News Photos

11/15/2019 14 hours

  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.


    Press Review


    Garrett   Myles   Pouncey   Happy Gilmore   Happy FriYAY   Burfict   Jhene   Marty McSorley   Helmet   Haynesworth   Suspend   Big Sean   None of Your Concern   The Take   Aaron Hernandez   Victory Friday   What Rudolph   Epicentre   Lyle Alzado   Happy Birthday Jeffree   Todd Bertuzzi   Derek Barnett   LAIC   Andre Johnson   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 20/79   Italy’s Saipem to Consider Combining With Rival Subsea 7
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Saipem SpA is considering a combination with rival Subsea 7 SA in what could rank as one of the European oil services industry’s biggest-ever deals, people with knowledge of the matter said.The Italian company is pursuing a potential transaction with Norway-listed Subsea 7 as it seeks to bulk up and weather an industry downturn, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because the information is private.Subsea 7, which has a market value of about $3.3 billion, rose as much as 8.4% in Oslo trading Friday for the biggest advance in more than two years. Saipem jumped as much as 5.3%. Both companies later pared their gains.Saipem, whose biggest shareholder is Italian energy giant Eni SpA, is valued at about $4.9 billion. No final decisions have been made, and there’s no certainty the deliberations will lead to a transaction, according to the people.Subsea 7 and Saipem have held talks about a merger in previous years, though they failed to reach an agreement, the people said. Representatives for Saipem, Subsea 7 and Eni declined to comment.Falling Oil PricesThe price of Brent crude has fallen about 28% from its October 2018 peak, which has driven companies in the sector to try and bulk up to cut costs, diversify and become more competitive. Oil services providers, which supply energy explorers and producers with equipment and expertise, have been hit hard by the drop in crude prices, as their clients have cut spending on everything from drilling rigs to support platforms.The recovery for the service companies from the depths of crude’s crash that started in 2014 has been slower than anticipated. Offshore rig company Northern Drilling Ltd. canceled a deal to buy a new drillship in October while Prosafe SE, which provides accommodation vessels, has struggled. TechnipFMC Plc, formed by the combination of two service providers during the downturn, last month signaled challenges for some of its units.Subsea 7, led by Chairman Kristian Siem, made a failed attempt last year to take over McDermott International Inc. for $2 billion. Since then Subsea 7 has made some smaller acquisitions in its effort to expand through dealmaking, buying technology provider 4Subsea in October for an undisclosed sum.General Electric Co. merged its oilfield-services arm with Baker Hughes Co. in 2017. John Wood Group Plc acquired Amec Foster Wheeler Plc for almost $3 billion in stock the same year.Saipem isn’t the only company from the Italian energy industry seeking growth abroad. This year, Eni and OMV AG acquired a $5.8 billion stake in Abu Dhabi National Oil Co.’s refining unit. Since 2000, Eni has racked up 10 acquisitions each worth at least $1 billion.(Adds background in the seventh paragraph. A previous version of this story was corrected to show Eni and OMV’s investment was in the refining unit of Adnoc.)\--With assistance from Kiel Porter.To contact the reporters on this story: Ed Hammond in New York at ehammond12@bloomberg.net;Daniele Lepido in Milan at dlepido1@bloomberg.net;Dinesh Nair in London at dnair5@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Scent at bscent@bloomberg.net, ;Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, ;Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Rakteem Katakey, James HerronFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Saipem SpA is considering a combination with rival Subsea 7 SA in what could rank as one of the European oil services industry’s biggest-ever deals, people with knowledge of the matter said.The Italian company is pursuing a potential transaction with Norway-listed Subsea 7 as it seeks to bulk up and weather an industry downturn, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because the information is private.Subsea 7, which has a market value of about $3.3 billion, rose as much as 8.4% in Oslo trading Friday for the biggest advance in more than two years. Saipem jumped as much as 5.3%. Both companies later pared their gains.Saipem, whose biggest shareholder is Italian energy giant Eni SpA, is valued at about $4.9 billion. No final decisions have been made, and there’s no certainty the deliberations will lead to a transaction, according to the people.Subsea 7 and Saipem have held talks about a merger in previous years, though they failed to reach an agreement, the people said. Representatives for Saipem, Subsea 7 and Eni declined to comment.Falling Oil PricesThe price of Brent crude has fallen about 28% from its October 2018 peak, which has driven companies in the sector to try and bulk up to cut costs, diversify and become more competitive. Oil services providers, which supply energy explorers and producers with equipment and expertise, have been hit hard by the drop in crude prices, as their clients have cut spending on everything from drilling rigs to support platforms.The recovery for the service companies from the depths of crude’s crash that started in 2014 has been slower than anticipated. Offshore rig company Northern Drilling Ltd. canceled a deal to buy a new drillship in October while Prosafe SE, which provides accommodation vessels, has struggled. TechnipFMC Plc, formed by the combination of two service providers during the downturn, last month signaled challenges for some of its units.Subsea 7, led by Chairman Kristian Siem, made a failed attempt last year to take over McDermott International Inc. for $2 billion. Since then Subsea 7 has made some smaller acquisitions in its effort to expand through dealmaking, buying technology provider 4Subsea in October for an undisclosed sum.General Electric Co. merged its oilfield-services arm with Baker Hughes Co. in 2017. John Wood Group Plc acquired Amec Foster Wheeler Plc for almost $3 billion in stock the same year.Saipem isn’t the only company from the Italian energy industry seeking growth abroad. This year, Eni and OMV AG acquired a $5.8 billion stake in Abu Dhabi National Oil Co.’s refining unit. Since 2000, Eni has racked up 10 acquisitions each worth at least $1 billion.(Adds background in the seventh paragraph. A previous version of this story was corrected to show Eni and OMV’s investment was in the refining unit of Adnoc.)\--With assistance from Kiel Porter.To contact the reporters on this story: Ed Hammond in New York at ehammond12@bloomberg.net;Daniele Lepido in Milan at dlepido1@bloomberg.net;Dinesh Nair in London at dnair5@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Scent at bscent@bloomberg.net, ;Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, ;Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Rakteem Katakey, James HerronFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 21/79   U.K. Labour Plans to Nationalize BT’s Broadband Unit
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Britain’s Labour party pledged to offer all consumers free fiber broadband within a decade by nationalizing phone carrier BT Group Plc’s Openreach unit at a cost of 20 billion pounds ($26 billion).BT shareholders would get newly-issued government bonds in return for their shares, Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer John McDonnell told BBC Radio Four on Friday. Shares of BT fell as much as 3.7%.It’s the biggest new pledge of the election campaign from Labour, which already has plans to nationalize the postal service, the railways and water and energy utilities. The broadband effort would be financed in part with taxes on multinational companies such as Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google. While the proposals may win over some voters, Labour may not be in a position to implement them. It has an average of 29% support in recent polls, trailing the Conservatives at 40%.“A Labour government will make broadband free for everybody,” party leader Jeremy Corbyn said at a campaign event at Lancaster University. “This is core infrastructure for the 21st century. It’s too important to be left to the corporations.”McDonnell said the new broadband pledge would be funded by asking “tech giants like Google and Facebook to pay a bit more” in proportion to their activities in the U.K. “So if a multinational has 10% of its sales, workforce, and operations in the U.K., they’re asked to pay tax on 10% of their global profits,” McDonnell said.While Labour puts the cost of the plan at about 20 billion pounds, BT’s Chief Executive Officer Philip Jansen said the proposal would cost almost five times that amount.BT shares were down 1.6% as of 12:29 p.m. in London, suggesting shareholders aren’t too worried about the nationalization risk. That gives the company a market value of about 19 billion pounds.“These are very very ambitious ideas,” Jansen said Friday in an interview on BBC Radio 4. “The Conservative Party have their own ambitious ideas for full fiber for everybody by 2025.”“How we do it is not straightforward, it needs funding,” Jansen said, putting the cost of such a roll-out over eight years at “not short of 100 billion pounds.”Lower Value?BT has been working to speed up its own full-fiber build and Jansen said the company’s shares have fallen on the recognition that “we’re going to be investing very very heavily.” Shareholders “are nursing massive losses on their investment” in BT if they’d bought it a few years ago, he said.Investors could get burned, as Openreach’s business would likely be undervalued in an expropriation, New Street analyst James Ratzer said in an email, adding that nationalization “rarely works well for shareholders.” Analysts at Jefferies put Openreach’s value at 13.5 billion pounds, flagging annual costs for operations and to service its high pension deficit.Labour’s McDonnell said the party has taken advice from lawyers to ensure its broadband plan fits within European Union state aid rules in case the U.K. is still in the bloc when the plans are carried out.Britain LaggingCorbyn’s plan is meant to solve a connectivity gap: Britain lags far behind other European nations when it comes to full-fiber coverage, which allows for gigabit-per-second download speeds. About 8% of the country is connected -- just under 2.5 million properties, according to a September report by communications regulator Ofcom. That compares with 63% for Spain and 86% for Portugal.As policymakers and regulators have been creating conditions to spur more competition with BT, rivals including Liberty Global Plc’s Virgin Media and Goldman Sachs Group Inc.-backed CityFibre have been jumping in to commit billions of pounds to infrastructure plans.“Those plans risk being shelved overnight,” Matthew Howett, an analyst at Assembly, said in an email. “This is a spectacularly bad take by the Labour Party.”The Labour announcement caused TalkTalk Telecom Group Plc to pause talks to sell a fiber project as the industry seeks clarity.Analysts are skeptical the government could roll out fiber more effectively than private industry and Howett pointed to delays and budget overruns from a state-led effort in Australia.It’s not the first time radical ideas have been proposed for BT’s Openreach unit, a national network of copper wire and fiber-optic cable that communication providers including BT, Comcast Corp.’s Sky and Vodafone Group Plc tap into to provide home internet to customers.BT was forced to legally separate the division from the rest of the company in recent years over concerns about competition, and that it wasn’t investing fast enough to roll out fiber, and some investors have suggested the company should fully spin it out into an independent, listed business to unlock value.‘Fantasy’ PlanNicky Morgan, the Conservative cabinet minister with responsibility for digital services, dismissed Corbyn’s plan in a statement as a “fantasy” that “would cost hardworking taxpayers tens of billions” of pounds.The Conservative Party’s own proposal for full-fiber broadband across the U.K. by 2025 -- eight years ahead of a previous government goal -- has raised eyebrows across the telecom industry, as some executives and analysts expressed skepticism about whether it’s doable, whether there’s consumer demand for the ultrafast internet service and how companies would make money.‘A Disaster’TechUK, the industry’s main trade body, called Labour’s plan “a disaster” for the telecom sector. “Renationalization would immediately halt the investment being driven not just by BT but the growing number of new and innovative companies that compete with BT,” said Chief Executive Officer Julian David.The announcement will provide more fodder for the arguments by Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives that a Labour government risks plunging the country into an economic crisis. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid over the weekend released analysis estimating Labour would raise spending by 1.2 trillion pounds over five years. McDonnell at the time called it “fake news.”McDonnell told the BBC that Parliament would set the value of Openreach when it’s taken into public ownership and that shareholders would be compensated with government bonds. He said the expenditure was needed because only 10% to 12% of the country has coverage now, compared with near complete coverage in Japan and South Korea.Under Labour’s plan, the roll-out would begin in areas with the worst broadband access, including rural communities, followed by towns and then by areas that are currently well-served by fast broadband.According to elections expert John Curtice, Corbyn’s chances of forming a majority government are “as close to zero” as it’s possible to get. The election is still hard to predict, and it is possible that Labour could yet win power, either on its own or with the support of smaller parties.(Updates with Corbyn remarks in fourth paragraph, McDonnell in fifth.)\--With assistance from Jennifer Ryan and Kit Rees.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Thomas Seal in London at tseal@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, ;Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Frank ConnellyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Britain’s Labour party pledged to offer all consumers free fiber broadband within a decade by nationalizing phone carrier BT Group Plc’s Openreach unit at a cost of 20 billion pounds ($26 billion).BT shareholders would get newly-issued government bonds in return for their shares, Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer John McDonnell told BBC Radio Four on Friday. Shares of BT fell as much as 3.7%.It’s the biggest new pledge of the election campaign from Labour, which already has plans to nationalize the postal service, the railways and water and energy utilities. The broadband effort would be financed in part with taxes on multinational companies such as Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google. While the proposals may win over some voters, Labour may not be in a position to implement them. It has an average of 29% support in recent polls, trailing the Conservatives at 40%.“A Labour government will make broadband free for everybody,” party leader Jeremy Corbyn said at a campaign event at Lancaster University. “This is core infrastructure for the 21st century. It’s too important to be left to the corporations.”McDonnell said the new broadband pledge would be funded by asking “tech giants like Google and Facebook to pay a bit more” in proportion to their activities in the U.K. “So if a multinational has 10% of its sales, workforce, and operations in the U.K., they’re asked to pay tax on 10% of their global profits,” McDonnell said.While Labour puts the cost of the plan at about 20 billion pounds, BT’s Chief Executive Officer Philip Jansen said the proposal would cost almost five times that amount.BT shares were down 1.6% as of 12:29 p.m. in London, suggesting shareholders aren’t too worried about the nationalization risk. That gives the company a market value of about 19 billion pounds.“These are very very ambitious ideas,” Jansen said Friday in an interview on BBC Radio 4. “The Conservative Party have their own ambitious ideas for full fiber for everybody by 2025.”“How we do it is not straightforward, it needs funding,” Jansen said, putting the cost of such a roll-out over eight years at “not short of 100 billion pounds.”Lower Value?BT has been working to speed up its own full-fiber build and Jansen said the company’s shares have fallen on the recognition that “we’re going to be investing very very heavily.” Shareholders “are nursing massive losses on their investment” in BT if they’d bought it a few years ago, he said.Investors could get burned, as Openreach’s business would likely be undervalued in an expropriation, New Street analyst James Ratzer said in an email, adding that nationalization “rarely works well for shareholders.” Analysts at Jefferies put Openreach’s value at 13.5 billion pounds, flagging annual costs for operations and to service its high pension deficit.Labour’s McDonnell said the party has taken advice from lawyers to ensure its broadband plan fits within European Union state aid rules in case the U.K. is still in the bloc when the plans are carried out.Britain LaggingCorbyn’s plan is meant to solve a connectivity gap: Britain lags far behind other European nations when it comes to full-fiber coverage, which allows for gigabit-per-second download speeds. About 8% of the country is connected -- just under 2.5 million properties, according to a September report by communications regulator Ofcom. That compares with 63% for Spain and 86% for Portugal.As policymakers and regulators have been creating conditions to spur more competition with BT, rivals including Liberty Global Plc’s Virgin Media and Goldman Sachs Group Inc.-backed CityFibre have been jumping in to commit billions of pounds to infrastructure plans.“Those plans risk being shelved overnight,” Matthew Howett, an analyst at Assembly, said in an email. “This is a spectacularly bad take by the Labour Party.”The Labour announcement caused TalkTalk Telecom Group Plc to pause talks to sell a fiber project as the industry seeks clarity.Analysts are skeptical the government could roll out fiber more effectively than private industry and Howett pointed to delays and budget overruns from a state-led effort in Australia.It’s not the first time radical ideas have been proposed for BT’s Openreach unit, a national network of copper wire and fiber-optic cable that communication providers including BT, Comcast Corp.’s Sky and Vodafone Group Plc tap into to provide home internet to customers.BT was forced to legally separate the division from the rest of the company in recent years over concerns about competition, and that it wasn’t investing fast enough to roll out fiber, and some investors have suggested the company should fully spin it out into an independent, listed business to unlock value.‘Fantasy’ PlanNicky Morgan, the Conservative cabinet minister with responsibility for digital services, dismissed Corbyn’s plan in a statement as a “fantasy” that “would cost hardworking taxpayers tens of billions” of pounds.The Conservative Party’s own proposal for full-fiber broadband across the U.K. by 2025 -- eight years ahead of a previous government goal -- has raised eyebrows across the telecom industry, as some executives and analysts expressed skepticism about whether it’s doable, whether there’s consumer demand for the ultrafast internet service and how companies would make money.‘A Disaster’TechUK, the industry’s main trade body, called Labour’s plan “a disaster” for the telecom sector. “Renationalization would immediately halt the investment being driven not just by BT but the growing number of new and innovative companies that compete with BT,” said Chief Executive Officer Julian David.The announcement will provide more fodder for the arguments by Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives that a Labour government risks plunging the country into an economic crisis. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid over the weekend released analysis estimating Labour would raise spending by 1.2 trillion pounds over five years. McDonnell at the time called it “fake news.”McDonnell told the BBC that Parliament would set the value of Openreach when it’s taken into public ownership and that shareholders would be compensated with government bonds. He said the expenditure was needed because only 10% to 12% of the country has coverage now, compared with near complete coverage in Japan and South Korea.Under Labour’s plan, the roll-out would begin in areas with the worst broadband access, including rural communities, followed by towns and then by areas that are currently well-served by fast broadband.According to elections expert John Curtice, Corbyn’s chances of forming a majority government are “as close to zero” as it’s possible to get. The election is still hard to predict, and it is possible that Labour could yet win power, either on its own or with the support of smaller parties.(Updates with Corbyn remarks in fourth paragraph, McDonnell in fifth.)\--With assistance from Jennifer Ryan and Kit Rees.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Thomas Seal in London at tseal@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, ;Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Frank ConnellyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 22/79   Edgewell Personal Care Company Just Released Its Annual Earnings: Here's What Analysts Think
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It's been a sad week for Edgewell Personal Care Company (NYSE:EPC), who've watched their investment drop 16% to...

