to resolve trade friction with China and renewed his call for a “big” Federal Reserve rate cut. Benchmark 10-year yields declined while the dollar retreated from this year’s high. Italian bonds jumped as Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte resigned, with the prospect of an alternative coalition still on the table.Just a day after markets cheered progress on trade negotiations, investors took a more cautious approach. Trump’s top economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, speaks with business leaders this week amid concerns about a recession, the trade war and whipsawing markets. Fed minutes are due Wednesday and though they’re outdated given recent market turmoil and likely to be overshadowed by Jerome Powell’s imminent address at Jackson Hole, they may provide clarity on the economic outlook that would push officials to keep lowering rates.“The global economy is slowing, monetary policy has limits and we’re likely not going to pivot soon enough to fiscal policy,” Mark Kiesel, chief investment officer of global credit at Pacific Investment Management Co., told Bloomberg TV. “The reality is that risks have increased a lot.”Elsewhere, oil fluctuated. Gold advanced for the first time in three days.Here are some notable events coming up:Minutes of the Fed’s July meeting will provide details on the discussions leading to the first interest-rate cut in a decade when they are released on Wednesday.Germany will sell a 30-year bond at a 0% coupon for the first time on Wednesday, in a flurry of debt sales in the next two weeks offering negative rates.Thursday brings the Bank Indonesia rate decision and press conference with Governor Perry Warjiyo.Flash PMIs are due for the euro area on Thursday.Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank hosts its annual central banking symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, starting Thursday. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will give remarks on Friday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 were flat as of 7:50 a.m. in Tokyo. The underlying gauge fell 0.8% Tuesday.Futures on Japan’s Nikkei 225 declined 0.9% in Singapore.Hang Seng Index futures earlier dipped 0.5%.Futures on Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index lost 0.7%.CurrenciesThe yen held at 106.27 per dollar.The offshore yuan was steady at 7.0706 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed.The euro bought $1.1100, little changed.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries slid five basis points to 1.56%.Australia’s 10-year yield declined two basis points to 0.92%.Germany’s 10-year yield fell four basis points to -0.69%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was flat at $56.12 a barrel.Gold held at $1,506.59 an ounce.\--With assistance from Rita Nazareth and Sarah Ponczek.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Andreea PapucFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 23/78   Trump Says More Tax Cuts Are on the Table
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump said Tuesday that his administration is considering a push to cut the payroll and capital gains taxes, but he insisted that such moves aren’t imminent and would not come as the result of rising recession fears.“I’ve been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time,” he said. “Whether or not we do it now, it’s not being done because of recession.”Mixed messages: Trump and others in the administration have been sending conflicting signals regarding the economy and potential measures to prevent a recession. While they’ve publicly touted an ongoing boom, they’ve reportedly been scrambling behind the scenes for ways to bolster business and consumer spending. The New York Times reported that, driven by concerns about the economy ahead of the 2020 elections, the White House was also considering reversing some of the president’s tariffs.In response to a Washington Post report Monday evening that senior officials had held early discussions about a potential payroll tax cut, the White House said that the idea “is not something under consideration at this time.” White House spokesman Hogan Gidley then told Fox News on Tuesday morning that officials had “talked about all types of options,” adding that the administration is “always looking to give people back their hard-earned money and that’s what the conversation was about.”Trump himself has touted the strength of the economy in recent days while simultaneously calling on the Federal Reserve and its chairman, Jerome Powell, to slash interest rates by a full percentage point — the kind of move the central bank might take in response to a pronounced economic downturn.On Tuesday, Trump told reporters that the economy is “doing fantastically” and that “we’re very far” from a recession. But he again pressed the Fed to “be proactive” by slashing interest rates and resuming the extraordinary “quantitative easing” it undertook to inject more money into the economy during the last downturn.A payroll tax cut is highly unlikely: Unless the economy takes a severe turn for the worse, a payroll tax cut is only slightly more probable than the U.S. buying Greenland. It would require congressional approval, and while Democrats have in the past supported payroll tax cuts more than Republicans, they might see a push at this point as being driven more by election politics than economic necessity.The cost would likely be an issue for some lawmakers as well. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that a temporary cut in the employee-side payroll tax would cost $70 to $75 billion a year in lost revenue for every percentage point reduction. Lawmakers would have to decide whether that revenue loss would hit the Treasury or the Social Security Trust Fund.And it might not do much anyway: The Obama administration cut the payroll tax for employees in 2011 and 2012, lowering the rate from 6.2% to 4.2% as part of an effort to stimulate the economy in the wake of the Great Recession. Bloomberg’s Laura Davison reports that those cuts “reduced the tax burden for a median-income family by about $996, according to Politifact. Spread over a twice-a-month pay days, that meant about $41.50 extra in each check.” Economist Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research tells Bloomberg that the boost was so small that people largely didn’t notice.Expect the White House to float plenty of other ideas: “The President seems increasingly animated by reports of a potential recession as he continues to drop haymakers via @realDonaldTrump at Jay Powell, the news media, and everyone in between,” analyst Chris Krueger of the Cowen Washington Research Group wrote to clients. “In this vein, we continue to believe stories like this payroll tax trial balloon are just the beginning; Trump will throw every stimulative policy kitchen sink at Capitol Hill and the Twitter universe for the next 442 days.”Like what you're reading? Sign up for our free newsletter.

    President Trump said Tuesday that his administration is considering a push to cut the payroll and capital gains taxes, but he insisted that such moves aren’t imminent and would not come as the result of rising recession fears.“I’ve been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time,” he said. “Whether or not we do it now, it’s not being done because of recession.”Mixed messages: Trump and others in the administration have been sending conflicting signals regarding the economy and potential measures to prevent a recession. While they’ve publicly touted an ongoing boom, they’ve reportedly been scrambling behind the scenes for ways to bolster business and consumer spending. The New York Times reported that, driven by concerns about the economy ahead of the 2020 elections, the White House was also considering reversing some of the president’s tariffs.In response to a Washington Post report Monday evening that senior officials had held early discussions about a potential payroll tax cut, the White House said that the idea “is not something under consideration at this time.” White House spokesman Hogan Gidley then told Fox News on Tuesday morning that officials had “talked about all types of options,” adding that the administration is “always looking to give people back their hard-earned money and that’s what the conversation was about.”Trump himself has touted the strength of the economy in recent days while simultaneously calling on the Federal Reserve and its chairman, Jerome Powell, to slash interest rates by a full percentage point — the kind of move the central bank might take in response to a pronounced economic downturn.On Tuesday, Trump told reporters that the economy is “doing fantastically” and that “we’re very far” from a recession. But he again pressed the Fed to “be proactive” by slashing interest rates and resuming the extraordinary “quantitative easing” it undertook to inject more money into the economy during the last downturn.A payroll tax cut is highly unlikely: Unless the economy takes a severe turn for the worse, a payroll tax cut is only slightly more probable than the U.S. buying Greenland. It would require congressional approval, and while Democrats have in the past supported payroll tax cuts more than Republicans, they might see a push at this point as being driven more by election politics than economic necessity.The cost would likely be an issue for some lawmakers as well. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that a temporary cut in the employee-side payroll tax would cost $70 to $75 billion a year in lost revenue for every percentage point reduction. Lawmakers would have to decide whether that revenue loss would hit the Treasury or the Social Security Trust Fund.And it might not do much anyway: The Obama administration cut the payroll tax for employees in 2011 and 2012, lowering the rate from 6.2% to 4.2% as part of an effort to stimulate the economy in the wake of the Great Recession. Bloomberg’s Laura Davison reports that those cuts “reduced the tax burden for a median-income family by about $996, according to Politifact. Spread over a twice-a-month pay days, that meant about $41.50 extra in each check.” Economist Dean Baker of the Center for Economic and Policy Research tells Bloomberg that the boost was so small that people largely didn’t notice.Expect the White House to float plenty of other ideas: “The President seems increasingly animated by reports of a potential recession as he continues to drop haymakers via @realDonaldTrump at Jay Powell, the news media, and everyone in between,” analyst Chris Krueger of the Cowen Washington Research Group wrote to clients. “In this vein, we continue to believe stories like this payroll tax trial balloon are just the beginning; Trump will throw every stimulative policy kitchen sink at Capitol Hill and the Twitter universe for the next 442 days.”Like what you're reading? Sign up for our free newsletter.


