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10/14/2019 03 hours

  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


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  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 16/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 17/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 18/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 19/79   Singapore Central Bank Eases Policy as Economy Avoids Recession
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Singapore eased monetary policy for the first time since 2016, seeking to shore up growth as the trade-reliant economy narrowly missed falling into recession.The Monetary Authority of Singapore, which uses the exchange rate as its main policy tool, reduced “slightly the rate of appreciation” of the currency band, while keeping unchanged the width and the level at which it is centered.“MAS will continue to closely monitor economic developments and is prepared to recalibrate monetary policy should prospects for inflation and growth weaken significantly,” the central bank said.In a separate report, data showed gross domestic product rebounded from a contraction in the second quarter, gaining an annualized 0.6% in the third quarter from the previous three months. That was lower than the 1.2% median estimate in a Bloomberg survey of economists. Compared with a year ago, GDP rose 0.1%, unchanged from the second quarter.“GDP numbers, despite skirting a technical recession, do not make for an upbeat read,” said Vishnu Varathan, head of economics and strategy in Singapore. “The manufacturing recession continues. The outlook is at best hazy, if not gloomy.”The Singapore dollar gained after the decision, rising 0.1% to S$1.3719 against the U.S. currency as of 8:38 a.m. in Singapore.The monetary policy decision was predicted by 14 of the 22 economists surveyed by Bloomberg, with the remainder projecting a more aggressive move to a zero slope. The MAS held policy in April after tightening twice last year.Singapore’s growth is expected to pick up gradually next year, “although this projection is subject to considerable uncertainty in the external environment,” the MAS said. These are its latest projections for inflation and growth:GDP growth will likely be around the midpoint of 0-1% forecast range in 2019. The output gap has turned “slightly negative” and expected to persist into 2020Core inflation is expected to come in at the lower end of the 1-2% range in 2019 and average 0.5-1.5% in 2020All-items CPI is projected to be around 0.5% this year and average 0.5-1.5% in 2020“We think the MAS’ core inflation forecast for 2020 suggests the door for further easing is open, if needed,” said Divya Devesh, head of Southeast and South Asia currency research at Standard Chartered Plc in Singapore. The MAS guides the local dollar against a basket of its counterparts and adjusts the pace of its appreciation or depreciation by changing the slope, width and center of a currency band. It doesn’t disclose details of the basket, or the band or the pace of appreciation or depreciation.?Central bankers globally are taking a more dovish stance as U.S.-China tensions weigh on growth and as manufacturing weakness threatens to spill over into services sectors. In Singapore, authorities have taken a gradual approach as they monitor risks and keep a close watch on labor-market indicators that so far have stayed resilient.“You’re still going to be skating on relatively thin ice” through year-end and into 2020, Selena Ling, head of treasury research and strategy at Oversea-Chinese Banking Corp. in Singapore, said on Bloomberg Television. “In this current trade environment, there’s very, very little that monetary policy easing in itself can do to change the overall story.”\--With assistance from Tomoko Sato, Chua Baizhen, Niluksi Koswanage, Stephanie Phang, Melissa Cheok, Joyce Koh and Chester Yung.To contact the reporters on this story: Michelle Jamrisko in Singapore at mjamrisko@bloomberg.net;Ruth Carson in Singapore at rliew6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nasreen Seria at nseria@bloomberg.net, Michael S. ArnoldFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Singapore eased monetary policy for the first time since 2016, seeking to shore up growth as the trade-reliant economy narrowly missed falling into recession.The Monetary Authority of Singapore, which uses the exchange rate as its main policy tool, reduced “slightly the rate of appreciation” of the currency band, while keeping unchanged the width and the level at which it is centered.“MAS will continue to closely monitor economic developments and is prepared to recalibrate monetary policy should prospects for inflation and growth weaken significantly,” the central bank said.In a separate report, data showed gross domestic product rebounded from a contraction in the second quarter, gaining an annualized 0.6% in the third quarter from the previous three months. That was lower than the 1.2% median estimate in a Bloomberg survey of economists. Compared with a year ago, GDP rose 0.1%, unchanged from the second quarter.“GDP numbers, despite skirting a technical recession, do not make for an upbeat read,” said Vishnu Varathan, head of economics and strategy in Singapore. “The manufacturing recession continues. The outlook is at best hazy, if not gloomy.”The Singapore dollar gained after the decision, rising 0.1% to S$1.3719 against the U.S. currency as of 8:38 a.m. in Singapore.The monetary policy decision was predicted by 14 of the 22 economists surveyed by Bloomberg, with the remainder projecting a more aggressive move to a zero slope. The MAS held policy in April after tightening twice last year.Singapore’s growth is expected to pick up gradually next year, “although this projection is subject to considerable uncertainty in the external environment,” the MAS said. These are its latest projections for inflation and growth:GDP growth will likely be around the midpoint of 0-1% forecast range in 2019. The output gap has turned “slightly negative” and expected to persist into 2020Core inflation is expected to come in at the lower end of the 1-2% range in 2019 and average 0.5-1.5% in 2020All-items CPI is projected to be around 0.5% this year and average 0.5-1.5% in 2020“We think the MAS’ core inflation forecast for 2020 suggests the door for further easing is open, if needed,” said Divya Devesh, head of Southeast and South Asia currency research at Standard Chartered Plc in Singapore. The MAS guides the local dollar against a basket of its counterparts and adjusts the pace of its appreciation or depreciation by changing the slope, width and center of a currency band. It doesn’t disclose details of the basket, or the band or the pace of appreciation or depreciation.?Central bankers globally are taking a more dovish stance as U.S.-China tensions weigh on growth and as manufacturing weakness threatens to spill over into services sectors. In Singapore, authorities have taken a gradual approach as they monitor risks and keep a close watch on labor-market indicators that so far have stayed resilient.“You’re still going to be skating on relatively thin ice” through year-end and into 2020, Selena Ling, head of treasury research and strategy at Oversea-Chinese Banking Corp. in Singapore, said on Bloomberg Television. “In this current trade environment, there’s very, very little that monetary policy easing in itself can do to change the overall story.”\--With assistance from Tomoko Sato, Chua Baizhen, Niluksi Koswanage, Stephanie Phang, Melissa Cheok, Joyce Koh and Chester Yung.To contact the reporters on this story: Michelle Jamrisko in Singapore at mjamrisko@bloomberg.net;Ruth Carson in Singapore at rliew6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nasreen Seria at nseria@bloomberg.net, Michael S. ArnoldFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 20/79   Blue Star Limited (NSE:BLUESTARCO) Is Employing Capital Very Effectively
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll look at Blue Star Limited (NSE:BLUESTARCO) and reflect on its potential as an investment. Specifically...