    It's been a sad week for Edgewell Personal Care Company (NYSE:EPC), who've watched their investment drop 16% to...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 23/79   Are Investors Undervaluing Stericycle, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRCL) By 25%?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Stericycle, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRCL) by taking the...

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Stericycle, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRCL) by taking the...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 24/79   Is OSE Immunotherapeutics (EPA:OSE) Using Debt In A Risky Way?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says...

    The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 25/79   Does GPI SpA (BIT:GPI) Have A Good P/E Ratio?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll show how you can...

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll show how you can...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 26/79   Electromed, Inc. Beat Analyst Estimates: See What The Consensus Is Forecasting For Next Year
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A week ago, Electromed, Inc. (NYSEMKT:ELMD) came out with a strong set of first-quarter numbers that could potentially...

    A week ago, Electromed, Inc. (NYSEMKT:ELMD) came out with a strong set of first-quarter numbers that could potentially...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 27/79   What Kind Of Shareholders Own TKH Group N.V. (AMS:TWEKA)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The big shareholder groups in TKH Group N.V. (AMS:TWEKA) have power over the company. Institutions often own shares in...

    The big shareholder groups in TKH Group N.V. (AMS:TWEKA) have power over the company. Institutions often own shares in...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 28/79   Here's How We Evaluate The Progressive Corporation's (NYSE:PGR) Dividend
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Could The Progressive Corporation (NYSE:PGR) be an attractive dividend share to own for the long haul? Investors are...

    Could The Progressive Corporation (NYSE:PGR) be an attractive dividend share to own for the long haul? Investors are...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 29/79   Vitamin E acetate, used in THC vaping, is dangerous and can kill. So why isn't it banned?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Vitamin E acetate is sometimes used as to dilute THC oil in vape cartridges to make it go further. It can be deadly, but it's not banned everywhere.

    Vitamin E acetate is sometimes used as to dilute THC oil in vape cartridges to make it go further. It can be deadly, but it's not banned everywhere.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 30/79   A Look At The Intrinsic Value Of OEM International AB (publ) (STO:OEM B)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of OEM International AB (publ) (STO:OEM B) by...

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of OEM International AB (publ) (STO:OEM B) by...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 31/79   Analysts Have Been Trimming Their Dynatronics Corporation Price Target After Its Latest Report
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Last week, you might have seen that Dynatronics Corporation (NASDAQ:DYNT) released its quarterly result to the market...

    Last week, you might have seen that Dynatronics Corporation (NASDAQ:DYNT) released its quarterly result to the market...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 32/79   A Look At The Fair Value Of dormakaba Holding AG (VTX:DOKA)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of dormakaba Holding AG (VTX:DOKA) by estimating...

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of dormakaba Holding AG (VTX:DOKA) by estimating...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 33/79   How Does Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC) Stand Up To These Simple Dividend Safety Checks?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Dividend paying stocks like Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason...

    Dividend paying stocks like Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 34/79   If You Had Bought ORPEA Société Anonyme (EPA:ORP) Shares Five Years Ago You'd Have Made 121%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The worst result, after buying shares in a company (assuming no leverage), would be if you lose all the money you put...

    The worst result, after buying shares in a company (assuming no leverage), would be if you lose all the money you put...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 35/79   Ukraine adviser: excluding foreigners from buying land will hurt growth
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Ukraine's chief economic adviser has told Reuters the government's decision not to let foreigners take advantage once a ban on selling farmland is lifted next year will slow investment, help local oligarchs and hurt growth.  Investors are watching President Volodymyr Zelenskiy's approach to land reform as an indicator of his commitment to a reform agenda that carried him to a landslide election victory in April.  Zelenskiy's party is pushing legislation through parliament to remove a moratorium on the sale of agricultural land that has stood since 2001.

    Ukraine's chief economic adviser has told Reuters the government's decision not to let foreigners take advantage once a ban on selling farmland is lifted next year will slow investment, help local oligarchs and hurt growth. Investors are watching President Volodymyr Zelenskiy's approach to land reform as an indicator of his commitment to a reform agenda that carried him to a landslide election victory in April. Zelenskiy's party is pushing legislation through parliament to remove a moratorium on the sale of agricultural land that has stood since 2001.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 36/79   U.S. companies say consumer still strong even as broader outlook dims
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Walmart became the latest company to point to a strong U.S. consumer, adding to a raft of firms in recent weeks citing healthy demand at a time when spending is seen as an increasingly key support for the economy.  Several companies including banks and homebuilders have painted an upbeat picture of consumer health in conference calls this reporting season, even as many firms have offered more dour outlooks especially given the lingering U.S.-China trade war.  Reports of strong demand from companies are a welcome sign to some in the market amid weakening manufacturing activity and a slump in business investment.

    Walmart became the latest company to point to a strong U.S. consumer, adding to a raft of firms in recent weeks citing healthy demand at a time when spending is seen as an increasingly key support for the economy. Several companies including banks and homebuilders have painted an upbeat picture of consumer health in conference calls this reporting season, even as many firms have offered more dour outlooks especially given the lingering U.S.-China trade war. Reports of strong demand from companies are a welcome sign to some in the market amid weakening manufacturing activity and a slump in business investment.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 37/79   Labour Vows Free Internet, Johnson Defends Flood Aid: U.K. Election Update
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn pledged free high-speed broadband for all with a 20 billion pound ($26 billion) plan to nationalize BT Group Plc’s Openreach unit, paying for the proposal with taxes on tech companies including Facebook and Google. The party’s most striking move of the election campaign overshadowed Boris Johnson’s attempts to woo voters with a promise to reinvigorate down-at-heel towns.In two appearances on the BBC on Friday, the prime minister defended his government’s response to the flooding in northern England and promised to boost the state-run National Health Service, where patients are facing record waiting times. He also said the Conservatives would cut unskilled immigration.Read more: Battle Lines Are Drawn in Boris Johnson’s Big Election GambleKey Developments:Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell says BT shareholders would receive government bonds as compensation; Corbyn and McDonnell are appearing at a campaign event in northwest England.Johnson says no evidence of Russian meddling in U.K. politics; also tells BBC radio he’s “not 100% behind” the HS2 rail projectLiberal Democrats finance spokesman Ed Davey will give a speech on the party’s economic plans at 3 p.m, including a pledge to spend an extra 100 billion pounds over 5 years to tackle climate changeA YouGov poll found more Britons identify themselves by their Brexit stance than by political allegianceCorbyn ‘Not Planning’ on Coalition Government (12:25 p.m.)Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn insisted he isn’t aiming to take power in coalition with another party, but his comments did not rule out such an option.“We are not planning to go into coalition with anybody,” Corbyn said. He ruled out a deal with a political party that supports austerity measures. His answer leaves the door open to a potential power-sharing deal with groups such as the Scottish National Party if Labour do not win an outright majority in the Dec. 12 election.The SNP -- which wants to end austerity -- has said it would support a Corbyn premiership if he backed another referendum on Scotland becoming independent from the rest of the U.K.Polling experts believe Labour has almost zero chance of winning a majority, so would need to rely on support from other parties to form a government.Broadband Plan OK With EU, McDonnell Says (12:15 p.m.)Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell said the party has taken advice from lawyers to ensure its broadband plan fits within EU State Aid rules in case the U.K. is still in the EU when the plans are carried out.The plans are “perfectly compatible” with EU rules, McDonnell said. The advice matters because Labour has offered a referendum on any new Brexit deal it negotiates with Brussels and has to plan for the possibility that voters might opt to stay in the bloc.Earlier on Friday Ireland won EU approval to spend 2.6 billion euros to roll out high-speed internet and connect areas where private operators have no interest in investing. While the EU frowns on subsidies that crowd out private investment, it cleared the Irish subsidies for areas “where no private investor has demonstrated a concrete plan to invest commercially in the near future.”The subsidized network will offer access to all operators to try and entice more internet providers into the market. Ireland now intends to reach 100% high-speed coverage at upload speeds of at least 30 Mbps and downloads of 150 Mbps.Tax Should Relate to U.K. Activities, McDonnell Says (12 p.m.)Labour economy spokesman John McDonnell confirmed the new broadband pledge would be funded by asking “tech giants like Google and Facebook to pay a bit more” in proportion to their activities in the U.K.“The maintenance costs of the network, around £230 million a year, will be more than covered by a new approach to taxing multinationals that we welcomed several weeks ago,” he said. He was referring to a report by Public Services International last month which proposes multinational firms should be taxed based on the number of employees and assets they have in the U.K., as well as their sales in the country.“So if a multinational has 10% of its sales, workforce, and operations in the U.K., they’re asked to pay tax on 10% of their global profits,” McDonnell said.Corbyn: Broadband Will be Like 21st Century NHS (11:35 a.m.)Jeremy Corbyn said technology companies need to be “paying their fair share” for public services in the U.K. and compared the provision of universal free broadband to the delivery of free healthcare by the National Health Service, created in 1948 under a Labour government.“As a country, we should be proud of our history of building treasured public institutions and services,” he said. “In the 19th century, it was the public water supply and waterworks. In the 20th century, it was our fantastic National Health Service, freeing people from the fear of having to pay for ill health and illnesses. British Broadband will be our treasured public institution of the 21st century, delivering a fast and free broadband to every single home.”Tech companies “believe they can get away with not paying their share, but I have a message for them, not any more,” he said. “Making broadband free and available to all will open up opportunities for everybody, it will put us at the cutting edge of social and economic change.”Corbyn Pledges Broadband as Public Service (11:25 a.m.)Jeremy Corbyn said a new nationalized company, “British Broadband” will provide free broadband access across the whole of the U.K. and taxes tech companies, including Google and Facebook, will pay for it.“A Labour government will make broadband free for everybody. And not just any broadband, but the very fastest full fiber broadband to every home in every part of our country for free as a universal public service,” Corbyn said at a campaign event at Lancaster University. “We’ll tax the giant corporations fairly, that includes Facebook and Google. That will help to cover the running cost of this.”“This is core infrastructure for the 21st century. It’s too important to be left to the corporations,” Corbyn said. “The most efficient and rapid way to deliver a broadband network for our times is for the public to take control of it. We will make a new public enterprise and call it British Broadband.”Johnson ‘Not 100% Behind’ HS2 Rail Project (10:20 a.m.)Boris Johnson said he “is not 100% behind” the High Speed 2 rail line project between London and northern England because of its “mounting” cost. The HS2 railway line is estimated to cost 88 billion pounds now, Johnson told BBC Radio 5, and “could be north of 100 billion by the time it’s finished.”“It’s only responsible to look at whether that money is going to be sensibly spent,” Johnson said. But he added: “When it comes to a big choice to our country about whether or not just to scrap something of potential national importance, a big piece of infrastructure, I really do hesitate.”Johnson said he will wait for the official review of the project to be published -- after the election -- before making a final decision.Johnson: No Evidence of Russian Interference (10 a.m.)Boris Johnson said “there is no evidence” of Russian interference in British politics, and sees “absolutely no reason” why a report on the subject should be published before the Dec. 12 election.Politicians from across the spectrum -- including former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton -- have called for the parliamentary report, which has been cleared for publication by the security services, to be made public.“I see absolutely no reason to change the normal procedures for publishing ISC reports just because there’s an election,” Johnson said in a BBC radio phone-in show. Asked about Russian interference, he said: “There is no evidence for that, we have to be very careful before we cast aspersions on people because of their nationality.”Johnson said all donations to his Conservative Party by Russian oligarchs have been “properly vetted and properly published.”Johnson Denies Farage Job Offer Claim (9:45 a.m.)Boris Johnson denied that his party offered peerages to persuade Brexit Party candidates to stand down, a claim made late Thursday by Nigel Farage.“No, nein,” Johnson said on BBC Radio 5. “What is this nonsense.”Johnson was then asked if Conservative Party officials had made calls to Brexit Party candidates. “That would be a big thing for me to investigate -- I’m sure conversations take place between politicians of all parties,” he said. “But certainly nobody has been offered a peerage, I can tell you that.”Farage said Thursday his Brexit Party candidates “are now coming under relentless phone calls, emails and abuse and being told they should stand down.” He also repeated his claim that he has been offered a seat in the House of Lords. The Tories denied the allegations.Things Get Personal for Johnson (8:35 a.m.)Boris Johnson endured some uncomfortable minutes at the end of his interview with the BBC on Friday, when questions turned to his hobbies, family and character. Specifically, he was asked how families could relate to him given his privileged background.“That’s a matter for other people,” Johnson said, looking visibly flustered. The BBC showed widely ridiculed footage of the prime minister trying to mop a shop floor that was inundated in the recent flooding. He also got bogged down on a question about how he makes tea.“I’ve had a very happy and wonderful life, in many many ways,” Johnson said. “My parents gave me fantastic opportunities ... What I want is for every child in this country to have a sense they can achieve their full potential.”Johnson Pledges to Cut Immigration (8:30 a.m.)Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he thinks immigration can be “a wonderful thing” but said rates in the U.K. “have been very high” and committed his Conservative Party to reducing the number of unskilled immigrants if it wins a parliamentary majority on Dec. 12.“I’m a pro-immigration politician,” Johnson said in a BBC TV interview on Friday. “But what we will be able to do once we come out of the EU in January, once we get Brexit done, is we will be able to take back control of our borders.” Unskilled migrants have depressed wages in the U.K., he said, adding that a Tory government would reduce their number and -- by extension -- the overall figures. He declined to give a target.Johnson also defended his Conservative Party’s record with the state-run National Health Service, which this week reported its worst-ever waiting times for patients. “The NHS is facing massive demand,” Johnson said. Like Health Secretary Matt Hancock on Thursday, Johnson then tried to turn the issue onto Labour -- which has been out of power for nine years -- saying the party’s spending plans would make it impossible to run sustainable public services.Labour to Offer Bonds for BT Shares (8:20 a.m.)The Labour Party said BT shareholders will receive government bonds as compensation under its plan to nationalize the company’s broadband unit.“I don’t believe anyone will lose out from this,” Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell said on BBC Radio 4 on Friday. McDonnell also announced the party’s intention to reach a “working agreement” with other telecommunications firms for access arrangements, and said this is the “limit” of Labour’s nationalization plans for the sector.The 20 billion pound plan to deliver free full-fiber broadband for everyone within 10 years is the biggest pledge yet of the campaign from Labour, which already has plans to nationalize the postal service, the railways and some utilities. BT shares fell as much as 3.7% after the announcement.Read more: U.K. Labour Plans to Nationalize BT’s Broadband UnitEarlier:Johnson Pledges Cash to Boost High Streets in ‘Overlooked’ TownsBattle Lines Are Drawn in Boris Johnson’s Big Election GambleJeremy Corbyn Isn’t Just a Danger to Business: Therese RaphaelCorbyn Vows Nationalization of BT Broadband: U.K. Campaign Trail\--With assistance from Thomas Penny, Aoife White and Tiago Ramos Alfaro.To contact the reporters on this story: Greg Ritchie in London at gritchie10@bloomberg.net;Joe Mayes in London at jmayes9@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn pledged free high-speed broadband for all with a 20 billion pound ($26 billion) plan to nationalize BT Group Plc’s Openreach unit, paying for the proposal with taxes on tech companies including Facebook and Google. The party’s most striking move of the election campaign overshadowed Boris Johnson’s attempts to woo voters with a promise to reinvigorate down-at-heel towns.In two appearances on the BBC on Friday, the prime minister defended his government’s response to the flooding in northern England and promised to boost the state-run National Health Service, where patients are facing record waiting times. He also said the Conservatives would cut unskilled immigration.Read more: Battle Lines Are Drawn in Boris Johnson’s Big Election GambleKey Developments:Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell says BT shareholders would receive government bonds as compensation; Corbyn and McDonnell are appearing at a campaign event in northwest England.Johnson says no evidence of Russian meddling in U.K. politics; also tells BBC radio he’s “not 100% behind” the HS2 rail projectLiberal Democrats finance spokesman Ed Davey will give a speech on the party’s economic plans at 3 p.m, including a pledge to spend an extra 100 billion pounds over 5 years to tackle climate changeA YouGov poll found more Britons identify themselves by their Brexit stance than by political allegianceCorbyn ‘Not Planning’ on Coalition Government (12:25 p.m.)Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn insisted he isn’t aiming to take power in coalition with another party, but his comments did not rule out such an option.“We are not planning to go into coalition with anybody,” Corbyn said. He ruled out a deal with a political party that supports austerity measures. His answer leaves the door open to a potential power-sharing deal with groups such as the Scottish National Party if Labour do not win an outright majority in the Dec. 12 election.The SNP -- which wants to end austerity -- has said it would support a Corbyn premiership if he backed another referendum on Scotland becoming independent from the rest of the U.K.Polling experts believe Labour has almost zero chance of winning a majority, so would need to rely on support from other parties to form a government.Broadband Plan OK With EU, McDonnell Says (12:15 p.m.)Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell said the party has taken advice from lawyers to ensure its broadband plan fits within EU State Aid rules in case the U.K. is still in the EU when the plans are carried out.The plans are “perfectly compatible” with EU rules, McDonnell said. The advice matters because Labour has offered a referendum on any new Brexit deal it negotiates with Brussels and has to plan for the possibility that voters might opt to stay in the bloc.Earlier on Friday Ireland won EU approval to spend 2.6 billion euros to roll out high-speed internet and connect areas where private operators have no interest in investing. While the EU frowns on subsidies that crowd out private investment, it cleared the Irish subsidies for areas “where no private investor has demonstrated a concrete plan to invest commercially in the near future.”The subsidized network will offer access to all operators to try and entice more internet providers into the market. Ireland now intends to reach 100% high-speed coverage at upload speeds of at least 30 Mbps and downloads of 150 Mbps.Tax Should Relate to U.K. Activities, McDonnell Says (12 p.m.)Labour economy spokesman John McDonnell confirmed the new broadband pledge would be funded by asking “tech giants like Google and Facebook to pay a bit more” in proportion to their activities in the U.K.“The maintenance costs of the network, around £230 million a year, will be more than covered by a new approach to taxing multinationals that we welcomed several weeks ago,” he said. He was referring to a report by Public Services International last month which proposes multinational firms should be taxed based on the number of employees and assets they have in the U.K., as well as their sales in the country.“So if a multinational has 10% of its sales, workforce, and operations in the U.K., they’re asked to pay tax on 10% of their global profits,” McDonnell said.Corbyn: Broadband Will be Like 21st Century NHS (11:35 a.m.)Jeremy Corbyn said technology companies need to be “paying their fair share” for public services in the U.K. and compared the provision of universal free broadband to the delivery of free healthcare by the National Health Service, created in 1948 under a Labour government.“As a country, we should be proud of our history of building treasured public institutions and services,” he said. “In the 19th century, it was the public water supply and waterworks. In the 20th century, it was our fantastic National Health Service, freeing people from the fear of having to pay for ill health and illnesses. British Broadband will be our treasured public institution of the 21st century, delivering a fast and free broadband to every single home.”Tech companies “believe they can get away with not paying their share, but I have a message for them, not any more,” he said. “Making broadband free and available to all will open up opportunities for everybody, it will put us at the cutting edge of social and economic change.”Corbyn Pledges Broadband as Public Service (11:25 a.m.)Jeremy Corbyn said a new nationalized company, “British Broadband” will provide free broadband access across the whole of the U.K. and taxes tech companies, including Google and Facebook, will pay for it.“A Labour government will make broadband free for everybody. And not just any broadband, but the very fastest full fiber broadband to every home in every part of our country for free as a universal public service,” Corbyn said at a campaign event at Lancaster University. “We’ll tax the giant corporations fairly, that includes Facebook and Google. That will help to cover the running cost of this.”“This is core infrastructure for the 21st century. It’s too important to be left to the corporations,” Corbyn said. “The most efficient and rapid way to deliver a broadband network for our times is for the public to take control of it. We will make a new public enterprise and call it British Broadband.”Johnson ‘Not 100% Behind’ HS2 Rail Project (10:20 a.m.)Boris Johnson said he “is not 100% behind” the High Speed 2 rail line project between London and northern England because of its “mounting” cost. The HS2 railway line is estimated to cost 88 billion pounds now, Johnson told BBC Radio 5, and “could be north of 100 billion by the time it’s finished.”“It’s only responsible to look at whether that money is going to be sensibly spent,” Johnson said. But he added: “When it comes to a big choice to our country about whether or not just to scrap something of potential national importance, a big piece of infrastructure, I really do hesitate.”Johnson said he will wait for the official review of the project to be published -- after the election -- before making a final decision.Johnson: No Evidence of Russian Interference (10 a.m.)Boris Johnson said “there is no evidence” of Russian interference in British politics, and sees “absolutely no reason” why a report on the subject should be published before the Dec. 12 election.Politicians from across the spectrum -- including former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton -- have called for the parliamentary report, which has been cleared for publication by the security services, to be made public.“I see absolutely no reason to change the normal procedures for publishing ISC reports just because there’s an election,” Johnson said in a BBC radio phone-in show. Asked about Russian interference, he said: “There is no evidence for that, we have to be very careful before we cast aspersions on people because of their nationality.”Johnson said all donations to his Conservative Party by Russian oligarchs have been “properly vetted and properly published.”Johnson Denies Farage Job Offer Claim (9:45 a.m.)Boris Johnson denied that his party offered peerages to persuade Brexit Party candidates to stand down, a claim made late Thursday by Nigel Farage.“No, nein,” Johnson said on BBC Radio 5. “What is this nonsense.”Johnson was then asked if Conservative Party officials had made calls to Brexit Party candidates. “That would be a big thing for me to investigate -- I’m sure conversations take place between politicians of all parties,” he said. “But certainly nobody has been offered a peerage, I can tell you that.”Farage said Thursday his Brexit Party candidates “are now coming under relentless phone calls, emails and abuse and being told they should stand down.” He also repeated his claim that he has been offered a seat in the House of Lords. The Tories denied the allegations.Things Get Personal for Johnson (8:35 a.m.)Boris Johnson endured some uncomfortable minutes at the end of his interview with the BBC on Friday, when questions turned to his hobbies, family and character. Specifically, he was asked how families could relate to him given his privileged background.“That’s a matter for other people,” Johnson said, looking visibly flustered. The BBC showed widely ridiculed footage of the prime minister trying to mop a shop floor that was inundated in the recent flooding. He also got bogged down on a question about how he makes tea.“I’ve had a very happy and wonderful life, in many many ways,” Johnson said. “My parents gave me fantastic opportunities ... What I want is for every child in this country to have a sense they can achieve their full potential.”Johnson Pledges to Cut Immigration (8:30 a.m.)Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he thinks immigration can be “a wonderful thing” but said rates in the U.K. “have been very high” and committed his Conservative Party to reducing the number of unskilled immigrants if it wins a parliamentary majority on Dec. 12.“I’m a pro-immigration politician,” Johnson said in a BBC TV interview on Friday. “But what we will be able to do once we come out of the EU in January, once we get Brexit done, is we will be able to take back control of our borders.” Unskilled migrants have depressed wages in the U.K., he said, adding that a Tory government would reduce their number and -- by extension -- the overall figures. He declined to give a target.Johnson also defended his Conservative Party’s record with the state-run National Health Service, which this week reported its worst-ever waiting times for patients. “The NHS is facing massive demand,” Johnson said. Like Health Secretary Matt Hancock on Thursday, Johnson then tried to turn the issue onto Labour -- which has been out of power for nine years -- saying the party’s spending plans would make it impossible to run sustainable public services.Labour to Offer Bonds for BT Shares (8:20 a.m.)The Labour Party said BT shareholders will receive government bonds as compensation under its plan to nationalize the company’s broadband unit.“I don’t believe anyone will lose out from this,” Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell said on BBC Radio 4 on Friday. McDonnell also announced the party’s intention to reach a “working agreement” with other telecommunications firms for access arrangements, and said this is the “limit” of Labour’s nationalization plans for the sector.The 20 billion pound plan to deliver free full-fiber broadband for everyone within 10 years is the biggest pledge yet of the campaign from Labour, which already has plans to nationalize the postal service, the railways and some utilities. BT shares fell as much as 3.7% after the announcement.Read more: U.K. Labour Plans to Nationalize BT’s Broadband UnitEarlier:Johnson Pledges Cash to Boost High Streets in ‘Overlooked’ TownsBattle Lines Are Drawn in Boris Johnson’s Big Election GambleJeremy Corbyn Isn’t Just a Danger to Business: Therese RaphaelCorbyn Vows Nationalization of BT Broadband: U.K. Campaign Trail\--With assistance from Thomas Penny, Aoife White and Tiago Ramos Alfaro.To contact the reporters on this story: Greg Ritchie in London at gritchie10@bloomberg.net;Joe Mayes in London at jmayes9@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 38/79   Is Enlabs AB (publ)'s (STO:NLAB) 25% ROE Better Than Average?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 39/79   Earnings Miss: Loblaw Companies Limited Missed EPS By 39% And Analysts Are Revising Their Forecasts
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    As you might know, Loblaw Companies Limited (TSE:L) recently reported its third-quarter numbers. It looks like a...