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  • 24/78   What Kind Of Shareholder Appears On The Overseas Education Limited's (SGX:RQ1) Shareholder Register?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The big shareholder groups in Overseas Education Limited (SGX:RQ1) have power over the company. Institutions often own...

    The big shareholder groups in Overseas Education Limited (SGX:RQ1) have power over the company. Institutions often own...


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  • 25/78   'You prepare for war': how one U.S. firm tried escaping Trump's China tariffs
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    When Larry Sloven heard last year that U.S. tariffs threatened his China electronics business, he knew that setting up shop elsewhere would be a slog rather than an adventure.  The 70-year-old had spent half his life building supply chains in southern China to produce goods for big-box U.S. retailers.  'It is the hardest thing I've ever had to do in all my 30 years in the business,' said Sloven, president of Capstone International HK Ltd, a division of Florida-based Capstone Companies.

    When Larry Sloven heard last year that U.S. tariffs threatened his China electronics business, he knew that setting up shop elsewhere would be a slog rather than an adventure. The 70-year-old had spent half his life building supply chains in southern China to produce goods for big-box U.S. retailers. 'It is the hardest thing I've ever had to do in all my 30 years in the business,' said Sloven, president of Capstone International HK Ltd, a division of Florida-based Capstone Companies.


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  • 26/78   Here's What Gale Pacific Limited's (ASX:GAP) P/E Ratio Is Telling Us
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios...

    This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios...


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  • 27/78   What Should You Know About Fiducian Group Limited's (ASX:FID) Future?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Fiducian Group Limited's (ASX:FID) latest earnings update in August 2019 signalled that the company experienced a...

    Fiducian Group Limited's (ASX:FID) latest earnings update in August 2019 signalled that the company experienced a...


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  • 28/78   One Thing To Remember About The Class Limited (ASX:CL1) Share Price
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Anyone researching Class Limited (ASX:CL1) might want to consider the historical volatility of the share price. Modern...

    Anyone researching Class Limited (ASX:CL1) might want to consider the historical volatility of the share price. Modern...


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  • 29/78   Why Is Prem Watsa Underperforming the Market?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Fairfax Financial looks like a promising buy Continue reading...

    Fairfax Financial looks like a promising buy Continue reading...


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  • 30/78   Does BSA (ASX:BSA) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...


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  • 31/78   How Many China SCE Group Holdings Limited (HKG:1966) Shares Did Insiders Buy, In The Last Year?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. On...

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. On...


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  • 32/78   Blockchain Is Revolutionizing The Way We Do Business
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Blockchain is one of the most revolutionary technologies of this generation and has applications that spread across every sector of our economy. The technology has applications that go way beyond a means of transferring wealth.

    Blockchain is one of the most revolutionary technologies of this generation and has applications that spread across every sector of our economy. The technology has applications that go way beyond a means of transferring wealth.


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  • 33/78   Hebei Yichen Industrial Group (HKG:1596) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of...

    Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of...


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  • 34/78   Trump team braces GOP donors for a potential ‘moderate and short’ recession
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The White House is weighing cuts to corporate and payroll taxes, among other measures, to cushion the U.S. economy if an election-year recession hits.

    The White House is weighing cuts to corporate and payroll taxes, among other measures, to cushion the U.S. economy if an election-year recession hits.


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  • 35/78   Should You Take Comfort From Insider Transactions At Carpenter Tan Holdings Limited (HKG:837)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. On...

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. On...


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  • 36/78   'You prepare for war': how one U.S. firm tried escaping Trump's China tariffs
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    When Larry Sloven heard last year that U.S. tariffs threatened his China electronics business, he knew that setting up shop elsewhere would be a slog rather than an adventure.  The 70-year-old had spent half his life building supply chains in southern China to produce goods for big-box U.S. retailers.  'It is the hardest thing I've ever had to do in all my 30 years in the business,' said Sloven, president of Capstone International HK Ltd, a division of Florida-based Capstone Companies.

    When Larry Sloven heard last year that U.S. tariffs threatened his China electronics business, he knew that setting up shop elsewhere would be a slog rather than an adventure. The 70-year-old had spent half his life building supply chains in southern China to produce goods for big-box U.S. retailers. 'It is the hardest thing I've ever had to do in all my 30 years in the business,' said Sloven, president of Capstone International HK Ltd, a division of Florida-based Capstone Companies.


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  • 37/78   Is China Tianrui Group Cement Company Limited (HKG:1252) Better Than Average At Deploying Capital?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we are going to look at China Tianrui Group Cement Company Limited (HKG:1252) to see whether it might be an...

    Today we are going to look at China Tianrui Group Cement Company Limited (HKG:1252) to see whether it might be an...


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  • 38/78   How Much Crude Oil Has The World Really Consumed?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Oil demand growth might be slowing, but we haven't reached peak oil demand yet, and as the world surpasses the 100 million barrel per day mark, Oilprice.com researchers try to answer the question how much oil the world has ever used

    Oil demand growth might be slowing, but we haven't reached peak oil demand yet, and as the world surpasses the 100 million barrel per day mark, Oilprice.com researchers try to answer the question how much oil the world has ever used