    As you might know, Loblaw Companies Limited (TSE:L) recently reported its third-quarter numbers. It looks like a...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 40/79   Sorry, Hillary: Democrats don't need a savior
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    With the Iowa caucuses fast approaching, Hillary Clinton is just the latest in the colorful cast of characters who seem to have surveyed the sprawling Democratic field, sensed something lacking and decided that “something” might be them.

    With the Iowa caucuses fast approaching, Hillary Clinton is just the latest in the colorful cast of characters who seem to have surveyed the sprawling Democratic field, sensed something lacking and decided that “something” might be them.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 41/79   Immigration officer blows whistle on 'morally objectionable' Trump asylum policy
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A new anonymous whistleblower has accused the Trump administration of requiring U.S. asylum officers to enforce an illegal and immoral policy “clearly designed to further this administration's racist agenda of keeping Hispanic and Latino populations from entering the United States.”

    A new anonymous whistleblower has accused the Trump administration of requiring U.S. asylum officers to enforce an illegal and immoral policy “clearly designed to further this administration's racist agenda of keeping Hispanic and Latino populations from entering the United States.”


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 42/79   Colorado officers who shot black teenager won’t be charged
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A grand jury found that two Colorado police officers were justified in killing a black teenager who was shot multiple times in the back during a foot chase, the district attorney said Wednesday.  As a result, no criminal charges will be filed against the officers involved in the Aug. 3 death of De'Von Bailey in Colorado Springs, KRDO reported, citing El Paso County District Attorney Dan May.  Bailey, 19, was shot three times in the back and once in the arm.

    A grand jury found that two Colorado police officers were justified in killing a black teenager who was shot multiple times in the back during a foot chase, the district attorney said Wednesday. As a result, no criminal charges will be filed against the officers involved in the Aug. 3 death of De'Von Bailey in Colorado Springs, KRDO reported, citing El Paso County District Attorney Dan May. Bailey, 19, was shot three times in the back and once in the arm.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 43/79   Jewish Groups Blast Fox News for Joe diGenova’s Anti-Semitic Soros Conspiracy Theory
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Fox has come under fire from Jewish organizations following a Wednesday night segment on Fox Business Network’s Lou Dobbs Tonight in which Trump-boosting lawyer Joe diGenova seemingly trafficked in anti-Semitic tropes by accusing Jewish financier George Soros of controlling “very large parts” of the U.S. Department of State.Speaking with host Lou Dobbs—who has a history of peddling Soros-based conspiracies—diGenova dismissed the impeachment testimony of senior diplomat George Kent by baselessly claiming he is part of an insidious Soros plot to take over Ukraine with the help of State and the FBI.“Well, there’s no doubt that George Soros controls a very large part of the career foreign service of the United States State Department,” exclaimed diGenova, who is currently entangled in the Ukraine scandal. “He also controls the activities of FBI agents overseas who work for [non-governmental organizations]. That was very evident in Ukraine. And Kent was part of that. He was a very big protector of Soros.”Soros

    Fox has come under fire from Jewish organizations following a Wednesday night segment on Fox Business Network’s Lou Dobbs Tonight in which Trump-boosting lawyer Joe diGenova seemingly trafficked in anti-Semitic tropes by accusing Jewish financier George Soros of controlling “very large parts” of the U.S. Department of State.Speaking with host Lou Dobbs—who has a history of peddling Soros-based conspiracies—diGenova dismissed the impeachment testimony of senior diplomat George Kent by baselessly claiming he is part of an insidious Soros plot to take over Ukraine with the help of State and the FBI.“Well, there’s no doubt that George Soros controls a very large part of the career foreign service of the United States State Department,” exclaimed diGenova, who is currently entangled in the Ukraine scandal. “He also controls the activities of FBI agents overseas who work for [non-governmental organizations]. That was very evident in Ukraine. And Kent was part of that. He was a very big protector of Soros.”Soros "corrupted FBI officials, he corrupted foreign service officers,” the frequent Fox guest concluded. “And the bottom line is this, George Soros wants to run Ukraine and he’s doing everything he can to use every lever of the United States government to make that happen, for business interests, not for good government business.”The far-right lawyer’s remarks are extremely similar to comments made by Judicial Watch’s Chris Farrell last year during a Dobbs interview—comments that got Farrell banned from Fox programming. At the time, Farrell invoked the anti-Semitic “Zionist occupied government” conspiracy theory by claiming migrant caravans from Central America were being funded by the “Soros-occupied State Department.”Jonathan Greenblatt, the CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, took to Twitter on Thursday to call on Fox to hold to the same standards they used with Farrell.“Invoking Soros as controlling the State Dept, FBI, and Ukraine is trafficking in some of the worst anti-Semitic tropes,” he wrote. “@FoxNews won’t have Chris Farrell on for making similar remarks, and they should hold the same standard for @JoeDiGenova.”Greenblatt also pointed to an ADL explainer on why many of the Soros conspiracy theories spread by the right are anti-Semitic dog whistles.In an additional statement to the Daily Beast, Greenblatt said, “If Mr. DiGenova insists on spreading anti-Semitic conspiracy theories, there is absolutely no reason for Fox News to give him an open mic to do so. Mainstream news networks should never give a platform to those who spread hate.”A spokesperson for J Street, a liberal Jewish advocacy group, told The Daily Beast that there was “no excuse” in providing diGenova a platform to push his “hateful” conspiracies."The fact that Fox News guests have repeatedly promulgated anti-Semitic conspiracy theories about George Soros and other wealthy Jewish people is dangerous and outrageous,” spokesman Logan Bayroff said in an email. “It's part of a trend of rising xenophobia in which far-right activists and their political allies demonize immigrants, Jews, Muslims and other vulnerable minority communities—a trend that has in turn fueled a surge of white supremacist violence. There can be no excuse for providing a regular platform for these hateful lies."“George Soros is to the 21st Century what the Rothschilds were to the 20th Century: Jewish individuals who antisemitic conspiracy theorists seize upon and invoke as symbols of Jewish power,” Emily Mayer, co-founder of progressive American Jewish group IfNotNow, told The Daily Beast. “DiGenova’s comments aren’t new. We’ve heard them before on Fox News—not just from guests, but from hosts like Lou Dobbs himself and Laura Ingraham. It comes from sitting public officials, leaders like Kevin McCarthy, Chuck Grassley, and Donald Trump. And because of those who repeat vile tropes, antisemitic conspiracy theories about George Soros have made their way from the corners of far-right chatrooms into the political mainstream. We only have to look at Pittsburgh to see that the consequences are deadly.”Halie Soifer, executive director of the Jewish Democratic Council of America, added in a statement, “There is a deeply troubling pattern of Trump administration officials and allies trafficking in anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and tropes, which has directly contributed to the emboldening of white nationalism and rise of anti-Semitism in America under Trump. Our organization is tracking this dangerous rise, and has no doubt that the conspiracy theories directed at Jews promulgated by Trump and his associates have made Jews in America less safe. We call on Fox News to condemn these remarks immediately.”Soros’ philanthropic organization, Open Society Foundations, also sent an email to Fox News CEO Suzanne Scott about diGenova’s on-air remarks. Noting that it’s “bad enough” that Dobbs and other commentators “regularly engage in the most grotesque ant-Semitic slurs against Mr. Soros,” Open Society president Patrick Gaspard said diGenova’s evidence-free claim went “beyond rhetorical ugliness.”“This is McCarthyite,” Gaspard continued while noting Farrell had been banned for similar remarks. “This situation demands no less. I request an on-air retraction, and request that you bar Mr. diGenova as a guest on your network. I believe you owe an apology to the State Department and the FBI as well.”DiGenova, meanwhile, defended his on-air remarks by emailing The Daily Beast three columns by conservative columnist John Solomon, a Fox News contributor whose “reporting” is at the heart of Trumpworld’s Ukraine conspiracies. Solomon is a frequent guest on Fox’s pro-Trump opinion shows.Besides regularly sharing Fox airtime with Solomon, diGenova also serves as the columnist’s personal lawyer and has previously reviewed his articles at The Hill before they were published.Fox News did not immediately respond to a request for comment on whether the network will continue to book diGenova for on-air gigs.Fox Regular Claims George Soros ‘Controls a Very Large Part’ of the State DepartmentRead more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 44/79   U.S. Justice Kavanaugh upbeat in first major public speech
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A gathering of conservative lawyers gave U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh a rapturous reception on Thursday for an upbeat speech in his first major public appearance since sexual misconduct accusations almost derailed his appointment.  Appointed last year to the high court by Republican President Donald Trump, Kavanaugh addressed the annual meeting of the conservative Federalist Society at Washington's Union Station.  Kavanaugh thanked friends who stood by him during the contentious confirmation process and appeared emotional when mentioning his wife and daughters.

    A gathering of conservative lawyers gave U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh a rapturous reception on Thursday for an upbeat speech in his first major public appearance since sexual misconduct accusations almost derailed his appointment. Appointed last year to the high court by Republican President Donald Trump, Kavanaugh addressed the annual meeting of the conservative Federalist Society at Washington's Union Station. Kavanaugh thanked friends who stood by him during the contentious confirmation process and appeared emotional when mentioning his wife and daughters.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 45/79   Sanders, AOC to Introduce Over $100 Billion Plan to Make Public Housing Environmentally Friendly
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D., N.Y.) and Senator Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) plan to introduce legislation on Thursday that makes public housing more energy efficient, at a cost of over $100 billion.The plan, dubbed the Green New Deal for Public Housing Act, will call for renovation of public housing units to install community gardens and organic grocery stores along with on-site childcare services, according to the Washington Post. Data for Progress, a progressive think tank, has estimated the cost of the program at between $119-$172 billion over the next decade.

    Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D., N.Y.) and Senator Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) plan to introduce legislation on Thursday that makes public housing more energy efficient, at a cost of over $100 billion.The plan, dubbed the Green New Deal for Public Housing Act, will call for renovation of public housing units to install community gardens and organic grocery stores along with on-site childcare services, according to the Washington Post. Data for Progress, a progressive think tank, has estimated the cost of the program at between $119-$172 billion over the next decade."Importantly, the working people who have been most impacted by decades of disinvestment in public housing will be empowered to lead this effort and share in the economic prosperity that it generates for our country," Sanders said in a statement. Ocasio-Cortez said the legislation will "train and mobilize the workforce to decarbonize the public housing stock."In February of this year, Ocasio-Cortez released with Senator Ed Markey (D., Mass.) the "Green New Deal" plan to reduce carbon emissions across the U.S. to net zero within ten years and to eliminate completely the fossil fuel industry within the same time frame. The plan was widely pilloried by conservatives as well as many Democrats for being impractical."The green dream or whatever they call it," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said at the time, "nobody knows what it is, but they’re for it, right?""It is difficult to take this unrealistic manifesto seriously, but the economic and social devastation it would cause if it moves forward is serious and real," said Terry O’Sullivan, the president of the Laborers’ International Union of North America, when the plan was released.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 46/79   An Air India flight was delayed nearly 12 hours after a stowaway rat was spotted in the cabin
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS



    "The rat was located and trapped. Then the aircraft was fumigated," a representative from Air India said, according to Indian local media.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 47/79   The U.S. Navy canceled a routine Black Sea operation after Trump complained that it was hostile to Russia
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Christopher Anderson, an aide to Kurt Volker, former special envoy to Ukraine, testified that the White House canceled a Navy freedom-of-navigation operation in the Black Sea after President Trump complained to then-national security adviser John Bolton about a CNN report that framed the operation as a counter to Russia, Politico reported.

    Christopher Anderson, an aide to Kurt Volker, former special envoy to Ukraine, testified that the White House canceled a Navy freedom-of-navigation operation in the Black Sea after President Trump complained to then-national security adviser John Bolton about a CNN report that framed the operation as a counter to Russia, Politico reported.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 48/79   Cows swept off island during Hurricane Dorian found after swimming for miles
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Cows missing for two months were located on North Carolina’s Outer Banks after ‘mini tsunami’ carried wildlife awayCows are recognized as adept swimmers comfortable with covering a few hundred yards – but swimming miles of open water in a hurricane is outside their general range.  Photograph: Dawn Damico/AlamyThree cows swept off an island during the raging storm of Hurricane Dorian have been located on North Carolina’s Outer Banks after apparently swimming four miles during the storm.The extraordinary swimming bovines were grazing on their home of Cedar Island when the giant storm hit on 6 September, generating an 8ft “mini tsunami” that swept away wildlife, including 28 wild horses and about 17 cows from the island’s herd.They were presumed dead, but Cape Lookout National Seashore staff spotted one of the cows on another barrier island a month after the storm. That sighting was followed by two more, apparently grazing peaceably. A picture of the rangy-looking trio is now on Facebook.Cows are recognized as adept swimmers comfortable with covering a few hundred yards. But swimming miles of open water in a hurricane is outside their general range of expertise.Cape Lookout Park spokesman BG Horvat said the animals were lucky not to have been swept out into the Atlantic.“I’ll say it’s about four miles across Core Sound,” Horvat told McClatchy news service. “Remember, the cows and all the horses were swept away with the water surging back. Who knows exactly, but the cows certainly have a gripping story to share.”Locals are now working on a plan to recover the animals – presumably without making them swim.

    Cows missing for two months were located on North Carolina’s Outer Banks after ‘mini tsunami’ carried wildlife awayCows are recognized as adept swimmers comfortable with covering a few hundred yards – but swimming miles of open water in a hurricane is outside their general range. Photograph: Dawn Damico/AlamyThree cows swept off an island during the raging storm of Hurricane Dorian have been located on North Carolina’s Outer Banks after apparently swimming four miles during the storm.The extraordinary swimming bovines were grazing on their home of Cedar Island when the giant storm hit on 6 September, generating an 8ft “mini tsunami” that swept away wildlife, including 28 wild horses and about 17 cows from the island’s herd.They were presumed dead, but Cape Lookout National Seashore staff spotted one of the cows on another barrier island a month after the storm. That sighting was followed by two more, apparently grazing peaceably. A picture of the rangy-looking trio is now on Facebook.Cows are recognized as adept swimmers comfortable with covering a few hundred yards. But swimming miles of open water in a hurricane is outside their general range of expertise.Cape Lookout Park spokesman BG Horvat said the animals were lucky not to have been swept out into the Atlantic.“I’ll say it’s about four miles across Core Sound,” Horvat told McClatchy news service. “Remember, the cows and all the horses were swept away with the water surging back. Who knows exactly, but the cows certainly have a gripping story to share.”Locals are now working on a plan to recover the animals – presumably without making them swim.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 49/79   Sri Lanka author attacked ahead of key polls
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Armed men stabbed and injured a writer in Sri Lanka on Thursday, a week after he published a book criticising the main opposition candidate at Saturday's presidential polls, police said.  The attackers stormed the home of Lasantha Wijeratne, who released his book 'Wasteful Development and Corruption' last week and gave a copy to ruling party candidate Sajith Premadasa.  'Four men broke into the house and stabbed him in the arm after holding a pistol to his wife's head,' Wijeratne's lawyer Tharaka Nanayakkara told AFP by telephone.

    Armed men stabbed and injured a writer in Sri Lanka on Thursday, a week after he published a book criticising the main opposition candidate at Saturday's presidential polls, police said. The attackers stormed the home of Lasantha Wijeratne, who released his book 'Wasteful Development and Corruption' last week and gave a copy to ruling party candidate Sajith Premadasa. 'Four men broke into the house and stabbed him in the arm after holding a pistol to his wife's head,' Wijeratne's lawyer Tharaka Nanayakkara told AFP by telephone.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 50/79   More than 50% of insects have disappeared since 1970, an ecologist warns — even more evidence of an 'insect apocalypse'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A new report reveals that 50% or more of insects have disappeared since 1970 due to habitat loss and pesticide use.

    A new report reveals that 50% or more of insects have disappeared since 1970 due to habitat loss and pesticide use.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 51/79   Scientists put out the call for 10,000 canines to join the Dog Aging Project
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists are looking for 10,000 good dogs to take part in a 10-year effort aimed at tracking their health and identifying factors that can lengthen their lifespan. The pets that are selected for the Dog Aging Project could come in for some scientific pampering, including genome sequencing and health assessments. But that doesn't mean the project's organizers at the University of Washington, Texas A&M University and other research institutions are totally going to the dogs. The larger purpose of the campaign — and the reason why it's getting $15 million in direct funding from the National Institute on Aging at… Read More

    Scientists are looking for 10,000 good dogs to take part in a 10-year effort aimed at tracking their health and identifying factors that can lengthen their lifespan. The pets that are selected for the Dog Aging Project could come in for some scientific pampering, including genome sequencing and health assessments. But that doesn't mean the project's organizers at the University of Washington, Texas A&M University and other research institutions are totally going to the dogs. The larger purpose of the campaign — and the reason why it's getting $15 million in direct funding from the National Institute on Aging at… Read More


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 52/79   A troubling new study shows that legalizing marijuana is linked with an increase in problematic pot use among teens
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states, and some Democratic presidential candidates have said the drug should become legal nationwide.

    Recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states, and some Democratic presidential candidates have said the drug should become legal nationwide.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 53/79   SpaceX executes ground-based test firing for Crew Dragon’s launch escape system
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    SpaceX went the distance today with a static-fire test of its Crew Dragon space taxi's launch escape system — the same type of test that ended in a costly explosion when it was conducted in April. A photo released after the firing shows the Crew Dragon's SuperDraco thrusters blazing away on the test stand at SpaceX's Florida facility. The full-duration firing brings the company one step closer to flying NASA astronauts to the International Space Station next year.

    SpaceX went the distance today with a static-fire test of its Crew Dragon space taxi's launch escape system — the same type of test that ended in a costly explosion when it was conducted in April. A photo released after the firing shows the Crew Dragon's SuperDraco thrusters blazing away on the test stand at SpaceX's Florida facility. The full-duration firing brings the company one step closer to flying NASA astronauts to the International Space Station next year. "SpaceX and NASA teams are now reviewing test data and working toward an in-flight demonstration of Crew Dragon's launch escape system," SpaceX… Read More


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 54/79   After visiting asteroid, Japan’s Hayabusa 2 probe heads back to Earth with samples
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Japan's Hayabusa 2 spacecraft and its science team bid a bittersweet farewell to the asteroid Ryugu, 180 million miles from Earth, and began the months-long return trip to Earth with a precious set of samples.

    Japan's Hayabusa 2 spacecraft and its science team bid a bittersweet farewell to the asteroid Ryugu, 180 million miles from Earth, and began the months-long return trip to Earth with a precious set of samples. "This is an emotional moment!" the team tweeted on Tuesday. “It's sad to say goodbye to Ryugu,” project manager Yuichi Tsuda said at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's command center. “Literally it has been at the center of our lives over the past one and a half years.” The farewell isn't finished quite yet, however. Over the next few days, Hayabusa 2's camera will capture… Read More


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 55/79   ‘Ultima Thule’ no more: New Horizons’ space snowman is named Arrokoth
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The snowman-shaped object that NASA's New Horizons probe flew past nearly a year ago on the solar system's icy fringe now has a Native American name: Arrokoth, a word that means

    The snowman-shaped object that NASA's New Horizons probe flew past nearly a year ago on the solar system's icy fringe now has a Native American name: Arrokoth, a word that means "sky" in the Powhatan/Algonquian language. Arrokoth replaces earlier labels for the Kuiper Belt object, including the numerical designation 2014 MU69 and the nickname Ultima Thule, which turned out to be rather controversial. Members of the New Horizons science team announced today that their proposed name has won approval by the International Astronomical Union and its Minor Planet Center. Before making the proposal, the scientists won the consent of elders… Read More


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 56/79   Hurricanes on the scale of Katrina and Harvey are now 3 times more likely than a century ago: 'We cannot hope to combat storms'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A new study reveals that extremely damaging hurricanes are becoming more frequent relative to moderate storms, likely due to climate change.

    A new study reveals that extremely damaging hurricanes are becoming more frequent relative to moderate storms, likely due to climate change.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 57/79   Mercury is traveling across the sun for the last time until 2032. Here's how to watch the rare transit.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Mercury transit won't appear in space again until 2032. But if you want to watch the event, don't look at the sun without protection.

    The Mercury transit won't appear in space again until 2032. But if you want to watch the event, don't look at the sun without protection.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 58/79   Officials believe vitamin E oil is playing a pivotal role in the outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses, after 39 deaths
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Investigators said vitamin E acetate, an ingredient found in canola, soy, and corn oil, appears to be playing a pivotal role in the spate of vaping-related lung illnesses during a call with reporters on Friday.

    Investigators said vitamin E acetate, an ingredient found in canola, soy, and corn oil, appears to be playing a pivotal role in the spate of vaping-related lung illnesses during a call with reporters on Friday.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 59/79   When the Andromeda galaxy crashes into the Milky Way, this is what it could look like from Earth
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Milky Way is on track to collide with the Andromeda galaxy in about 4 billion years. NASA images reveal what the night sky might look like.

    The Milky Way is on track to collide with the Andromeda galaxy in about 4 billion years. NASA images reveal what the night sky might look like.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 60/79   Ukraine’s Anti-Russia Azov Battalion: ‘Minutemen’ or Neo-Nazi Terrorists?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    KYIV—When Deputy Secretary of State George Kent spoke at the U.S. House of Representatives impeachment hearings this week, he painted a powerful picture of Ukrainian bravery in the face of Russian aggression. In 2014, when “Russia invaded Ukraine” and occupied 7 percent of its territory, Ukraine’s state institutions were “on the verge of collapse,” he said. But “Ukrainian civil society answered the challenge. They formed volunteer battalions of citizens, including technology professionals and medics. They crowd-sourced funding for their own weapons, body armor, and supplies. They were the 21st century Ukrainian equivalent of our own Minutemen in 1776, buying time for the regular army to reconstitute.”But Kent most likely did not have in mind the most famous—and infamous—of those volunteer units, the Azov Battalion, which 40 members of Congress have asked the State Department to designate as a Foreign Terrorist Organization. Some of its members are neo-Nazis, white supremacists and avowed anti-Semites.Are the Azov fighters, in fact, “Minutemen” or monsters, freedom fighters or terrorists? Or in some cases both? The Frightening Far-Right Militia That’s Marching in Ukraine’s Streets, Promising to Bring ‘Order’Angry demonstrations here in Kyiv about those congressional efforts to get Azov declared an “FTO” suggest just how complicated and treacherous the political and military landscape has become in this nation fighting for survival. It is another factor—along with the extortionate, allegedly impeachable games played by the Trump administration—weakening the position of President Volodymyr Zelnsky as he struggles to achieve an equitable peace with Putin.The congressional letter addressed to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and pushed by freshman Democratic Rep. Max Rose from Staten Island, portrays Azov as part of an ultra-right-wing “global terrorist network” analogous to al-Qaeda or the so-called Islamic State, but one bent on attacking Muslims, Jews, and people of color. The letter notes that the man who carried out the mosque massacres in New Zealand last March, killing at least 50 worshippers, claimed he trained with the Azov. His live-streamed slaughter then inspired murderers in the United States who targeted a synagogue in Poway, California, and Hispanic shoppers in El Paso, Texas.The October 16 letter quoted a tweet a week before by Rita Katz, director of SITE Intelligence and a Daily Beast contributor, after the synagogue attack in Halle, Germany, on October 9. Katz noted “the similarity between this video” in Halle and the New Zealand attacker’s, concluding it was “another installment from a global terrorist network, linked together via online safe havens much like ISIS.” Symbolically, at least, Azov has become a rallying point for the neo-Nazi international community.The State Department response to the letter was non-committal, denying that its failure to designate various foreign groups as terrorist organizations had anything to do with “ideology or motives.”* * *In many ways Oleksandr Konibor, a self-professed admirer of far right movements in Europe, is typical of the Ukrainians who heeded the call to fight for their country by joining the Azov battalion in 2014. 