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  • 39/78   Conte Quits as Italy Premier, Blames Salvini for Government Fall
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Giuseppe Conte is done working with Matteo Salvini. Now, it’s up to Italy’s president to decide whether Conte is through as a politician too.Just over a year after agreeing to front Italy’s oddball coalition as its prime minister, the former academic handed his resignation in to President Sergio Mattarella Tuesday night, leaving his brief political career up in the air.Conte earlier in the day declared that the coalition featuring Salvini’s anti-immigration party, the League, was dead. But Conte could still return at the head of another majority if Mattarella judges it could offer some stability to the country.Consultations with Mattarella will start on Wednesday at 4 p.m. local time, though talks with the bigger parties aren’t due until the following day.Salvini, 46, pulled his support from the governing alliance with the anti-establishment Five Star Movement this month, seeking to cash in on strong poll ratings and attempting to wrong-foot the political establishment with a mid-summer power grab while parliament was in recess.Bond investors have instead welcomed the prospect of an alternative coalition that could forestall a snap election.True, any anti-Salvini alliance could turn out to be a fragile administration that only delays the moment when Italy’s mountain of public debt -- a chronic concern for both European officials and international investors -- comes under the control of a right-wing ideologue set on confrontation with Brussels.Yields on 10-year Italian bonds touched 1.31% on Tuesday, the lowest level since 2016, while the spread over German bonds -- a key gauge of risk in the nation -- dropped to 200 basis points for the first time in nearly two weeks.If Conte’s fiery appearance in the Senate Tuesday afternoon proves to be his final act as premier, he left no one in any doubt as to who he blames for his demise.Conte charged that the League leader’s demand for an election was self-interested and irresponsible. With Salvini sitting alongside him in parliament, he took his nemesis to task for his non-stop campaigning, saying it isn’t in Italy’s interest to hold elections every year.The premier also accused his deputy of not properly responding to allegations in the so-called Russiagate case and said he had overstepped his role as minister.The populist coalition’s life “terminates here,” Conte said. The League leader “assumed a big responsibility” in precipitating the crisis, Conte said.While the premier’s remarks were interrupted several times by shouts from lawmakers, Salvini remained impassive, occasionally shaking his head. But the combative deputy premier didn’t pull any punches when his turn came to speak.The unruly coalition, which lasted just over a year, wasn’t brought down by him but by the fictitious “Signore No” that Salvini likes to invoke to demonstrate inactivity and inertia among his political enemies.“I’d do it all over again if I had another chance,” Salvini told Senators.Salvini claimed the League is ready with a 50 billion-euro ($55 billion) budget plan that will allow for tax cuts and more spending, and ridiculed Five Star for considering an alliance with the establishment Democratic Party, or PD -- a group they’ve spent years attacking.“I’m not afraid of a PD-Five Star alliance,” Salvini said.Five Star and the PD have been holding unofficial talks to gauge the chances that they can form a government, but more structured negotiations will only start after Mattarella kicks off consultations, according to PD officials who asked not to be named discussing confidential matters.The back-and-forth of Tuesday’s proceedings in parliament shows that Five Star and the PD have been in contact for weeks, Salvini charged, in comments to reporters in Rome, wishing his former coalition partners “good luck” if they decide to work together with the PD.\--With assistance from Marco Bertacche, Iain Rogers, Tommaso Ebhardt and Daniele Lepido.To contact the reporters on this story: Jerrold Colten in Milan at jcolten@bloomberg.net;Lorenzo Totaro in Rome at ltotaro@bloomberg.net;Chiara Albanese in Rome at calbanese10@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Ben Sills, Chiara VasarriFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Giuseppe Conte is done working with Matteo Salvini. Now, it’s up to Italy’s president to decide whether Conte is through as a politician too.Just over a year after agreeing to front Italy’s oddball coalition as its prime minister, the former academic handed his resignation in to President Sergio Mattarella Tuesday night, leaving his brief political career up in the air.Conte earlier in the day declared that the coalition featuring Salvini’s anti-immigration party, the League, was dead. But Conte could still return at the head of another majority if Mattarella judges it could offer some stability to the country.Consultations with Mattarella will start on Wednesday at 4 p.m. local time, though talks with the bigger parties aren’t due until the following day.Salvini, 46, pulled his support from the governing alliance with the anti-establishment Five Star Movement this month, seeking to cash in on strong poll ratings and attempting to wrong-foot the political establishment with a mid-summer power grab while parliament was in recess.Bond investors have instead welcomed the prospect of an alternative coalition that could forestall a snap election.True, any anti-Salvini alliance could turn out to be a fragile administration that only delays the moment when Italy’s mountain of public debt -- a chronic concern for both European officials and international investors -- comes under the control of a right-wing ideologue set on confrontation with Brussels.Yields on 10-year Italian bonds touched 1.31% on Tuesday, the lowest level since 2016, while the spread over German bonds -- a key gauge of risk in the nation -- dropped to 200 basis points for the first time in nearly two weeks.If Conte’s fiery appearance in the Senate Tuesday afternoon proves to be his final act as premier, he left no one in any doubt as to who he blames for his demise.Conte charged that the League leader’s demand for an election was self-interested and irresponsible. With Salvini sitting alongside him in parliament, he took his nemesis to task for his non-stop campaigning, saying it isn’t in Italy’s interest to hold elections every year.The premier also accused his deputy of not properly responding to allegations in the so-called Russiagate case and said he had overstepped his role as minister.The populist coalition’s life “terminates here,” Conte said. The League leader “assumed a big responsibility” in precipitating the crisis, Conte said.While the premier’s remarks were interrupted several times by shouts from lawmakers, Salvini remained impassive, occasionally shaking his head. But the combative deputy premier didn’t pull any punches when his turn came to speak.The unruly coalition, which lasted just over a year, wasn’t brought down by him but by the fictitious “Signore No” that Salvini likes to invoke to demonstrate inactivity and inertia among his political enemies.“I’d do it all over again if I had another chance,” Salvini told Senators.Salvini claimed the League is ready with a 50 billion-euro ($55 billion) budget plan that will allow for tax cuts and more spending, and ridiculed Five Star for considering an alliance with the establishment Democratic Party, or PD -- a group they’ve spent years attacking.“I’m not afraid of a PD-Five Star alliance,” Salvini said.Five Star and the PD have been holding unofficial talks to gauge the chances that they can form a government, but more structured negotiations will only start after Mattarella kicks off consultations, according to PD officials who asked not to be named discussing confidential matters.The back-and-forth of Tuesday’s proceedings in parliament shows that Five Star and the PD have been in contact for weeks, Salvini charged, in comments to reporters in Rome, wishing his former coalition partners “good luck” if they decide to work together with the PD.\--With assistance from Marco Bertacche, Iain Rogers, Tommaso Ebhardt and Daniele Lepido.To contact the reporters on this story: Jerrold Colten in Milan at jcolten@bloomberg.net;Lorenzo Totaro in Rome at ltotaro@bloomberg.net;Chiara Albanese in Rome at calbanese10@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Ben Sills, Chiara VasarriFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 40/78   CNN Pundit’s Bodyguard Charged with Assault after Removing Reporter Covering Her Speech
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    CNN pundit April Ryan's security guard has been charged with assault after he forcibly removed a local New Jersey reporter from an event at which Ryan was delivering a speech.Charlie Kravotil, editor of New Brunswick Today, claims that Ryan's bodyguard, 30-year-old Joel Morris, approached him during Ryan's speech at The Heldrich Hotel on August 3 and stole his camera after he refused to stop filming.A video of the incident shows Kravotil, who secured press credentials for the event, following Morris into the lobby of the hotel to retrieve his camera. After the local journalist reclaimed his camera, Morris grabbed his arm, placed it behind his back, and shoved him out of the hotel.Morris has been charged with harassment, assault, and theft in connection with the incident.Kravotil says he was invited to the event and was allowed to film for roughly two hours before Ryan took the stage to deliver a speech, at which point Morris stole his camera but allowed other people in the room to continue filming. He called on Ryan to apologize for the incident in a Monday tweet.“She’s been silent about the unacceptable and illegal behavior of her bodyguard, Joel Morris, and we are still waiting for her comment on this unfortunate incident,” Kravotil said in a video posted to Twitter. “Maybe now that there are criminal charges, we might hear something from her. I hope, sincerely, that she does comment and I hope she does condemn this. This is unacceptable. . . . In our country, we have freedom of the press.”Ryan is a vociferous critic of President Trump and routinely disparages him for his rhetorical attacks on the press, even authoring a book on the subject last year entitled Under Fire: Reporting from the Front Lines of the Trump White House.

    CNN pundit April Ryan's security guard has been charged with assault after he forcibly removed a local New Jersey reporter from an event at which Ryan was delivering a speech.Charlie Kravotil, editor of New Brunswick Today, claims that Ryan's bodyguard, 30-year-old Joel Morris, approached him during Ryan's speech at The Heldrich Hotel on August 3 and stole his camera after he refused to stop filming.A video of the incident shows Kravotil, who secured press credentials for the event, following Morris into the lobby of the hotel to retrieve his camera. After the local journalist reclaimed his camera, Morris grabbed his arm, placed it behind his back, and shoved him out of the hotel.Morris has been charged with harassment, assault, and theft in connection with the incident.Kravotil says he was invited to the event and was allowed to film for roughly two hours before Ryan took the stage to deliver a speech, at which point Morris stole his camera but allowed other people in the room to continue filming. He called on Ryan to apologize for the incident in a Monday tweet.“She’s been silent about the unacceptable and illegal behavior of her bodyguard, Joel Morris, and we are still waiting for her comment on this unfortunate incident,” Kravotil said in a video posted to Twitter. “Maybe now that there are criminal charges, we might hear something from her. I hope, sincerely, that she does comment and I hope she does condemn this. This is unacceptable. . . . In our country, we have freedom of the press.”Ryan is a vociferous critic of President Trump and routinely disparages him for his rhetorical attacks on the press, even authoring a book on the subject last year entitled Under Fire: Reporting from the Front Lines of the Trump White House.


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  • 41/78   Airstrikes target Turkish convoy in Syria, raising tensions
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Airstrikes targeted a Turkish army convoy inside a rebel-held part of northwestern Syria on Monday, killing three civilians and wounding 12 others, the Turkish Defense Ministry said.  Syria said the Turkish convoy was carrying ammunition to rebels who have lost ground this month amid a government offensive to retake their last stronghold in the country.  The incident ratcheted up tensions in the region, currently ground zero in the long-running Syrian civil war that has put Turkish, Russian, U.S. and Iranian interests at stake.