    KYIV—When Deputy Secretary of State George Kent spoke at the U.S. House of Representatives impeachment hearings this week, he painted a powerful picture of Ukrainian bravery in the face of Russian aggression. In 2014, when “Russia invaded Ukraine” and occupied 7 percent of its territory, Ukraine’s state institutions were “on the verge of collapse,” he said. But “Ukrainian civil society answered the challenge. They formed volunteer battalions of citizens, including technology professionals and medics. They crowd-sourced funding for their own weapons, body armor, and supplies. They were the 21st century Ukrainian equivalent of our own Minutemen in 1776, buying time for the regular army to reconstitute.”But Kent most likely did not have in mind the most famous—and infamous—of those volunteer units, the Azov Battalion, which 40 members of Congress have asked the State Department to designate as a Foreign Terrorist Organization. Some of its members are neo-Nazis, white supremacists and avowed anti-Semites.Are the Azov fighters, in fact, “Minutemen” or monsters, freedom fighters or terrorists? Or in some cases both? The Frightening Far-Right Militia That’s Marching in Ukraine’s Streets, Promising to Bring ‘Order’Angry demonstrations here in Kyiv about those congressional efforts to get Azov declared an “FTO” suggest just how complicated and treacherous the political and military landscape has become in this nation fighting for survival. It is another factor—along with the extortionate, allegedly impeachable games played by the Trump administration—weakening the position of President Volodymyr Zelnsky as he struggles to achieve an equitable peace with Putin.The congressional letter addressed to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and pushed by freshman Democratic Rep. Max Rose from Staten Island, portrays Azov as part of an ultra-right-wing “global terrorist network” analogous to al-Qaeda or the so-called Islamic State, but one bent on attacking Muslims, Jews, and people of color. The letter notes that the man who carried out the mosque massacres in New Zealand last March, killing at least 50 worshippers, claimed he trained with the Azov. His live-streamed slaughter then inspired murderers in the United States who targeted a synagogue in Poway, California, and Hispanic shoppers in El Paso, Texas.The October 16 letter quoted a tweet a week before by Rita Katz, director of SITE Intelligence and a Daily Beast contributor, after the synagogue attack in Halle, Germany, on October 9. Katz noted “the similarity between this video” in Halle and the New Zealand attacker’s, concluding it was “another installment from a global terrorist network, linked together via online safe havens much like ISIS.” Symbolically, at least, Azov has become a rallying point for the neo-Nazi international community.The State Department response to the letter was non-committal, denying that its failure to designate various foreign groups as terrorist organizations had anything to do with “ideology or motives.”* * *In many ways Oleksandr Konibor, a self-professed admirer of far right movements in Europe, is typical of the Ukrainians who heeded the call to fight for their country by joining the Azov battalion in 2014. "It was a tragic time for our country and in some ways a wonderful time for us," said Konibor, a 34-year-old teacher. To be sure, some members of Azov wore swastikas their uniforms and a patch associated with the unit looks like a variation on Nazi symbols. Other members were fringe Pagan worshipers, former convicts, unemployed men or merely adventure seekers. In those early “Minuteman” days, nobody was very picky about who picked up a gun to fight the Russians. The Azov fought shoulder-to-shoulder with a unit of Chechen Islamist fighters, who had their own reasons to come to the front. What united them, in fact, was not so much far right ideology as a willingness to be in the trenches. Konibor said he joined not for reasons of ideology but to defend his country and because he liked spending time with men from the soccer clubs he belonged to. In Ukraine, in the years since the fighting began, the Azov has come to be viewed as a unit of misfits whose flaws, however obvious, were cleansed by the crucible of combat.After the congressional letter was reported here last month, Azov soldiers staged protests in Kyiv. Veterans with stern faces, their wives and girlfriends holding roses in their hands, gathered in front of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. They held signs saying, “Ukraine’s defenders are not terrorists.” Ukrainian officials and Members of Parliament pushed back against the initiative on Capitol Hill. They concede Azov includes marginal figures but it is now also formally part of Ukraine's armed forces, having been incorporated into the National Guard, and should not be identified as a terrorist group. The letter to Pompeo was pretty unequivocal, however, and notes that Congress specifically prohibited the Azov from receiving arms, training or other assistance from the United States in 2018.“I am sure that the congressmen who wrote the appeal had not seen a single Azov soldier,” Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs Anton Geraschenko told The Daily Beast, adding that some members of Congress have been invited to Ukraine. Geraschnko insisted that there was “no proven evidence” of any connection between Azov and the Christchurch shooter, even though the shooter had painted an Azov insignia on one of his rifles.The unit’s supporters here argue that accepting the letter's characterization is bending to Russian propaganda, which casts all Ukrainian soldiers as neo-Fascists. And Russian media rejoiced at the congressional letter: the American establishment is getting tired of Ukraine, reports said. The battalion’s founder, Adriy Biletskiy has a two-decade history in far-right movements and has spent time in prison for murder—on trumped-up charges, he says. In the past, he played a leading role in the far-right Patriot of Ukraine and Social National Assembly. When the war began in 2014, as George Kent noted, Ukraine’s army was in miserable condition and authorities did not stop Azov from using banners and chevrons featuring Nazi symbols, including the wolfsangel insignia associated with the Nazi SS. This is a tragic reminder of Ukraine's past. Some 1.5 million Jews were killed here during World War II. “Ukraine is where the Holocaust began,” Carl Gershman, president of the National Endowment for Democracy wrote in a Washington Post opinion piece a week after President Zelensky’s inauguration. “The new government in Ukraine should also play a more expansive role in acknowledging the Holocaust as part of its national history.”For now, however, when Azov members publicly admire Hitler, authorities are reluctant to condemn them.* * *Last year Zaborona media group reported on the lives of Azov soldiers in eastern Ukraine. “One day we saw a flag of Nazi Germany in the window at the Azov military base in the city of Mariupol,” Zaborona founder, Yekateryna Sergatskova, told The Daily Beast. “Before the war, many of the Azov guys sympathized with Russia’s neo-Nazi groups; I still wonder why Azov is fascinated with Hitler, it could be that the worshipping of Nazi Germany’s ideology is their revolt against Stalinism, against the Communist regime.” Last year battalion founder Biletskiy personally took an oath from hundreds of Azov veterans and far-right activists joining his National Corps militia—a far-right political movement promising “to establish order in Ukraine.”Some Azov veterans see their mission in the most radical way. According to an investigative report by Bellingcat, Ukrainian supremacists translated the hate-filled manifesto by the Christchurch shooter into Ukrainian and sold the pamphlets for $4 a piece at Azov’s literature club.Is America Training Neonazis in Ukraine?“Several American and European citizens have served in Azov, and even more Russian citizens joined the battalion in 2014-2015,” Vyacheslav Likhachev, Ukraine’s leading expert on far-right movements told The Daily Beast. “Yes, numerous Azov soldiers share neo-Nazi ideology but the U.S. congressmen cannot blacklist the entire regiment of the interior forces, it would be the same as to accuse the state of Ukraine of terrorism.” To make their point, Azov veterans and their supporters started “A Veteran is Not a Terrorist” campaign, criticizing Max Rose for initiating the letter to Pompeo. Yelena, a slim, rather gloomy looking waitress waiting for her boyfriend, an Azov soldier, to come home from the war told The Daily Beast, “I am sure Rep. Rose is sitting in his office, he has not smelled any gunpowder.” (In fact, Rose is a decorated combat veteran of the U.S. Army who served as a platoon leader and was wounded in Afghanistan.) “Right at this very moment my husband and other Azov guys are defending Ukraine from Russian aggression," said Yelena. "They are heroes and not terrorists like ISIS.”Authorities in Kyiv say they will stand by veterans, and hope to talk the U.S. government out of any designation of Azov as a terrorist organization. Those opposed to this labeling think of soldiers as heroes, no matter how far right their ideology. One volunteer, Natalia Voronokova and her team have been providing medicine, food and ammunition for Azov soldiers since the early days of the war. “I have seen Azov on the battlefield," she said. They endured hardships and losses. "And as for their sub-culture, that is their choice.”Anna Nemtsova reported from Kyiv. Christopher Dickey reported from Paris.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 61/79   Living in the Year of Unforeseen Consequences
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Europe just witnessed two low-key political developments that may have far-reaching consequences.The European Union’s executive threatened legal action against the U.K. after Boris Johnson’s government refused to nominate an EU commission member. Despite Brexit, the U.K. is obliged to put up a candidate, and its failure to do so seemed to catch the bloc off guard. The standoff might delay the new EU commission from taking office Dec. 1 and risks further stoking tensions.In Luxembourg, the European Investment Bank — the EU’s lending arm — opted to stop funding fossil-fuel projects and favor more support for clean energy. EIB director Werner Hoyer called the decision a “quantum leap” in ambition to tackle the No. 1 issue on “the political agenda of our time.”Both developments, while not entirely out of left field, underscore how unforeseen events can force governments’ hands. Just look at the violent protests in Hong Kong or the political unrest unleashed from Iraq and Lebanon to Bolivia and Chile. Climate protests have erupted in cities across the globe this year.Oscar Wilde wrote that to expect the unexpected is a sign of a thoroughly modern intellect. More than a century later, it’s advice that politicians would do well to heed.Global HeadlinesSpotlight on | Rudy Giuliani’s role in back-channel efforts to pressure Ukraine will come under closer scrutiny today as the House impeachment investigation hears public testimony from Marie Yovanovitch, who was abruptly ousted as U.S. ambassador to Kyiv in May following what she has described as a smear campaign Giuliani directed.Giuliani, Trump’s personal lawyer, also is being investigated by federal prosecutors for possible campaign finance violations and failure to register as a foreign agent, Chris Strohm and Jordan Fabian report.White-collar protests | Hong Kong professionals joined lunchtime protests in the financial district for the fifth straight day, capping a week of unprecedented violence that began with a demonstrator being shot and seriously injured on Monday and then saw the death of a government employee who police say was hit by a brick. Chinese President Xi Jinping condemned the unrest, which once again threatens to drag into the weekend, as university and school closures left the city practically paralyzed. Click here for more on the economic toll.The U.S. Senate is preparing for quick passage of legislation to show support for the protesters by placing Hong Kong’s special trading status with the U.S. under annual review.Sanctions master | North Korea is poking holes through a global web of sanctions and generating enough cash to keep its nuclear weapons program moving along as a year-end deadline Kim Jong Un set to reach a deal with the U.S. approaches — with little progress in sight. Kim has yet to make any concessions on his nation’s nuclear program, making it difficult for America’s “maximum pressure” campaign to deliver on what the Trump administration has promised.Crunching the numbers | The economic experts that 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is careful to cite on the costs of her multi-trillion-dollar policy proposals actually disagree among themselves about how or whether those plans will work. And it highlights Warren’s challenge in convincing voters that she can generate enough revenue to provide free health care, free public college, universal childcare, forgive a portion of student loans and mitigate climate change.The Democratic National Committee has announced the 10 candidates who will participate in the fifth Democratic primary debate in Atlanta on Wednesday.China’s influence | Sri Lankans face a stark choice as they elect a new president Saturday. Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s powerful family has a history of authoritarian rule and is likely to take the country closer to Beijing. His main rival — Sajith Premadasa, from the current ruling alliance — promises more freedoms but faces a credibility test over security lapses that led to deadly bombings on Easter.What to WatchLebanon’s major political parties agreed to name businessman and ex-finance minister Mohammad Safadi as the new premier, local media reported, but anti-government demonstrators immediately rejected the choice. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is asking companies that mine and buy copper and cobalt from the Democratic Republic of Congo to do more to fight corruption and child labor. Bolivian interim President Jeanine Anez is struggling to consolidate control as lawmakers and former ministers loyal to ousted socialist leader Evo Morales try to reclaim the levers of power.Pop quiz, readers (no cheating!). Britain is under increasing pressure to return its last African colony. What is it? Send us your answers and tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte’s unusual request for his ministers to put aside their squabbles and find a way to rescue a bankrupt steel mill in the southern city of Taranto has laid bare the intense pressure on his fragile coalition. As Ross Larsen and Alessandro Speciale explain, the premier is scrambling for a solution to an industrial crisis — precipitated in part by his own allies — that’s dominated front pages for weeks and provided fodder for the opposition. \--With assistance from Muneeza Naqvi and Iain Marlow.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Kathleen Hunter at khunter9@bloomberg.net, Karl MaierFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Europe just witnessed two low-key political developments that may have far-reaching consequences.The European Union’s executive threatened legal action against the U.K. after Boris Johnson’s government refused to nominate an EU commission member. Despite Brexit, the U.K. is obliged to put up a candidate, and its failure to do so seemed to catch the bloc off guard. The standoff might delay the new EU commission from taking office Dec. 1 and risks further stoking tensions.In Luxembourg, the European Investment Bank — the EU’s lending arm — opted to stop funding fossil-fuel projects and favor more support for clean energy. EIB director Werner Hoyer called the decision a “quantum leap” in ambition to tackle the No. 1 issue on “the political agenda of our time.”Both developments, while not entirely out of left field, underscore how unforeseen events can force governments’ hands. Just look at the violent protests in Hong Kong or the political unrest unleashed from Iraq and Lebanon to Bolivia and Chile. Climate protests have erupted in cities across the globe this year.Oscar Wilde wrote that to expect the unexpected is a sign of a thoroughly modern intellect. More than a century later, it’s advice that politicians would do well to heed.Global HeadlinesSpotlight on | Rudy Giuliani’s role in back-channel efforts to pressure Ukraine will come under closer scrutiny today as the House impeachment investigation hears public testimony from Marie Yovanovitch, who was abruptly ousted as U.S. ambassador to Kyiv in May following what she has described as a smear campaign Giuliani directed.Giuliani, Trump’s personal lawyer, also is being investigated by federal prosecutors for possible campaign finance violations and failure to register as a foreign agent, Chris Strohm and Jordan Fabian report.White-collar protests | Hong Kong professionals joined lunchtime protests in the financial district for the fifth straight day, capping a week of unprecedented violence that began with a demonstrator being shot and seriously injured on Monday and then saw the death of a government employee who police say was hit by a brick. Chinese President Xi Jinping condemned the unrest, which once again threatens to drag into the weekend, as university and school closures left the city practically paralyzed. Click here for more on the economic toll.The U.S. Senate is preparing for quick passage of legislation to show support for the protesters by placing Hong Kong’s special trading status with the U.S. under annual review.Sanctions master | North Korea is poking holes through a global web of sanctions and generating enough cash to keep its nuclear weapons program moving along as a year-end deadline Kim Jong Un set to reach a deal with the U.S. approaches — with little progress in sight. Kim has yet to make any concessions on his nation’s nuclear program, making it difficult for America’s “maximum pressure” campaign to deliver on what the Trump administration has promised.Crunching the numbers | The economic experts that 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is careful to cite on the costs of her multi-trillion-dollar policy proposals actually disagree among themselves about how or whether those plans will work. And it highlights Warren’s challenge in convincing voters that she can generate enough revenue to provide free health care, free public college, universal childcare, forgive a portion of student loans and mitigate climate change.The Democratic National Committee has announced the 10 candidates who will participate in the fifth Democratic primary debate in Atlanta on Wednesday.China’s influence | Sri Lankans face a stark choice as they elect a new president Saturday. Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s powerful family has a history of authoritarian rule and is likely to take the country closer to Beijing. His main rival — Sajith Premadasa, from the current ruling alliance — promises more freedoms but faces a credibility test over security lapses that led to deadly bombings on Easter.What to WatchLebanon’s major political parties agreed to name businessman and ex-finance minister Mohammad Safadi as the new premier, local media reported, but anti-government demonstrators immediately rejected the choice. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is asking companies that mine and buy copper and cobalt from the Democratic Republic of Congo to do more to fight corruption and child labor. Bolivian interim President Jeanine Anez is struggling to consolidate control as lawmakers and former ministers loyal to ousted socialist leader Evo Morales try to reclaim the levers of power.Pop quiz, readers (no cheating!). Britain is under increasing pressure to return its last African colony. What is it? Send us your answers and tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte’s unusual request for his ministers to put aside their squabbles and find a way to rescue a bankrupt steel mill in the southern city of Taranto has laid bare the intense pressure on his fragile coalition. As Ross Larsen and Alessandro Speciale explain, the premier is scrambling for a solution to an industrial crisis — precipitated in part by his own allies — that’s dominated front pages for weeks and provided fodder for the opposition. \--With assistance from Muneeza Naqvi and Iain Marlow.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Kathleen Hunter at khunter9@bloomberg.net, Karl MaierFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 62/79   South African police disperse refugees protesting attacks
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Shield-carrying South African police on Friday removed about 150 refugees who the United Nations refugee agency said forced their way into its compound while protesting recent anti-immigrant attacks.  The police action in the capital, Pretoria, followed one last month in which police arrested and dispersed hundreds of refugees and asylum-seekers, including children, who had camped for weeks outside the U.N. agency's office in Cape Town.  A U.N. statement said they want protection and relocation to a safer country.

    Shield-carrying South African police on Friday removed about 150 refugees who the United Nations refugee agency said forced their way into its compound while protesting recent anti-immigrant attacks. The police action in the capital, Pretoria, followed one last month in which police arrested and dispersed hundreds of refugees and asylum-seekers, including children, who had camped for weeks outside the U.N. agency's office in Cape Town. A U.N. statement said they want protection and relocation to a safer country.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 63/79   Protesters Gather in Central for Fifth Day: Hong Kong Update
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong protesters returned to the central financial district on Friday, the fifth-straight day of rallies in a broader democracy push that’s driven Asia’s premier financial hub toward recession.The Chinese President Xi Jinping said that bringing the violence to an end is Hong Kong’s “most urgent task,” while a scuffle involving the city’s justice secretary and the second protest-related death in a week heightened tensions. The rare comments by Xi during a visit to Brazil on Thursday came as the U.S. Senate moved to expedite passage of legislation that would support Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters.Earlier, a 70-year-old government contract worker who was struck during a brick-hurling fight between protesters and their opponents died of his injuries. Police classified the death as a murder.The protests, which have raged for more than five months, flared anew last week after the death of a student who fell near a police operation to clear a demonstration. A campaign to disrupt traffic has led to the shooting of a protester and citywide school cancellations, while Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s government has denied reports of a plan to institute an unprecedented curfew in a bid to quell unrest.Key developments:City’s No. 2 calls media briefing Protesters return to city’s streetsHong Kong justice minister hurt in LondonXi urges immediate end to violenceGovernment worker dies; 15-year-old still in hospitalSome trains services remain suspendedHere’s the latest (all times local):City’s No. 2 to brief media (5:06 p.m.) Hong Kong’s No. 2 official Matthew Cheung called a briefing for 6 p.m. Friday, as the city seeks to break free from the latest wave of protests. The chief secretary will be joined by Civil Service Secretary Joshua Law, Transport Secretary Frank Chan, Education Secretary Kevin Yeung and Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Secretary Patrick Nip. Protesters gather in Chater Garden (5 p.m.)Demonstrators began gathering again in Chater Garden in the city’s central financial district, after dispersing earlier following the arrival of riot cops. Police said they had arrested 58 people since Thursday. They fired 194 rounds of tear gas, 58 rubber bullets and 14 bean bag rounds.Overwhelming support for inquiry (4:45 p.m.)Some 80% of Hong Kong adults want the government to set up an independent commission of inquiry to examine the use of force by police throughout Hong Kong’s recent unrest, according to a new survey by Hong Kong Public Opinion Program. That’s up from 77% earlier this month.An inquiry is one of the five demands that protesters have been chanting about in marches throughout the city for months, but the government has so far ruled out any further political concessions.Hong Kong expects recession (4:30 p.m.)Hong Kong revised down its estimate for economic growth this year, with the government now forecasting the first annual contraction since the global financial crisis a decade ago. Gross domestic product will contract 1.3% in 2019 from the previous year, the government said Friday as it released final output calculations for the third quarter.The government said ending the city’s violent unrest is key to an economic recovery.Police classify death as murder (1:31 p.m.)Police upgraded their probe into the injury of a 70-year-old government worker to a murder investigation after the man died overnight. The man was struck in the head by an object during a scuffle Wednesday between protesters who had set up road blocks and others who were attempting to clear them.The man appeared to be filming in the direction of a group of black-clad protesters when one of them “deliberately threw” an object at him, Chan Tin-chu, senior superintendent for criminal investigations in New Territories North, told reporters at a briefing Friday. The victim didn’t participate in the argument or the attempt to clear the road blocks, Chan said.Protesters start lunchtime rallies (12:40 p.m.)Groups of protesters begin gathering in the financial district for a lunchtime rally, one of several planned across the city. Many wore masks and carried umbrellas.Protesters also began assembling in the bustling Causeway Bay shopping district and in Tai Koo, on the eastern side of Hong Kong Island.Chinese officials condemn attack (12:15 p.m.)The Chinese government raised strong objections to the U.K. consulate in Hong Kong regarding the attack on the city’s justice secretary in London on Thursday. The Office of the Commissioner of the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Hong Kong also urged the U.K. government and police to punish those responsible for the attack on Teresa Cheng, according to a statement.Hurt 15-year-old still in hospital (8:56 a.m.)A 15-year-old boy who suffered a head injury from what local media said may have been a tear gas canister was still in Tuen Mun Hospital, the Hospital Authority said. The agency said the boy’s family asked that details of his condition -- which was originally listed as critical -- not be disclosed.Six people, ages 17 to 62, had been admitted to various hospitals for treatment for protest-related injuries overnight and this morning as of 7:30 a.m. All are in stable condition. The man shot by police in Sai Wan Ho on Monday is now in stable condition in Eastern Hospital. A man set on fire during an argument with protesters on the same day was still in critical condition at Prince of Wales Hospital.Group blames government for death (7:32 a.m.)A group of anonymous protesters that has occasionally spoken for the leaderless movement expressed “deepest condolences” for the death of a 70-year-old government worker Thursday, but blamed the incident on “police brutality” and government intransigence. “The HKSAR Government must concede to the Five Demands, and return to the table of politics to solve conflicts by political means,” the so-called Citizens’ Press Conference said in a statement Friday.Meanwhile, another protester group at the Chinese University of Hong Kong offered to remove barricades from the Tolo Highway in exchange for a government pledge to follow through with plans for District Council elections on Nov. 24, according to Radio Television Hong Kong. Students had already reopened one lane in each direction, the South China Morning Post said.Some trains still suspended (5:55 a.m.)Service between Fo Tan and Lo Wu and Lok Ma Chau on the East Rail Line are suspended due to vandalism, railway operator the MTR Corp. said Friday. Trains between Hung Hom and Fo Tan on the same line are running every five minutes. Stations at Mong Kok, Tseung Kwan O, Sai Wan Ho, Tuen Mun and Tung Chung also remain shut.Justice secretary ‘attacked’ (3:47 a.m.)Hong Kong Justice Secretary Teresa Cheng condemned what her office said was an attack by a “violent mob” that caused her “serious bodily harm” Thursday while she was on an official visit to London. Cheng fell and hurt her arm after being surrounded by a group of about 30 protesters, the South China Morning Post newspaper reported.“The secretary denounces all forms of violence and radicalism depriving others’ legitimate rights in the pretext of pursuing their political ideals, which would never be in the interest of Hong Kong and any civilized society,” Cheng’s office said in a statement.Agency ‘saddened’ by death (2:21 a.m.)Hong Kong’s Food and Environmental Hygiene Department confirmed that one of its contract workers had died Thursday from a head injury, expressing “profound sadness” over his death. The elderly worker “was suspected to be hit in his head by hard objects hurled by rioters during his lunch break,” the agency said in a statement, adding that it would provide assistance to the victim’s family.The government vowed to “make every effort to investigate the case to bring offenders to justice.”U.S. Senate advances bill (12:41 a.m.)The U.S. Senate is preparing for quick passage of legislation that would support pro-democracy protesters by placing Hong Kong’s special trading status with the U.S. under annual review. The Senate will run the “hotline” on the bill, which is an expedited process to check for last-minute opposition to bringing legislation immediately to a vote, according to Senator Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican.The Senate legislation is different than a version passed earlier by the House of Representatives. That means the two bills would have to be reconciled and passed by both chambers before going to President Donald Trump to be signed into law.Xi seeks end to violence (10:25 p.m. Thursday)Xi, currently on a visit to Brazil, said “continuing radical violent crimes in Hong Kong have seriously trampled on the rule of law and social order, seriously undermined Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability, and seriously challenged the bottom line of the ‘one country, two systems’ principle,” state broadcaster China Central Television reported in a social media post.“Stopping the violence and restoring order is Hong Kong’s most urgent task at present,” Xi said, reiterating support for Lam. “We will continue to firmly support the chief executive to lead the government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region in accordance with the law, firmly support the Hong Kong Police in law enforcement, and firmly support the Hong Kong judiciary in punishing violent criminals.”\--With assistance from Erin Roman, Daniel Flatley, Colin Keatinge and Dandan Li.To contact the reporters on this story: Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.net;Natalie Lung in Hong Kong at flung6@bloomberg.net;Dominic Lau in Hong Kong at dlau92@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong protesters returned to the central financial district on Friday, the fifth-straight day of rallies in a broader democracy push that’s driven Asia’s premier financial hub toward recession.The Chinese President Xi Jinping said that bringing the violence to an end is Hong Kong’s “most urgent task,” while a scuffle involving the city’s justice secretary and the second protest-related death in a week heightened tensions. The rare comments by Xi during a visit to Brazil on Thursday came as the U.S. Senate moved to expedite passage of legislation that would support Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters.Earlier, a 70-year-old government contract worker who was struck during a brick-hurling fight between protesters and their opponents died of his injuries. Police classified the death as a murder.The protests, which have raged for more than five months, flared anew last week after the death of a student who fell near a police operation to clear a demonstration. A campaign to disrupt traffic has led to the shooting of a protester and citywide school cancellations, while Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s government has denied reports of a plan to institute an unprecedented curfew in a bid to quell unrest.Key developments:City’s No. 2 calls media briefing Protesters return to city’s streetsHong Kong justice minister hurt in LondonXi urges immediate end to violenceGovernment worker dies; 15-year-old still in hospitalSome trains services remain suspendedHere’s the latest (all times local):City’s No. 2 to brief media (5:06 p.m.) Hong Kong’s No. 2 official Matthew Cheung called a briefing for 6 p.m. Friday, as the city seeks to break free from the latest wave of protests. The chief secretary will be joined by Civil Service Secretary Joshua Law, Transport Secretary Frank Chan, Education Secretary Kevin Yeung and Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Secretary Patrick Nip. Protesters gather in Chater Garden (5 p.m.)Demonstrators began gathering again in Chater Garden in the city’s central financial district, after dispersing earlier following the arrival of riot cops. Police said they had arrested 58 people since Thursday. They fired 194 rounds of tear gas, 58 rubber bullets and 14 bean bag rounds.Overwhelming support for inquiry (4:45 p.m.)Some 80% of Hong Kong adults want the government to set up an independent commission of inquiry to examine the use of force by police throughout Hong Kong’s recent unrest, according to a new survey by Hong Kong Public Opinion Program. That’s up from 77% earlier this month.An inquiry is one of the five demands that protesters have been chanting about in marches throughout the city for months, but the government has so far ruled out any further political concessions.Hong Kong expects recession (4:30 p.m.)Hong Kong revised down its estimate for economic growth this year, with the government now forecasting the first annual contraction since the global financial crisis a decade ago. Gross domestic product will contract 1.3% in 2019 from the previous year, the government said Friday as it released final output calculations for the third quarter.The government said ending the city’s violent unrest is key to an economic recovery.Police classify death as murder (1:31 p.m.)Police upgraded their probe into the injury of a 70-year-old government worker to a murder investigation after the man died overnight. The man was struck in the head by an object during a scuffle Wednesday between protesters who had set up road blocks and others who were attempting to clear them.The man appeared to be filming in the direction of a group of black-clad protesters when one of them “deliberately threw” an object at him, Chan Tin-chu, senior superintendent for criminal investigations in New Territories North, told reporters at a briefing Friday. The victim didn’t participate in the argument or the attempt to clear the road blocks, Chan said.Protesters start lunchtime rallies (12:40 p.m.)Groups of protesters begin gathering in the financial district for a lunchtime rally, one of several planned across the city. Many wore masks and carried umbrellas.Protesters also began assembling in the bustling Causeway Bay shopping district and in Tai Koo, on the eastern side of Hong Kong Island.Chinese officials condemn attack (12:15 p.m.)The Chinese government raised strong objections to the U.K. consulate in Hong Kong regarding the attack on the city’s justice secretary in London on Thursday. The Office of the Commissioner of the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Hong Kong also urged the U.K. government and police to punish those responsible for the attack on Teresa Cheng, according to a statement.Hurt 15-year-old still in hospital (8:56 a.m.)A 15-year-old boy who suffered a head injury from what local media said may have been a tear gas canister was still in Tuen Mun Hospital, the Hospital Authority said. The agency said the boy’s family asked that details of his condition -- which was originally listed as critical -- not be disclosed.Six people, ages 17 to 62, had been admitted to various hospitals for treatment for protest-related injuries overnight and this morning as of 7:30 a.m. All are in stable condition. The man shot by police in Sai Wan Ho on Monday is now in stable condition in Eastern Hospital. A man set on fire during an argument with protesters on the same day was still in critical condition at Prince of Wales Hospital.Group blames government for death (7:32 a.m.)A group of anonymous protesters that has occasionally spoken for the leaderless movement expressed “deepest condolences” for the death of a 70-year-old government worker Thursday, but blamed the incident on “police brutality” and government intransigence. “The HKSAR Government must concede to the Five Demands, and return to the table of politics to solve conflicts by political means,” the so-called Citizens’ Press Conference said in a statement Friday.Meanwhile, another protester group at the Chinese University of Hong Kong offered to remove barricades from the Tolo Highway in exchange for a government pledge to follow through with plans for District Council elections on Nov. 24, according to Radio Television Hong Kong. Students had already reopened one lane in each direction, the South China Morning Post said.Some trains still suspended (5:55 a.m.)Service between Fo Tan and Lo Wu and Lok Ma Chau on the East Rail Line are suspended due to vandalism, railway operator the MTR Corp. said Friday. Trains between Hung Hom and Fo Tan on the same line are running every five minutes. Stations at Mong Kok, Tseung Kwan O, Sai Wan Ho, Tuen Mun and Tung Chung also remain shut.Justice secretary ‘attacked’ (3:47 a.m.)Hong Kong Justice Secretary Teresa Cheng condemned what her office said was an attack by a “violent mob” that caused her “serious bodily harm” Thursday while she was on an official visit to London. Cheng fell and hurt her arm after being surrounded by a group of about 30 protesters, the South China Morning Post newspaper reported.“The secretary denounces all forms of violence and radicalism depriving others’ legitimate rights in the pretext of pursuing their political ideals, which would never be in the interest of Hong Kong and any civilized society,” Cheng’s office said in a statement.Agency ‘saddened’ by death (2:21 a.m.)Hong Kong’s Food and Environmental Hygiene Department confirmed that one of its contract workers had died Thursday from a head injury, expressing “profound sadness” over his death. The elderly worker “was suspected to be hit in his head by hard objects hurled by rioters during his lunch break,” the agency said in a statement, adding that it would provide assistance to the victim’s family.The government vowed to “make every effort to investigate the case to bring offenders to justice.”U.S. Senate advances bill (12:41 a.m.)The U.S. Senate is preparing for quick passage of legislation that would support pro-democracy protesters by placing Hong Kong’s special trading status with the U.S. under annual review. The Senate will run the “hotline” on the bill, which is an expedited process to check for last-minute opposition to bringing legislation immediately to a vote, according to Senator Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican.The Senate legislation is different than a version passed earlier by the House of Representatives. That means the two bills would have to be reconciled and passed by both chambers before going to President Donald Trump to be signed into law.Xi seeks end to violence (10:25 p.m. Thursday)Xi, currently on a visit to Brazil, said “continuing radical violent crimes in Hong Kong have seriously trampled on the rule of law and social order, seriously undermined Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability, and seriously challenged the bottom line of the ‘one country, two systems’ principle,” state broadcaster China Central Television reported in a social media post.“Stopping the violence and restoring order is Hong Kong’s most urgent task at present,” Xi said, reiterating support for Lam. “We will continue to firmly support the chief executive to lead the government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region in accordance with the law, firmly support the Hong Kong Police in law enforcement, and firmly support the Hong Kong judiciary in punishing violent criminals.”\--With assistance from Erin Roman, Daniel Flatley, Colin Keatinge and Dandan Li.To contact the reporters on this story: Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.net;Natalie Lung in Hong Kong at flung6@bloomberg.net;Dominic Lau in Hong Kong at dlau92@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 64/79   Will Ballots or Bullets Decide Hong Kong’s Upcoming Elections?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Laurel Chor/Bloomberg via GettyHONG KONG—“You have bullets. I have the right to vote.”Those were words found on banners and posters hoisted during peaceful demonstrations when one million, then two million people marched toward the government headquarters here in June. The message was simple: If you’re fighting for democracy, don’t forget to register to vote, and be sure to show up when it’s time.But before the ballots, the bullets have started flying.  