    Airstrikes targeted a Turkish army convoy inside a rebel-held part of northwestern Syria on Monday, killing three civilians and wounding 12 others, the Turkish Defense Ministry said. Syria said the Turkish convoy was carrying ammunition to rebels who have lost ground this month amid a government offensive to retake their last stronghold in the country. The incident ratcheted up tensions in the region, currently ground zero in the long-running Syrian civil war that has put Turkish, Russian, U.S. and Iranian interests at stake.


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  • 42/78   Man pees in sink behind Starbucks counter and douses merchandise, Penn. cops say
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Pennsylvania police are looking for a man suspected of peeing in a Starbucks sink and onto merchandise in the store.

    Pennsylvania police are looking for a man suspected of peeing in a Starbucks sink and onto merchandise in the store.


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  • 43/78   Detained Iranian tanker sets sail from Gibraltar as Tehran warns US not to seize ship
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Iranian tanker seized by British royal marines near Gibraltar in July on suspicion of carrying oil to Syria has left port.Shipping data showed the Grace 1, renamed the Adrian Darya 1, leaving Gibraltar around 11pm on Sunday, and is believed to be heading to Kalamata in Greece.

    The Iranian tanker seized by British royal marines near Gibraltar in July on suspicion of carrying oil to Syria has left port.Shipping data showed the Grace 1, renamed the Adrian Darya 1, leaving Gibraltar around 11pm on Sunday, and is believed to be heading to Kalamata in Greece.


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  • 44/78   A Neutron Star Might Have Just Collided with a Black Hole
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists are comparing the historic explosion to

    Scientists are comparing the historic explosion to "the night before Christmas."


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  • 45/78   Mexican man facing voter fraud trial in Sacramento. He’s a Trump supporter
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    For years, President Trump has claimed that millions of noncitizens voted in the 2016 presidential election, unfairly skewing his vote as Democrat Hillary Clinton won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College.

    For years, President Trump has claimed that millions of noncitizens voted in the 2016 presidential election, unfairly skewing his vote as Democrat Hillary Clinton won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College.


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  • 46/78   Jail parents over skipping school? Some 2020 Democrats threatened it
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Kamala Harris says she didn't send anyone to jail, but critics say her policy

    Kamala Harris says she didn't send anyone to jail, but critics say her policy "perpetuates poverty." Other 2020 Dems worked to decriminalize truancy.


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  • 47/78   Woman Taking Over a Subway for Her Glamorous Selfie Photoshoot Is the Latest Example of Knowing One's Worth
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A hero and an icon

    A hero and an icon


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  • 48/78   Homeless crisis spiraling out of control in West Coast cities
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Former California Rep. Darrell Issa breaks down the problematic policies fueling the homeless crisis on the West Coast.

    Former California Rep. Darrell Issa breaks down the problematic policies fueling the homeless crisis on the West Coast.


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  • 49/78   SUPREME COURT NOTEBOOK: Gender pronouns part of LGBT fight
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS






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  • 50/78   Water pollution can reduce economic growth by a third: World Bank
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Heavily polluted water is reducing economic growth by up to a third in some countries, a World Bank report said Tuesday, calling for action to address human and environmental harm.  The report relied on what the Bank said was the biggest-ever database assembled on global water quality using monitoring stations, satellite data and machine learning models.  'Clean water is a key factor for economic growth.

    Heavily polluted water is reducing economic growth by up to a third in some countries, a World Bank report said Tuesday, calling for action to address human and environmental harm. The report relied on what the Bank said was the biggest-ever database assembled on global water quality using monitoring stations, satellite data and machine learning models. 'Clean water is a key factor for economic growth.


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  • 51/78   India's Moon probe enters lunar orbit
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    India's Chandrayaan 2 spacecraft entered lunar orbit on Tuesday, executing one of the trickiest manoeuvres on its historic mission to the Moon.  After four weeks in space, the craft completed its Lunar Orbit Insertion as planned, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said in a statement.  ISRO chief K. Sivan said the manoeuvre was a key milestone for the mission, adding he was hoping for a perfect landing next month.

    India's Chandrayaan 2 spacecraft entered lunar orbit on Tuesday, executing one of the trickiest manoeuvres on its historic mission to the Moon. After four weeks in space, the craft completed its Lunar Orbit Insertion as planned, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said in a statement. ISRO chief K. Sivan said the manoeuvre was a key milestone for the mission, adding he was hoping for a perfect landing next month.


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  • 52/78   China hopes U.S. will come back to the table at Chile climate talks
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    China hopes to welcome the United States 'back to the negotiating table' to discuss global efforts to limit climate change at a United Nations summit to be hosted by Chile in December, its top climate change envoy said on Tuesday.  Trump has signalled his intention to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Paris climate accord and been dismissive of regulations aimed at slashing greenhouse gas emissions.

    China hopes to welcome the United States 'back to the negotiating table' to discuss global efforts to limit climate change at a United Nations summit to be hosted by Chile in December, its top climate change envoy said on Tuesday. Trump has signalled his intention to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Paris climate accord and been dismissive of regulations aimed at slashing greenhouse gas emissions.


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  • 53/78   China hopes U.S. will come back to the table at Chile climate talks
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    China hopes to welcome the United States 'back to the negotiating table' to discuss global efforts to limit climate change at a United Nations summit to be hosted by Chile in December, its top climate change envoy said on Tuesday.  Trump has signaled his intention to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Paris climate accord and been dismissive of regulations aimed at slashing greenhouse gas emissions.

    China hopes to welcome the United States 'back to the negotiating table' to discuss global efforts to limit climate change at a United Nations summit to be hosted by Chile in December, its top climate change envoy said on Tuesday. Trump has signaled his intention to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Paris climate accord and been dismissive of regulations aimed at slashing greenhouse gas emissions.


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  • 54/78   Plague-infected prairie dogs thwart Phish concert-goers camping plans
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The jam-band Phish announced Tuesday that plague-infected -- yes, that plague -- prairie dog colonies had forced the cancellation of overnight camping and vending for its annual concert series near Denver.  The band will still play over the Labor Day holiday weekend but said in a statement that health officials overseeing Colorado's Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge urged precautionary measures like restricting parking and camping to prevent potential spread of the disease.  'We recognize the tremendous inconvenience this may cause for those who had planned on camping,' said Phish, a rock band known for its improvisation and hardcore fan base.

    The jam-band Phish announced Tuesday that plague-infected -- yes, that plague -- prairie dog colonies had forced the cancellation of overnight camping and vending for its annual concert series near Denver. The band will still play over the Labor Day holiday weekend but said in a statement that health officials overseeing Colorado's Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge urged precautionary measures like restricting parking and camping to prevent potential spread of the disease. 'We recognize the tremendous inconvenience this may cause for those who had planned on camping,' said Phish, a rock band known for its improvisation and hardcore fan base.


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  • 55/78   Inovio Ends Enrollment in Anal Dysplasia Study on VGX-3100
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Inovio (INO) closes enrollment in the phase II study evaluating VGX-3100 for the treatment of HPV-related high-grade anal dysplasia. Shares up.

    Inovio (INO) closes enrollment in the phase II study evaluating VGX-3100 for the treatment of HPV-related high-grade anal dysplasia. Shares up.


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  • 56/78   Higher oxygen levels helped dinosaurs to thrive and spread, experts find
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Rising levels of oxygen in the atmosphere hundreds of millions of years ago helped dinosaurs in North America to flourish, scientists have found.Levels of the gas rose by nearly a third in three million years, which experts say is very rapid in geological terms.

    Rising levels of oxygen in the atmosphere hundreds of millions of years ago helped dinosaurs in North America to flourish, scientists have found.Levels of the gas rose by nearly a third in three million years, which experts say is very rapid in geological terms.


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  • 57/78   Britain tops healthy league table in supermarket sold food, Oxford University study finds
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Britain isn’t on a junk food diet - the food sold in its supermarkets tops health league tables, a study by Oxford University suggests.  The study of more than 400,000 food and drink products from 12 countries ranked Britain best for the levels of sugar, fat, salt and calories in common foods.  The ranking came despite the fact the UK has the highest obesity levels in western Europe.  And the US - which has the highest obesity levels in the world - was found to have the second healthiest offerings on sale, followed by Australia.  The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford analysed assessed countries using Australia’s Health Star Rating system – which measures the levels of the nutrients such as energy, salt, sugar, saturated fat as well as protein, calcium and fibre.  It found that the UK had the highest average Health Star Rating of 2.83, followed by the US at 2.82 and Australia at 2.81. India got the lowest rating of just 2.27 followed by China at 2.43 with Chile coming third from bottom at 2.44.  The results were published in Obesity Reviews. Lead author Dr Elizabeth Dunford said: “Globally we’re all eating more and more processed foods and that’s a concern because our supermarkets’ shelves are full of products that are high in bad fats, sugar and salt and are potentially making us sick. Our results show that some countries are doing a much better job than others.” Later this year, Public Health England is due to issue new calorie guidelines setting out stringent calorie limits on hundreds of foods, such as sandwiches and ready meals.  The body has already set targets for sugar content of common foods, which critics say would result in the elimination of traditional sweets, such as Sherbet Lemons and Parma Violets.

    Britain isn’t on a junk food diet - the food sold in its supermarkets tops health league tables, a study by Oxford University suggests.  The study of more than 400,000 food and drink products from 12 countries ranked Britain best for the levels of sugar, fat, salt and calories in common foods.  The ranking came despite the fact the UK has the highest obesity levels in western Europe.  And the US - which has the highest obesity levels in the world - was found to have the second healthiest offerings on sale, followed by Australia.  The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford analysed assessed countries using Australia’s Health Star Rating system – which measures the levels of the nutrients such as energy, salt, sugar, saturated fat as well as protein, calcium and fibre.  It found that the UK had the highest average Health Star Rating of 2.83, followed by the US at 2.82 and Australia at 2.81. India got the lowest rating of just 2.27 followed by China at 2.43 with Chile coming third from bottom at 2.44.  The results were published in Obesity Reviews. Lead author Dr Elizabeth Dunford said: “Globally we’re all eating more and more processed foods and that’s a concern because our supermarkets’ shelves are full of products that are high in bad fats, sugar and salt and are potentially making us sick. Our results show that some countries are doing a much better job than others.” Later this year, Public Health England is due to issue new calorie guidelines setting out stringent calorie limits on hundreds of foods, such as sandwiches and ready meals.  The body has already set targets for sugar content of common foods, which critics say would result in the elimination of traditional sweets, such as Sherbet Lemons and Parma Violets.


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  • 58/78   Kamala Harris, in Reversal, to Participate in Climate Town Hall
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    After previously declining the invitation due to a scheduling conflict, the California Senator became the 10th confirmed participant in the September 4th event

    After previously declining the invitation due to a scheduling conflict, the California Senator became the 10th confirmed participant in the September 4th event


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  • 59/78   US Space Command will launch this month, ahead of Trump's Space Force
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Vice President Mike Pence announced that the U.S. Space Command, a crucial step to the creation of the Space Force, would be established next week.

    Vice President Mike Pence announced that the U.S. Space Command, a crucial step to the creation of the Space Force, would be established next week.


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  • 60/78   US says anyone who 'touches' Iran tanker risks US sanctions
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS






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  • 61/78   U.K. Steps Up Brexit Preparedness for Firms as Deadline Looms
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- British exporters are to be enrolled in a key customs system so they can trade with the European Union after Britain’s scheduled departure on Oct. 31.The U.K. tax authority will automatically issue more than 88,000 companies with an Economic Operator Registration and Identification number over the next two weeks, the Treasury said in a statement on Wednesday. Without it, the firms would no longer be able to trade with the EU after exit day.“This will help ease the flow of goods at border points and support businesses to trade and grow,” Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said.EORI numbers are required to move goods into or out of the EU. Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs estimated earlier this year that 240,000 companies would need one after Brexit, and to date just 72,000 have sought one. That left tens of thousands of firms at risk of being cut off from their only export market.Until now, the onus had been on companies to register. The automatic registration program only applies to companies that are Value Added Tax-registered. Those that aren’t will have to complete the registration themselves, according to the Treasury.The British Chambers of Commerce, which had campaigned for automatic issuance of EORI numbers, welcomed the measure but said it’s only a “first step” that will “trigger more questions.”“Businesses still need clarity on many other cross-border trade issues, such as customs procedures at borders following a no deal exit and when the government will launch an official database to provide ease of access to information on tariffs and quotas,” Director General Adam Marshall said. “The government must urgently provide answers to these questions, and ramp up both guidance and support for businesses.”Separately, the government said it was making an additional 9 million pounds ($10.9 million) available to ensure major ports and surrounding areas are ready for Brexit.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Andrew Atkinson, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- British exporters are to be enrolled in a key customs system so they can trade with the European Union after Britain’s scheduled departure on Oct. 31.The U.K. tax authority will automatically issue more than 88,000 companies with an Economic Operator Registration and Identification number over the next two weeks, the Treasury said in a statement on Wednesday. Without it, the firms would no longer be able to trade with the EU after exit day.“This will help ease the flow of goods at border points and support businesses to trade and grow,” Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said.EORI numbers are required to move goods into or out of the EU. Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs estimated earlier this year that 240,000 companies would need one after Brexit, and to date just 72,000 have sought one. That left tens of thousands of firms at risk of being cut off from their only export market.Until now, the onus had been on companies to register. The automatic registration program only applies to companies that are Value Added Tax-registered. Those that aren’t will have to complete the registration themselves, according to the Treasury.The British Chambers of Commerce, which had campaigned for automatic issuance of EORI numbers, welcomed the measure but said it’s only a “first step” that will “trigger more questions.”“Businesses still need clarity on many other cross-border trade issues, such as customs procedures at borders following a no deal exit and when the government will launch an official database to provide ease of access to information on tariffs and quotas,” Director General Adam Marshall said. “The government must urgently provide answers to these questions, and ramp up both guidance and support for businesses.”Separately, the government said it was making an additional 9 million pounds ($10.9 million) available to ensure major ports and surrounding areas are ready for Brexit.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Andrew Atkinson, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 62/78   Carrie Symonds 'barred from entering the US over Somalia trip'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Carrie Symonds, Boris Johnson's girlfriend, has reportedly been barred from visiting the United States.  According to the Daily Mail, Miss Symonds, 31, applied for a visa to go to America in the next few days as part of her job with a US-based environmental group, but the American authorities have blocked the request. It is believed the decision stems from a five-day visit made last year by Miss Symonds to Somalia.  If Miss Symonds applied for a US Electronic System for Travel Authorization (Esta) you will have an application refused for visiting Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia or Yemen since March 2011. Miss Symonds has a series of meetings in America as part of her job as an adviser for Oceana, a non-profit organisation that seeks to protect the world's oceans. Miss Symonds declined to comment when approached through Number 10 by the Telegraph.

    Carrie Symonds, Boris Johnson's girlfriend, has reportedly been barred from visiting the United States.  According to the Daily Mail, Miss Symonds, 31, applied for a visa to go to America in the next few days as part of her job with a US-based environmental group, but the American authorities have blocked the request. It is believed the decision stems from a five-day visit made last year by Miss Symonds to Somalia.  If Miss Symonds applied for a US Electronic System for Travel Authorization (Esta) you will have an application refused for visiting Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia or Yemen since March 2011. Miss Symonds has a series of meetings in America as part of her job as an adviser for Oceana, a non-profit organisation that seeks to protect the world's oceans. Miss Symonds declined to comment when approached through Number 10 by the Telegraph.


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  • 63/78   Guatemala anti-corruption commission submits final report
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A final report by the U.N.-backed anti-corruption commission in Guatemala says the body helped bring 120 cases resulting in charges against 1,540 people.  The commission is known by its Spanish initials CICIG.  It has operated for 12 years, but outgoing President Jimmy Morales refused to renew its mandate.