A trigger-happy and ill-trained police force is constantly itching for a skirmish, this week placing a shot point-blank into a young man's chest. And the populace continues looking for ways to fight back, while keeping in mind that the big battle should still be at the voting booth.With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil WarIn the rest of China, there is no real democracy, but the terms by which the British signed over their former colony to Beijing 20 years ago made this a very special place, where the central government was part of the same country, but under a different system—one that is designed to continually undergo democratic reforms.Hong Kongers want to keep it that way, and have resorted to measures as innovative as they are desperate.On Tuesday, riot police surrounded a university campus only to face flaming arrows and walls of fire, with those on the front lines supported by ordinary citizens who replenish necessary supplies. Two days later, an elderly street cleaner died due to injuries sustained when he was hit during clashes.Months of street-level resistance have been calculated by the protesters to translate into some degree of political ownership and Hong Kong will soon have the opportunity to exercise its right to vote—or will it?District elections, where more than 1,100 candidates are running for 458 seats, are set for Nov. 24.But the city’s pro-Beijing politicians, along with Chinese state-run media, have called for cleared streets and “a return to peace” as prerequisites for district elections. In particular, Global Times threatened on Wednesday that Beijing may mobilize its Armed Police Force and People’s Liberation Army in what it calls “direct intervention.” The outlet’s chief editor has characterized the “black bloc” at the vanguard of the protests and its supporters in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy camp as “ISIS-like terrorists.” Hong Kongers, however, see them as crucial figures in their quest to counter or even shake off the Chinese Communist Party’s influence in local governance.The Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute has been consistently polling to monitor support levels for the Hong Kong government, the police force, and the black bloc movement. As of mid-October, over 70 percent of those polled wanted the city’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, to resign, while more than 80 percent agree that the city should have universal suffrage. (At present, Hong Kongers can vote for members of their legislative and district councils, but Beijing vets all candidates for the city’s top political leadership.)More tellingly, since June, when the massive anti-government protests kicked off, there has been a shrinking portion of people who identify as politically neutral, and a growing population that consider themselves to be localist or part of the democratic camp.And this is the statistic that the establishment worries about the most: support for Carrie Lam is at a mere 11 percent. Proximity to her could prove to be the downfall of some candidates running in this month’s district elections.Last week, China Daily said in a report that “the wish for Western-style liberal democracy is a malignant virus that infects places with weakened ideological immune systems.” Translation: Beijing demands an ideological cleansing in Hong Kong. If the Chinese Communist Party had its way, democratic elections here, however limited they may be under the current system, would be null and void.The situation deteriorated further after the death last week of Alex Chow, a 22-year-old man who sustained heavy injuries after falling from the third floor of a parking lot near a location where police were dispersing crowds. They subsequently faced allegations that they blocked an ambulance from reaching Chow. He was in critical condition for days and died of cardiac arrest.If the rage felt by Hong Kongers in the last few months was infectious, then the grief felt after Chow died was downright viral. Impromptu memorials spread across Hong Kong. A note left by Chow’s father at the parking lot where he fell simply read, “My child, your duty is over. Rest in peace. I am proud of you.”Vigils were held all over the city, and seething beneath the sorrow was outrage. One police officer was recorded on video saying he would pop Champagne to celebrate Chow’s death. Another shouted to a crowd, “Thank you for coming out to be shot by us!”While street-level actions like traffic disruptions and clashes with police have been conducted chiefly by high school and university students, a vast network of medical professionals, drivers, logistics professionals, lawyers, graphic designers, printers, pastors, and other volunteers provide various forms of support for the black bloc—ferrying protesters to safety, producing infographics and banners and posters, offering pro bono legal aid, and more.That assistance materialized in a crucial way when the Chinese University of Hong Kong—nicknamed “Rioters U” by pro-establishment figures—came under siege.Early on Tuesday morning, police amassed on its outskirts, then stormed the campus to make arrests. Many students, in full black and equipped with respirators, were quick to erect barricades with anything they could find—chairs from classrooms, tires, roadblocks, bricks, a car, and more. Lookouts climbed aluminum folding ladders to observe and relay information about police movements. Others prepared for clashes by collecting bows, arrows, javelins from the athletics department. The students filled glass bottles with flammable liquids to make Molotov cocktails. They even built a catapult.Over at another school, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, riot police dragged off a member of the university’s governing council to beat him up.Around 8,000 students live on the Chinese University’s campus. After dark, citizens formed human chains to pass supplies to the students. Police arrested some individuals who were attempting to take more toward campus, alleging that they had “stolen goods” in their possession.By evening, Chinese University’s vice chancellor managed to establish an agreement with the police force’s commanders for the riot police surrounding the campus to cease fire. However, when he approached the riot police to inform them of this development, they launched tear gas at him. Police reinforcements trickled in. The university fitness center was converted into a first aid station. During a respite, students slept on a running track and grass field.When asked why police superiors didn’t directly order frontline police to stop their barrage, the vice chancellor said, “They did already, a few times.” To put it plainly, there was a total breakdown in the police force’s chain of command. Attempts by superiors to deescalate the situation were refuted by officers on the ground.The campus hosts the city’s internet exchange point, where 99 percent of Hong Kong’s web traffic is routed through.Chinese University has ended its semester early. Kindergartens, primary schools, and secondary schools across the city were closed on Thursday. The University of Hong Kong and several other tertiary education institutions have suspended their classes on campus for the rest of the semester. There are professors who are holding classes in their own homes. Others are using Skype or other online tools to wrap up their courses.For days in a row, over in Central—the city’s busiest business district, where many multinational corporations and blue chip companies have their Asia Pacific headquarters—office staff, many in business attire, stalled traffic and occupied roads during their lunch breaks, lining up in formation to face off with riot police.Violence has been mounting across the city. On Monday morning and early afternoon, two black bloc protesters were shot with live rounds; a traffic cop rammed into protesters multiple times with his motorcycle; students on their way to school were stopped, lined up, and searched by police. A person was shot in the eye with a tear gas canister or rubber bullet, public transportation was set on fire or damaged, scuffles broke out between people who hold different political stances. A 57-year-old man who was arguing with protesters at a train station was splashed with a flammable liquid and set on fire; he was hospitalized with second degree burns mainly on his chest and arms.With that said, it’s important to distinguish the reactions to violent acts committed by protesters and the police force. After the man was set on fire, members of the black bloc and their supporters overwhelmingly condemned the attack and said the individual responsible should at a minimum sit out future street-level engagements. The police, however, doubled down to defend their officer who shot an unarmed protester point blank with no warning.On Wednesday night, another protester, dressed in full black, was found dead. Like Chow, he fell from a height.By Thursday morning, students at multiple universities had fortified the entrances to their schools and blocked roads that lead to their campuses. Supplies donated from all over the city streamed in. Notably, Polytechnic University is beside one of the People’s Liberation Army’s barracks in Hong Kong. Baptist University, which has fortifications to hinder police entry, too, is situated next to another PLA facility.Raining on China’s Big Parade: Hong Kong Protests Give the Lie to ‘One State, Two Systems’In the past week, altercations between individuals holding different political stances have become common. In some cases, they escalate quickly. On Wednesday, two groups hurled bricks and rocks at each other. One brick struck the head of a 70-year-old man who was hired by the government to clear debris from public areas. He was hospitalized and died on Thursday.A police spokesperson said on Thursday that university campuses are “just like cancer cells.” Carrie Lam has said previously that those who oppose her governance have “no stake in society.” This week, with renewed backing from Chinese Communist Party leader Xi Jinping, she went further to call Hong Kong’s protesters “the enemy of the people,” lifting language used by the most odious dictators and authoritarians in modern history.On Thursday, as legislators debated how to mitigate the violence that is unfolding in Hong Kong, with pro-Beijing figures laying the blame on university students and their educators, even toying with the idea of passing a “fake news law” like Singapore’s to censor media outlets publishing reports that are unfavorable to the government, office workers in Central occupied roads in the district again—for the fourth consecutive day. Nearby, someone wrote with black spray paint, “We will not forget Alex Chow.”In this city of more than 7.4 million people, Hong Kong has around 4 million registered voters. If the election isn’t postponed, November 24 will be the first time for Hong Kongers to vote since widespread, decentralized anti-government organization kicked off in June. Current sentiment is overwhelmingly against Carrie Lam and her supporters despite the black bloc’s increasingly violent tactics, largely because these public officials have consistently voiced support for the police.This election will be the first step for the black bloc and pro-democracy figures to seize more seats in the government—and more importantly, positions within the 1,200-member body that selects the chief executive.That is, if the elections happen.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Laurel Chor/Bloomberg via GettyHONG KONG—“You have bullets. I have the right to vote.”Those were words found on banners and posters hoisted during peaceful demonstrations when one million, then two million people marched toward the government headquarters here in June. The message was simple: If you’re fighting for democracy, don’t forget to register to vote, and be sure to show up when it’s time.But before the ballots, the bullets have started flying.  A trigger-happy and ill-trained police force is constantly itching for a skirmish, this week placing a shot point-blank into a young man's chest. And the populace continues looking for ways to fight back, while keeping in mind that the big battle should still be at the voting booth.With Rising Violence, China Pushes Hong Kong Toward Civil WarIn the rest of China, there is no real democracy, but the terms by which the British signed over their former colony to Beijing 20 years ago made this a very special place, where the central government was part of the same country, but under a different system—one that is designed to continually undergo democratic reforms.Hong Kongers want to keep it that way, and have resorted to measures as innovative as they are desperate.On Tuesday, riot police surrounded a university campus only to face flaming arrows and walls of fire, with those on the front lines supported by ordinary citizens who replenish necessary supplies. Two days later, an elderly street cleaner died due to injuries sustained when he was hit during clashes.Months of street-level resistance have been calculated by the protesters to translate into some degree of political ownership and Hong Kong will soon have the opportunity to exercise its right to vote—or will it?District elections, where more than 1,100 candidates are running for 458 seats, are set for Nov. 24.But the city’s pro-Beijing politicians, along with Chinese state-run media, have called for cleared streets and “a return to peace” as prerequisites for district elections. In particular, Global Times threatened on Wednesday that Beijing may mobilize its Armed Police Force and People’s Liberation Army in what it calls “direct intervention.” The outlet’s chief editor has characterized the “black bloc” at the vanguard of the protests and its supporters in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy camp as “ISIS-like terrorists.” Hong Kongers, however, see them as crucial figures in their quest to counter or even shake off the Chinese Communist Party’s influence in local governance.The Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute has been consistently polling to monitor support levels for the Hong Kong government, the police force, and the black bloc movement. As of mid-October, over 70 percent of those polled wanted the city’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, to resign, while more than 80 percent agree that the city should have universal suffrage. (At present, Hong Kongers can vote for members of their legislative and district councils, but Beijing vets all candidates for the city’s top political leadership.)More tellingly, since June, when the massive anti-government protests kicked off, there has been a shrinking portion of people who identify as politically neutral, and a growing population that consider themselves to be localist or part of the democratic camp.And this is the statistic that the establishment worries about the most: support for Carrie Lam is at a mere 11 percent. Proximity to her could prove to be the downfall of some candidates running in this month’s district elections.Last week, China Daily said in a report that “the wish for Western-style liberal democracy is a malignant virus that infects places with weakened ideological immune systems.” Translation: Beijing demands an ideological cleansing in Hong Kong. If the Chinese Communist Party had its way, democratic elections here, however limited they may be under the current system, would be null and void.The situation deteriorated further after the death last week of Alex Chow, a 22-year-old man who sustained heavy injuries after falling from the third floor of a parking lot near a location where police were dispersing crowds. They subsequently faced allegations that they blocked an ambulance from reaching Chow. He was in critical condition for days and died of cardiac arrest.If the rage felt by Hong Kongers in the last few months was infectious, then the grief felt after Chow died was downright viral. Impromptu memorials spread across Hong Kong. A note left by Chow’s father at the parking lot where he fell simply read, “My child, your duty is over. Rest in peace. I am proud of you.”Vigils were held all over the city, and seething beneath the sorrow was outrage. One police officer was recorded on video saying he would pop Champagne to celebrate Chow’s death. Another shouted to a crowd, “Thank you for coming out to be shot by us!”While street-level actions like traffic disruptions and clashes with police have been conducted chiefly by high school and university students, a vast network of medical professionals, drivers, logistics professionals, lawyers, graphic designers, printers, pastors, and other volunteers provide various forms of support for the black bloc—ferrying protesters to safety, producing infographics and banners and posters, offering pro bono legal aid, and more.That assistance materialized in a crucial way when the Chinese University of Hong Kong—nicknamed “Rioters U” by pro-establishment figures—came under siege.Early on Tuesday morning, police amassed on its outskirts, then stormed the campus to make arrests. Many students, in full black and equipped with respirators, were quick to erect barricades with anything they could find—chairs from classrooms, tires, roadblocks, bricks, a car, and more. Lookouts climbed aluminum folding ladders to observe and relay information about police movements. Others prepared for clashes by collecting bows, arrows, javelins from the athletics department. The students filled glass bottles with flammable liquids to make Molotov cocktails. They even built a catapult.Over at another school, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, riot police dragged off a member of the university’s governing council to beat him up.Around 8,000 students live on the Chinese University’s campus. After dark, citizens formed human chains to pass supplies to the students. Police arrested some individuals who were attempting to take more toward campus, alleging that they had “stolen goods” in their possession.By evening, Chinese University’s vice chancellor managed to establish an agreement with the police force’s commanders for the riot police surrounding the campus to cease fire. However, when he approached the riot police to inform them of this development, they launched tear gas at him. Police reinforcements trickled in. The university fitness center was converted into a first aid station. During a respite, students slept on a running track and grass field.When asked why police superiors didn’t directly order frontline police to stop their barrage, the vice chancellor said, “They did already, a few times.” To put it plainly, there was a total breakdown in the police force’s chain of command. Attempts by superiors to deescalate the situation were refuted by officers on the ground.The campus hosts the city’s internet exchange point, where 99 percent of Hong Kong’s web traffic is routed through.Chinese University has ended its semester early. Kindergartens, primary schools, and secondary schools across the city were closed on Thursday. The University of Hong Kong and several other tertiary education institutions have suspended their classes on campus for the rest of the semester. There are professors who are holding classes in their own homes. Others are using Skype or other online tools to wrap up their courses.For days in a row, over in Central—the city’s busiest business district, where many multinational corporations and blue chip companies have their Asia Pacific headquarters—office staff, many in business attire, stalled traffic and occupied roads during their lunch breaks, lining up in formation to face off with riot police.Violence has been mounting across the city. On Monday morning and early afternoon, two black bloc protesters were shot with live rounds; a traffic cop rammed into protesters multiple times with his motorcycle; students on their way to school were stopped, lined up, and searched by police. A person was shot in the eye with a tear gas canister or rubber bullet, public transportation was set on fire or damaged, scuffles broke out between people who hold different political stances. A 57-year-old man who was arguing with protesters at a train station was splashed with a flammable liquid and set on fire; he was hospitalized with second degree burns mainly on his chest and arms.With that said, it’s important to distinguish the reactions to violent acts committed by protesters and the police force. After the man was set on fire, members of the black bloc and their supporters overwhelmingly condemned the attack and said the individual responsible should at a minimum sit out future street-level engagements. The police, however, doubled down to defend their officer who shot an unarmed protester point blank with no warning.On Wednesday night, another protester, dressed in full black, was found dead. Like Chow, he fell from a height.By Thursday morning, students at multiple universities had fortified the entrances to their schools and blocked roads that lead to their campuses. Supplies donated from all over the city streamed in. Notably, Polytechnic University is beside one of the People’s Liberation Army’s barracks in Hong Kong. Baptist University, which has fortifications to hinder police entry, too, is situated next to another PLA facility.Raining on China’s Big Parade: Hong Kong Protests Give the Lie to ‘One State, Two Systems’In the past week, altercations between individuals holding different political stances have become common. In some cases, they escalate quickly. On Wednesday, two groups hurled bricks and rocks at each other. One brick struck the head of a 70-year-old man who was hired by the government to clear debris from public areas. He was hospitalized and died on Thursday.A police spokesperson said on Thursday that university campuses are “just like cancer cells.” Carrie Lam has said previously that those who oppose her governance have “no stake in society.” This week, with renewed backing from Chinese Communist Party leader Xi Jinping, she went further to call Hong Kong’s protesters “the enemy of the people,” lifting language used by the most odious dictators and authoritarians in modern history.On Thursday, as legislators debated how to mitigate the violence that is unfolding in Hong Kong, with pro-Beijing figures laying the blame on university students and their educators, even toying with the idea of passing a “fake news law” like Singapore’s to censor media outlets publishing reports that are unfavorable to the government, office workers in Central occupied roads in the district again—for the fourth consecutive day. Nearby, someone wrote with black spray paint, “We will not forget Alex Chow.”In this city of more than 7.4 million people, Hong Kong has around 4 million registered voters. If the election isn’t postponed, November 24 will be the first time for Hong Kongers to vote since widespread, decentralized anti-government organization kicked off in June. Current sentiment is overwhelmingly against Carrie Lam and her supporters despite the black bloc’s increasingly violent tactics, largely because these public officials have consistently voiced support for the police.This election will be the first step for the black bloc and pro-democracy figures to seize more seats in the government—and more importantly, positions within the 1,200-member body that selects the chief executive.That is, if the elections happen.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 65/79   Syria’s Assad says ‘resistance’ will force US troops out
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Syrian President Bashar Assad said in remarks broadcast Friday that the American presence in Syria will lead to armed “resistance” that will eventually force the U.S. troops to leave his country.  U.S. officials said this week that Washington will leave about 600 troops in Syria to fight the Islamic State group.

    Syrian President Bashar Assad said in remarks broadcast Friday that the American presence in Syria will lead to armed “resistance” that will eventually force the U.S. troops to leave his country. U.S. officials said this week that Washington will leave about 600 troops in Syria to fight the Islamic State group.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 66/79   Top Iraqi Shiite religious leader calls for new election law
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iraq’s most influential Shiite religious leader called Friday for a new election law that would restore public confidence in the system and give voters the opportunity to bring “new faces” to power.  Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani emphasized support for the demonstrators in his weekly religious sermon, saying none of their demands have been met so far and that electoral reform should be a priority.  At least 320 people have been killed and thousands have been wounded since the unrest began on Oct. 1, when protesters took to the streets in the tens of thousands outraged by what they said was widespread corruption, lack of job opportunities and poor basic services despite the country’s oil wealth.

    Iraq’s most influential Shiite religious leader called Friday for a new election law that would restore public confidence in the system and give voters the opportunity to bring “new faces” to power. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani emphasized support for the demonstrators in his weekly religious sermon, saying none of their demands have been met so far and that electoral reform should be a priority. At least 320 people have been killed and thousands have been wounded since the unrest began on Oct. 1, when protesters took to the streets in the tens of thousands outraged by what they said was widespread corruption, lack of job opportunities and poor basic services despite the country’s oil wealth.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 67/79   Brexit Bulletin: No More Backing Down
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Days to Brexit deadline: 77(Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to get the Brexit Bulletin in your inbox every weekday.Today in Brexit: Nigel Farage vows to “stand up and fight” Labour in every seat they hold.What’s happening? He’s not backing down. Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage insists his candidates will contest every Labour-held seat at the upcoming general election on Dec. 12, despite calls to clear the path for Prime Minister Boris Johnson to win a majority and deliver Brexit.It meant another jumpy day for the pound, which rose ahead of Farage’s appearance in Hull on Thursday before giving up those gains once he indicated that he’s not going away.There had been speculation that the Brexit Party would stand down from closely fought seats where the Conservatives want to unseat Labour incumbents, for fear of splitting the pro-Brexit vote. No way, said Nigel. “We’re going to stand up and fight Labour in every seat in this country, be in no doubt,” he said.The Labour party later made a splash with a pledge to deliver free full-fiber broadband for all nationwide within 10 years, thanks to a £20 billion ($26 billion) nationalization of BT Group Plc’s Openreach unit. Labour will announce the policy on Friday. BT was said to be caught off guard after earlier promises it wasn’t on the list for nationalization.Worried BT shareholders may be relieved to hear the assessment of the U.K.’s unofficial national polling guru, Sir John Curtice, who briefed reporters yesterday on how to interpret current opinion polls. Curtice was blunt about Labour’s prospects. “The chances of Labour winning a majority are as close to zero as it is possible to be,” he said.With a 10-point lead the Tories ought to win an overall majority, said Curtice, a professor of politics at Strathclyde University — “But that’s not a prediction,” he added. National polls won’t necessarily tell the whole story. “Because the Brexit Party are standing down in Conservative-held seats it could simply be a case of the Tories piling up more votes in the seats they are going to win anyway.”Nevertheless, Corbyn probably won’t need a majority of his own to open a path to Downing Street — with Johnson’s Tories isolated at Westminster over Brexit, Corbyn just needs to deny the prime minister outright victory.A message from our editors: Starting next week we’re going to send the Brexit Bulletin out later in the day.  We’ll stay focused on Brexit but we also want to keep you up-to-date on the U.K. general election race as it unfolds each day. Watch your inboxes at 5 p.m. London time. And please let us know if you have any feedback. Thanks for reading.Today’s Must-ReadsThe City of London is largely discounting an outright Labour victory and expects Corbyn, at most, to lead a coalition that would force him to moderate his policies, according to Bloomberg’s Tom Metcalf, Nishant Kumar and Benjamin Robertson. Uncertainty over U.K. citizens’ future status is prompting some EU firms to steer clear of hiring Brits, according to the Guardian. Almost everything about the upcoming election is unusual and unpredictable. Bloomberg’s Greg Ritchie, Hayley Warren, Jeremy Scott Diamond and Kitty Donaldson have an essential guide to the Brexit battlegrounds that will matter most on Dec. 12.Brexit in BriefHigh Street Spending | Boris Johnson made a pitch for votes in “overlooked” towns with a promise to revive high streets through tax breaks for local businesses and to reopen provincial railway lines. The policy aims to win over disaffected Labour voters in order to secure the parliamentary majority he craves.Play By The Rules | Incoming European Union trade commissioner Phil Hogan said an agreement on regulations and standards will be central to EU-U.K. talks on a free trade deal, and that the bloc is “ready to go” on negotiations once the withdrawal agreement is ratified. “I think the British public will demand and expect that their government will sign on to EU standards, because we have the highest standards in the world,” Hogan said in an RTE radio interview.Which Way Next? | A gauge of sterling volatility over the next month, which now covers trading on the day after the election, has climbed the most since the 2016 Brexit referendum. That implies the pound could either rally to about $1.32 or slide to $1.25, according to pricing in options markets.Holiday Bleus | British tourists have cut back on summer holidays in France, reducing nights spent in the country’s hotels in July, August and September to the lowest in at least 10 years, according to French statistics office Insee. U.K. visitors are the biggest group of foreign hotel guests in France and spent 3.26 million nights in the third quarter, down 13% from a year earlier.Time to Borrow  | U.K. bond markets remain sanguine about Labour’s plans to borrow to invest, suggesting investors are not worried yet about the party’s proposals, according to the Financial Times. Though many think the plans are not a good idea, the bond market is offering a “once in a generation opportunity for fiscal expansion’’ thanks to low yields.Want to keep up with Brexit?You can follow us @Brexit on Twitter, and listen to Bloomberg Westminster every weekday. It’s live at midday on Bloomberg Radio and is available as a podcast too. Share the Brexit Bulletin: Colleagues, friends and family can sign up here. For full EU coverage, try the Brussels Edition.For even more: Subscribe to Bloomberg All Access for our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, The Bloomberg Open and The Bloomberg Close.To contact the author of this story: Charlotte Ryan in London at cryan147@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Iain Rogers at irogers11@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    Days to Brexit deadline: 77(Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to get the Brexit Bulletin in your inbox every weekday.Today in Brexit: Nigel Farage vows to “stand up and fight” Labour in every seat they hold.What’s happening? He’s not backing down. Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage insists his candidates will contest every Labour-held seat at the upcoming general election on Dec. 12, despite calls to clear the path for Prime Minister Boris Johnson to win a majority and deliver Brexit.It meant another jumpy day for the pound, which rose ahead of Farage’s appearance in Hull on Thursday before giving up those gains once he indicated that he’s not going away.There had been speculation that the Brexit Party would stand down from closely fought seats where the Conservatives want to unseat Labour incumbents, for fear of splitting the pro-Brexit vote. No way, said Nigel. “We’re going to stand up and fight Labour in every seat in this country, be in no doubt,” he said.The Labour party later made a splash with a pledge to deliver free full-fiber broadband for all nationwide within 10 years, thanks to a £20 billion ($26 billion) nationalization of BT Group Plc’s Openreach unit. Labour will announce the policy on Friday. BT was said to be caught off guard after earlier promises it wasn’t on the list for nationalization.Worried BT shareholders may be relieved to hear the assessment of the U.K.’s unofficial national polling guru, Sir John Curtice, who briefed reporters yesterday on how to interpret current opinion polls. Curtice was blunt about Labour’s prospects. “The chances of Labour winning a majority are as close to zero as it is possible to be,” he said.With a 10-point lead the Tories ought to win an overall majority, said Curtice, a professor of politics at Strathclyde University — “But that’s not a prediction,” he added. National polls won’t necessarily tell the whole story. “Because the Brexit Party are standing down in Conservative-held seats it could simply be a case of the Tories piling up more votes in the seats they are going to win anyway.”Nevertheless, Corbyn probably won’t need a majority of his own to open a path to Downing Street — with Johnson’s Tories isolated at Westminster over Brexit, Corbyn just needs to deny the prime minister outright victory.A message from our editors: Starting next week we’re going to send the Brexit Bulletin out later in the day.  We’ll stay focused on Brexit but we also want to keep you up-to-date on the U.K. general election race as it unfolds each day. Watch your inboxes at 5 p.m. London time. And please let us know if you have any feedback. Thanks for reading.Today’s Must-ReadsThe City of London is largely discounting an outright Labour victory and expects Corbyn, at most, to lead a coalition that would force him to moderate his policies, according to Bloomberg’s Tom Metcalf, Nishant Kumar and Benjamin Robertson. Uncertainty over U.K. citizens’ future status is prompting some EU firms to steer clear of hiring Brits, according to the Guardian. Almost everything about the upcoming election is unusual and unpredictable. Bloomberg’s Greg Ritchie, Hayley Warren, Jeremy Scott Diamond and Kitty Donaldson have an essential guide to the Brexit battlegrounds that will matter most on Dec. 12.Brexit in BriefHigh Street Spending | Boris Johnson made a pitch for votes in “overlooked” towns with a promise to revive high streets through tax breaks for local businesses and to reopen provincial railway lines. The policy aims to win over disaffected Labour voters in order to secure the parliamentary majority he craves.Play By The Rules | Incoming European Union trade commissioner Phil Hogan said an agreement on regulations and standards will be central to EU-U.K. talks on a free trade deal, and that the bloc is “ready to go” on negotiations once the withdrawal agreement is ratified. “I think the British public will demand and expect that their government will sign on to EU standards, because we have the highest standards in the world,” Hogan said in an RTE radio interview.Which Way Next? | A gauge of sterling volatility over the next month, which now covers trading on the day after the election, has climbed the most since the 2016 Brexit referendum. That implies the pound could either rally to about $1.32 or slide to $1.25, according to pricing in options markets.Holiday Bleus | British tourists have cut back on summer holidays in France, reducing nights spent in the country’s hotels in July, August and September to the lowest in at least 10 years, according to French statistics office Insee. U.K. visitors are the biggest group of foreign hotel guests in France and spent 3.26 million nights in the third quarter, down 13% from a year earlier.Time to Borrow  | U.K. bond markets remain sanguine about Labour’s plans to borrow to invest, suggesting investors are not worried yet about the party’s proposals, according to the Financial Times. Though many think the plans are not a good idea, the bond market is offering a “once in a generation opportunity for fiscal expansion’’ thanks to low yields.Want to keep up with Brexit?You can follow us @Brexit on Twitter, and listen to Bloomberg Westminster every weekday. It’s live at midday on Bloomberg Radio and is available as a podcast too. Share the Brexit Bulletin: Colleagues, friends and family can sign up here. For full EU coverage, try the Brussels Edition.For even more: Subscribe to Bloomberg All Access for our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, The Bloomberg Open and The Bloomberg Close.To contact the author of this story: Charlotte Ryan in London at cryan147@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Iain Rogers at irogers11@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 68/79   Israel says it has completed Gaza strikes after rocket fire
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Israel said early Friday it has completed a series of airstrikes on targets linked to the Islamic Jihad militant group in Gaza after overnight rocket fire that rattled a day-old truce.  The Palestinian territory’s Hamas rulers, who kept to the sidelines of this week’s fighting, cancelled the weekly protests they organize along the perimeter fence without explanation — apparently in an effort to preserve the calm.  Israel reiterated that it was willing to abide by the cease-fire if there are no additional rocket attacks.

    Israel said early Friday it has completed a series of airstrikes on targets linked to the Islamic Jihad militant group in Gaza after overnight rocket fire that rattled a day-old truce. The Palestinian territory’s Hamas rulers, who kept to the sidelines of this week’s fighting, cancelled the weekly protests they organize along the perimeter fence without explanation — apparently in an effort to preserve the calm. Israel reiterated that it was willing to abide by the cease-fire if there are no additional rocket attacks.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 69/79   Egyptian woman fights unequal Islamic inheritance laws
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    One Egyptian woman is taking on the country’s inheritance laws that mean female heirs inherit half that of men.  Since her father's death last year, Huda Nasrallah, a Christian, has stood before three different judges to demand an equal share of the property left to her two brothers by their father.  Nasrallah, a 40-year-old Christian human rights lawyer, is now challenging the rulings in a higher court.

    One Egyptian woman is taking on the country’s inheritance laws that mean female heirs inherit half that of men. Since her father's death last year, Huda Nasrallah, a Christian, has stood before three different judges to demand an equal share of the property left to her two brothers by their father. Nasrallah, a 40-year-old Christian human rights lawyer, is now challenging the rulings in a higher court.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 70/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 71/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 72/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 73/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 74/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 75/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 76/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 77/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 78/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 79/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • Powered by Symfony 3.3
     
    Twitter Facebook LinkedIn