    A final report by the U.N.-backed anti-corruption commission in Guatemala says the body helped bring 120 cases resulting in charges against 1,540 people. The commission is known by its Spanish initials CICIG. It has operated for 12 years, but outgoing President Jimmy Morales refused to renew its mandate.


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  • 64/78   US urges UN to extend Iran arms embargo, travel ban
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The US urged the United Nations Tuesday to extend an arms embargo on Tehran that is due to expire next year as part of the embattled Iran nuclear deal.  Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the UN Security Council that the clock was ticking on a resolution restricting weapons sales to Iran that is due to end in October 2020.

    The US urged the United Nations Tuesday to extend an arms embargo on Tehran that is due to expire next year as part of the embattled Iran nuclear deal. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the UN Security Council that the clock was ticking on a resolution restricting weapons sales to Iran that is due to end in October 2020.


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  • 65/78   Sudan protesters, army announce new ruling body after deal
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  • 66/78   Hong Kong Protests Enter Crucial Period Before China’s Big Anniversary
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- For all the tumult Hong Kong has seen since pro-democracy protests erupted in early June, the countdown to a crucial anniversary for China on Oct. 1 makes the next six weeks particularly sensitive.The 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China, the name used by Communist Party leaders after they forced Chiang Kai-shek’s regime to retreat to Taiwan, will feature a military parade through Beijing personally inspected by President Xi Jinping. That has raised some fears that Xi will seek to get Hong Kong under control by then to avoid any violence that steals headlines.Much may depend on what happens in the first week of September, when students who have been driving the demonstrations are set to return to universities and high schools. While some analysts see the start of the school year sapping support for the protests, student groups are planning strikes to keep up momentum in the push against Beijing’s increased control of Hong Kong.“We have a lot of class strikes planned in September by both secondary school and university students,” said Sunny Cheung, a 23-year-old student and a member of the Hong Kong Institutions International Affairs Delegation, which represents 12 major schools including the University of Hong Kong. “We will have vast support.”‘Golden Window’The heightened stakes have added pressure on Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam to orchestrate a resolution without more violence or potential fatalities that could inflame tensions -- and possibly prompt Xi to mobilize the People’s Liberation Army to maintain control. The peaceful protest on Sunday followed weeks of clashes marked by volleys of tear gas and has provided an opening for both sides to seek common ground.“The next 10 days is a golden window,” Michael Tien, a pro-establishment lawmaker and businessman, told Bloomberg Television on Tuesday. If Hong Kong “wants to avoid any central government intervention during the month of September, this is a perfect time for Carrie Lam to think about addressing some of the five demands.”While China has turned up the pressure on businesses and government officials to try and subdue the protests, sending in forces to quell an uprising is still seen as a last resort. Part of Beijing’s strategy is focusing on the economic damage to Hong Kong in a bid to undermine support for the students, according to Willy Lam, adjunct professor at the Center for China Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.“At least before the National Day, China will not resort to armed force to defuse the Hong Kong protests,” Lam said. “Any movement of that kind will only cast a shadow on the anniversary itself.”Olive BranchThe protesters have said they won’t leave the streets until Lam completely withdraws a bill allowing extraditions to China, opens an independent inquiry into police violence, releases those arrested, stops calling protesters “rioters” and allows citizens to pick their leaders. Beijing has so far refused to yield and has backed the police to punish protesters who break the law.Lam on Tuesday offered a bit of an olive branch to protesters, offering to establish a platform for dialogue, investigate complaints against police and institute a wide-ranging fact-finding study into the root causes of the conflict. While the move falls short of protester demands, and was quickly rejected by the main group leading the demonstrations, it showed a willingness to at least consider steps that go halfway.Protesters are planning several more actions over the next few weeks that will show whether they can build upon Sunday’s peaceful rally. Demonstrators are divided between moderates and more extreme groups that have brandished iron poles and thrown Molotov cocktails at police officers who have in turn used tear gas, batons and bean-bag rounds.‘Rare Moment’Groups of demonstrators are divided between moderates and more extreme groups that have brandished iron poles and thrown Molotov cocktails at police officers who have in turn used tear gas, batons and bean-bag rounds.Opposition lawmaker Fernando Cheung, who has often been at the scene of flash-points trying to defuse tensions, said the government would be wrong to think the protests would subside in September when students go back to school. Still, he saw the relative pause in hostilities as a key chance to come up with a solution before things get worse.“This is a rare moment that the more militant side of the protesters have agreed to exercise restraint,” Cheung said. “But if there is no response -- or if this is the response -- it basically means there is no end to this. And the chaotic situation will continue. There could be more escalation, and it won’t be pretty.”To contact the reporters on this story: Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.net;Sheryl Tian Tong Lee in Hong Kong at slee1905@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Daniel Ten Kate, Chris KayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- For all the tumult Hong Kong has seen since pro-democracy protests erupted in early June, the countdown to a crucial anniversary for China on Oct. 1 makes the next six weeks particularly sensitive.The 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China, the name used by Communist Party leaders after they forced Chiang Kai-shek’s regime to retreat to Taiwan, will feature a military parade through Beijing personally inspected by President Xi Jinping. That has raised some fears that Xi will seek to get Hong Kong under control by then to avoid any violence that steals headlines.Much may depend on what happens in the first week of September, when students who have been driving the demonstrations are set to return to universities and high schools. While some analysts see the start of the school year sapping support for the protests, student groups are planning strikes to keep up momentum in the push against Beijing’s increased control of Hong Kong.“We have a lot of class strikes planned in September by both secondary school and university students,” said Sunny Cheung, a 23-year-old student and a member of the Hong Kong Institutions International Affairs Delegation, which represents 12 major schools including the University of Hong Kong. “We will have vast support.”‘Golden Window’The heightened stakes have added pressure on Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam to orchestrate a resolution without more violence or potential fatalities that could inflame tensions -- and possibly prompt Xi to mobilize the People’s Liberation Army to maintain control. The peaceful protest on Sunday followed weeks of clashes marked by volleys of tear gas and has provided an opening for both sides to seek common ground.“The next 10 days is a golden window,” Michael Tien, a pro-establishment lawmaker and businessman, told Bloomberg Television on Tuesday. If Hong Kong “wants to avoid any central government intervention during the month of September, this is a perfect time for Carrie Lam to think about addressing some of the five demands.”While China has turned up the pressure on businesses and government officials to try and subdue the protests, sending in forces to quell an uprising is still seen as a last resort. Part of Beijing’s strategy is focusing on the economic damage to Hong Kong in a bid to undermine support for the students, according to Willy Lam, adjunct professor at the Center for China Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.“At least before the National Day, China will not resort to armed force to defuse the Hong Kong protests,” Lam said. “Any movement of that kind will only cast a shadow on the anniversary itself.”Olive BranchThe protesters have said they won’t leave the streets until Lam completely withdraws a bill allowing extraditions to China, opens an independent inquiry into police violence, releases those arrested, stops calling protesters “rioters” and allows citizens to pick their leaders. Beijing has so far refused to yield and has backed the police to punish protesters who break the law.Lam on Tuesday offered a bit of an olive branch to protesters, offering to establish a platform for dialogue, investigate complaints against police and institute a wide-ranging fact-finding study into the root causes of the conflict. While the move falls short of protester demands, and was quickly rejected by the main group leading the demonstrations, it showed a willingness to at least consider steps that go halfway.Protesters are planning several more actions over the next few weeks that will show whether they can build upon Sunday’s peaceful rally. Demonstrators are divided between moderates and more extreme groups that have brandished iron poles and thrown Molotov cocktails at police officers who have in turn used tear gas, batons and bean-bag rounds.‘Rare Moment’Groups of demonstrators are divided between moderates and more extreme groups that have brandished iron poles and thrown Molotov cocktails at police officers who have in turn used tear gas, batons and bean-bag rounds.Opposition lawmaker Fernando Cheung, who has often been at the scene of flash-points trying to defuse tensions, said the government would be wrong to think the protests would subside in September when students go back to school. Still, he saw the relative pause in hostilities as a key chance to come up with a solution before things get worse.“This is a rare moment that the more militant side of the protesters have agreed to exercise restraint,” Cheung said. “But if there is no response -- or if this is the response -- it basically means there is no end to this. And the chaotic situation will continue. There could be more escalation, and it won’t be pretty.”To contact the reporters on this story: Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.net;Sheryl Tian Tong Lee in Hong Kong at slee1905@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Daniel Ten Kate, Chris KayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 67/78   Assad troops force Syrian rebels to retreat from key town
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Bashar al-Assad has vowed to recapture all of Syria as his forces made significant battlefield gains and drove rebel fighters out of a strategic town he once attacked with chemical weapons. Syrian regime troops pushed rebel forces from Khan Sheikhoun, a town where Assad’s jets once dropped chemical weapons and killed nearly 100 people, prompting Donald Trump to launch retaliatory airstrikes in 2017.  The town has been under rebel control since 2014 and its fall marks a victory for Assad as his troops attempt to conquer Idlib, the last opposition-held province in the northwest of Syria.     Rebel forces led by Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, a jihadist group linked to al-Qaeda, said they were retreating to an area south of the town but would continue fighting against the regime’s advancing troops. Regime troops advanced into the outskirts of Khan Sheikhoun but had yet to fully occupy it. Speaking at a meeting with MPs from Vladimir Putin’s United Russia party, Assad hailed his forces’ progress. “The victories that were achieved prove the determination of the people and the army to defeat terrorists until the liberation of the last inch of Syrian territory,” he said.   He also accused Turkey and Western states of supporting jihadist groups in Syria. Tensions between Turkey and the Syrian regime have been rising sharply as Assad’s forces drive into Idlib, where the Turkish military has 12 military outposts. Regime jets bombed near a Turkish military convoy on Monday, killing three civilians, according to Turkey’s defence ministry. After eight years of civil war, the Idlib region on the border with Turkey is the last major stronghold of opposition  Credit: AFP The fall of Khan Sheikhoun means that one of the Turkish military outposts is now effectively surrounded by regime forces. Mevlut Cavusoglu, Turkey’s foreign minister, said that his country would not withdraw from the outpost at Morek and warned the Syrian regime not to interfere with it.  “We don’t have an intention such as moving this elsewhere,” Mr Cavusoglu said. “We will do whatever is necessary for the security of our own soldiers and observation posts.” Turkey says it established the outposts to counter jihadist groups and help enforce a ceasefire it brokered alongside Russia. The Syrian regime says the outposts are a violation of Syrian sovereignty but has so far refrained from directly attacking them.  However, as the regime advances further into Idlib the chances of a direct confrontation with Turkish forces seem to be rising.  Assad’s forces launched their offensive against Idlib in April but made relatively little progress until the last few weeks, when they have advanced rapidly with the support of withering airstrikes by Russian warplanes.   Around 500 civilians have been killed since the offensive began, including more than 100 children, according to aid groups. A young girl named Jana was killed by Russian bombing on Tuesday, opposition activists said.   The fighting has displaced over 500,000 people in southern Idlib and the northern of the neighbouring province of Hama. Khain Sheikhoun was seen as important symbol of opposition to Assad by rebel supporters “One of the revolution’s castles is occupied by its destroyers,” said one Syrian man in Idlib.  Mike Pompeo, the US secretary of state, said the Islamic State (Isil) remains a threat in Syria and Iraq but has lost much of its ability to carry out centrally-planned attacks on the West. 

    Bashar al-Assad has vowed to recapture all of Syria as his forces made significant battlefield gains and drove rebel fighters out of a strategic town he once attacked with chemical weapons. Syrian regime troops pushed rebel forces from Khan Sheikhoun, a town where Assad’s jets once dropped chemical weapons and killed nearly 100 people, prompting Donald Trump to launch retaliatory airstrikes in 2017.  The town has been under rebel control since 2014 and its fall marks a victory for Assad as his troops attempt to conquer Idlib, the last opposition-held province in the northwest of Syria.     Rebel forces led by Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, a jihadist group linked to al-Qaeda, said they were retreating to an area south of the town but would continue fighting against the regime’s advancing troops. Regime troops advanced into the outskirts of Khan Sheikhoun but had yet to fully occupy it. Speaking at a meeting with MPs from Vladimir Putin’s United Russia party, Assad hailed his forces’ progress. “The victories that were achieved prove the determination of the people and the army to defeat terrorists until the liberation of the last inch of Syrian territory,” he said.   He also accused Turkey and Western states of supporting jihadist groups in Syria. Tensions between Turkey and the Syrian regime have been rising sharply as Assad’s forces drive into Idlib, where the Turkish military has 12 military outposts. Regime jets bombed near a Turkish military convoy on Monday, killing three civilians, according to Turkey’s defence ministry. After eight years of civil war, the Idlib region on the border with Turkey is the last major stronghold of opposition  Credit: AFP The fall of Khan Sheikhoun means that one of the Turkish military outposts is now effectively surrounded by regime forces. Mevlut Cavusoglu, Turkey’s foreign minister, said that his country would not withdraw from the outpost at Morek and warned the Syrian regime not to interfere with it.  “We don’t have an intention such as moving this elsewhere,” Mr Cavusoglu said. “We will do whatever is necessary for the security of our own soldiers and observation posts.” Turkey says it established the outposts to counter jihadist groups and help enforce a ceasefire it brokered alongside Russia. The Syrian regime says the outposts are a violation of Syrian sovereignty but has so far refrained from directly attacking them.  However, as the regime advances further into Idlib the chances of a direct confrontation with Turkish forces seem to be rising.  Assad’s forces launched their offensive against Idlib in April but made relatively little progress until the last few weeks, when they have advanced rapidly with the support of withering airstrikes by Russian warplanes.   Around 500 civilians have been killed since the offensive began, including more than 100 children, according to aid groups. A young girl named Jana was killed by Russian bombing on Tuesday, opposition activists said.   The fighting has displaced over 500,000 people in southern Idlib and the northern of the neighbouring province of Hama. Khain Sheikhoun was seen as important symbol of opposition to Assad by rebel supporters “One of the revolution’s castles is occupied by its destroyers,” said one Syrian man in Idlib.  Mike Pompeo, the US secretary of state, said the Islamic State (Isil) remains a threat in Syria and Iraq but has lost much of its ability to carry out centrally-planned attacks on the West.  "There are places where ISIS is more powerful today than they were three or four years ago," Mr Pompeo told CBS. "But the caliphate is gone in their capacity to conduct external attacks, it's been made much more difficult," he said. The jihadist group was driven from its last territorial stronghold this year but continues to mount insurgency attacks in both Iraq and Syria.


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  • 68/78   EU, Britain clash over Johnson's Brexit backstop demand
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Britain and the EU clashed Tuesday over Prime Minister Boris Johnson's demand to scrap the Irish border backstop plan, as fears mount of a chaotic 'no-deal' Brexit.  London insisted there was 'no prospect' of a Brexit deal unless the backstop was abandoned, after Brussels said Britain had still not come up with a workable alternative.  Johnson wrote to EU Council President Donald Tusk on Monday to insist that Britain could not accept what he called the 'anti-democratic' backstop, a mechanism to avoid border checks between EU-member Ireland and Northern Ireland, part of the UK.

    Britain and the EU clashed Tuesday over Prime Minister Boris Johnson's demand to scrap the Irish border backstop plan, as fears mount of a chaotic 'no-deal' Brexit. London insisted there was 'no prospect' of a Brexit deal unless the backstop was abandoned, after Brussels said Britain had still not come up with a workable alternative. Johnson wrote to EU Council President Donald Tusk on Monday to insist that Britain could not accept what he called the 'anti-democratic' backstop, a mechanism to avoid border checks between EU-member Ireland and Northern Ireland, part of the UK.


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  • 69/78   Democracy at Risk: How Distrust Is Eroding the American Way of Life
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The Gallup public opinion research organization reported recently that a mere 9 percent of Ukrainians have confidence in their national government. That’s the lowest confidence level in the world (for the second straight year). But if you think that makes Ukraine an outlier, then you are missing the bigger and more important picture: trust in public institutions is weak in many countries across the globe—including the United States, where trust in media, government and democratic norms have waned substantially in recent years. It’s a pervasive global problem that we can’t afford to ignore. There are many reasons for this perfect storm of distrust.First, over the last decade or more, the grip of elites on economic, political and social institutions has grown. Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson detailed in

    The Gallup public opinion research organization reported recently that a mere 9 percent of Ukrainians have confidence in their national government. That’s the lowest confidence level in the world (for the second straight year). But if you think that makes Ukraine an outlier, then you are missing the bigger and more important picture: trust in public institutions is weak in many countries across the globe—including the United States, where trust in media, government and democratic norms have waned substantially in recent years. It’s a pervasive global problem that we can’t afford to ignore. There are many reasons for this perfect storm of distrust.First, over the last decade or more, the grip of elites on economic, political and social institutions has grown. Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson detailed in "Why Nations Fail" how long-simmering anger at elites that organized society for their benefit powered the Arab Spring uprisings.Likewise, in many other developing and emerging market countries, getting an education, hospital care, police protection or other basic human services is often only possible when citizens offer bribes—again, something beyond the reach of most rank and file.That leads to a form of anger over state capture, or grand corruption, which Robert Klitgaard has summarized in a neat formula as: corruption = monopoly + discretion - accountability.Rising populist movements in countries such as Hungary, Poland, the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and France—all members (for now) of the European Union—are feeding off of a similar resentment of elites. These elites appear to be gaining as more modest, working class citizens, are losing economic, political and social ground. And the discontent that plunged the UK into the chaotic and still unresolved process of Brexit was fueled by a sense that the EU has undermined Britain’s capacity to control its own borders and sovereignty.In the United States, wealthier Americans can opt out of the comparatively plebian institutions of public schools (at nearly every level of education), Social Security, basic healthcare and, with elaborate legal avoidance schemes, taxes. Meanwhile, average Americans have increasingly taken prominent note of how the fortunes of the richest have risen much faster and higher than their own. Then there are the gated residential communities, their privileges on air travel and other supposedly public accommodations, and, in some high-profile cases, even relative impunity from criminal prosecution. There’s a very real sense that the game is rigged for the super-fortunate, who profit disproportionately from the hard work and public infrastructures that the less fortunate produce.We also got to this place because of a tenacious mantra, which gained momentum when Ronald Reagan became president: that public institutions—especially government—are the problem. It became an article of faith for many to devalue the work of government officials, to “starve the beast,” or, as anti-tax activist Grover Norquist famously put it, to “get [government] down to the size where we can drown it in the bathtub.”Entwined with all this is globalism and widely held perceptions that elites care more about people in supply chains in other countries than in their own.Many Americans support policies that emasculate free trade agreements, military alliances (such as NATO) and adoption of global environmental standards and that stem the flow of immigrants who appear to threaten native-born citizens economically and otherwise.So instead of offering refuge to those whose lives have been devastated by conflict and chaos in places such as Syria, the Sahel region of Africa, Central America and Venezuela, some citizens of would-be host countries (often those with the resources to do so) view them as threats, invaders, burdens. As German Chancellor Angele Merkel and other world leaders have discovered, compassion has its political price these days.What do we do about this?We’ve heard this for years, but it’s true: we need stronger “civic education.” We need to help people understand what it means to be a citizen and make them better and more discerning consumers of the services public institutions provide. Civic awareness and public engagement are at historic lows. A recent National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP, showed only 23 percent of eighth graders in the United States attained “proficient” status in civics.At a very basic level, democracy is nurtured by constantly “co-opting” the youngest members of society. There is evidence that effective civic education, through schools and with broader community support and parental involvement, serves as the foundation upon which trust and early formative political and civic participation are built. We also have evidence from the Untied States and the UK that, more broadly, education has a causal relationship to multiple forms of engagement, including voter turnout, group memberships, tolerance, and the acquisition of political knowledge (such as being a regular consumer of news media).While this may sound simplistic, finding and correctly processing information and general transparency builds trust in institutions. A 2017 social scientific study showed that, as people learn more about public institution, they form more nuanced perceptions of it that can lead them to distinguish it from other institutions for which they have little trust. Better provision of those services can make a difference. This means better infrastructure, more professionalism, more funding for greater capacity to deliver.That’s where the role of taxes and the government come in.There is a growing embrace these days in the idea that the private sector—business and nonprofit organizations—can and should play a bigger role in delivering the services everyone needs to survive and thrive. That accounts for the rise of corporate social responsibility activities, some of which do more to burnish the “do-good” reputation of the corporations than to do well by others, as Anand Giridharadas wrote in Winners Take All.Private sector engagement in the delivery of public and social services is admirable and valuable. But, as Giridharadas argues, it doesn’t go far enough to bring about the sort of transformation the world needs.Rather than farm public goods and services out to private providers, we must, instead, use governance mechanisms to achieve better outcomes for as many people as possible. When it has the resources, legitimacy and a sense of fairness, government is in the best position to make the kind of catalytic change that can lift all boats, not just those that are best positioned to rise higher than the others.Restoring trust in institutions is also about resources. Aging populations in Western societies put enormous pressures on national budgets already strained by social protection systems. Without right-sizing expectations about these protection systems or significantly reforming them, it is almost impossible to direct resources to the needs of other deserving public institutions of central government.The institutions of local government are increasingly seen as more responsive to their citizens. While we can debate the accuracy of this perception, it exposes them to increasing demands by citizens. These demands require resources, so they increasingly need to negotiate a reallocation of resources with cash-strapped central governments.Small “d” democratic good governance may have fallen down the popularity ladder, but so much depends upon it. Pandemics, unemployment, violent extremism are complex phenomena. But all are enabled and left unresolved by weak governance systems. That’s one reason why, when the Ebola virus appeared in West Africa, for example, the countries with at least some basic government capacity to fight it were spared the death and devastation we saw in the lesser-prepared countries of Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia. The private sector can support the strengthening of these systems, but it is unable to do so directly. Good governance, in part, is about good government, a very old concept. But the part that is directly correlated with trust in public institutions is its responsiveness to citizens, its fairness, its transparency and its inclusiveness.If you look across history at the polities that have had been more stable, prosperous, productive and enduring, you will see that they all had elements of good governance. In Renaissance Italy, many flourishing city states experimented with transparency tools; they hired professional city managers to minimize corruption. And there is mounting evidence that democracies, with citizen responsive institutions, consistently outperform autocracies in the developing world.There are no quick fixes to the crisis of trust that is sweeping the world today. It was years in the making and fed by a variety of factors that went unnoticed or unattended for too long. But there’s also no excuse for continuously turning a blind eye to the global trust crisis. We must examine it before really have no options to undo its damage and strengthen the institutions that are essential to healthy, well-functioning societies.Aleksander Dardeli is executive vice president for strategy and development at IREX, a global nonprofit organization that works to strengthen good governance and access to quality information and education.Image: Reuters


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  • 70/78   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 71/78   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 72/78   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 73/78   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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  • 74/78   Will Your Health Insurance Cover You Overseas?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...


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  • 75/78   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 76/78   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...


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  • 77/78   How to Get Kids to Wear Sunscreen
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Being a kid in the summer is often about playing outside, but if you don’t protect your child from the sun’s ultraviolet rays, he or she has a greater chance of developing skin cancer as an adult...

    Being a kid in the summer is often about playing outside, but if you don’t protect your child from the sun’s ultraviolet rays, he or she has a greater chance of developing skin cancer as an adult...


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  • 78/78   Get a Good Sunscreen at a Great Price
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    No doubt about it: If you’re using sunscreen properly, you’re going to go through a lot of it over the course of a summer. Let’s do the math. It takes a full ounce to cover your body, and you nee...

    No doubt about it: If you’re using sunscreen properly, you’re going to go through a lot of it over the course of a summer. Let’s do the math. It takes a full ounce to cover your body, and you nee...


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