    Today we'll look at Blue Star Limited (NSE:BLUESTARCO) and reflect on its potential as an investment. Specifically...


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  • 21/79   Asia shares cheered by Sino-.U.S. trade progress
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Liquidity was lacking, however, with Japan off and a partial market holiday in the United States for Columbus Day.  MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan  edged up 0.5%.  Australia's main index gained 0.9%  and South Korea  firmed 1.3%.

    Liquidity was lacking, however, with Japan off and a partial market holiday in the United States for Columbus Day. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan edged up 0.5%. Australia's main index gained 0.9% and South Korea firmed 1.3%.


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  • 22/79   Here's Why Fullwealth Construction Holdings (HKG:1034) Can Manage Its Debt Responsibly
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to...

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to...


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  • 23/79   Conoco Sells Australian Assets to Santos for $1.4 Billion
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- ConocoPhillips agreed to sell its northern Australia business to Santos Ltd. in a $1.4 billion deal that will boost the Adelaide-based oil and gas producer’s position in the growing Asian liquefied natural gas market.Conoco will sell its operating interests in the Darwin LNG processing plant, as well as the Bayu-Undan, Barossa and Poseidon gas fields. Santos, which headed for the highest close in almost five years, will fund the acquisition from existing cash and $750 million in new two-year debt, the company said in a statement.“The acquisition of these assets fully aligns with Santos’ growth strategy to build on existing infrastructure positions, while advancing our aim to be a leading regional LNG supplier,” Santos Chief Executive Officer Kevin Gallagher said in a media statement.Santos has been expanding its position in the Australian oil and gas market having acquired Quadrant Energy for about $2.15 billion in 2018 -- a deal which boosted the company’s annual production by almost a third. Its latest deal could help it become Australia’s top independent energy producer: Santos and Conoco’s northern Australia assets produced 94 million barrels of oil equivalent last year, compared to Woodside Petroleum Ltd’s 91.4 million.Conoco is the second U.S. energy major to announce plans to sell down its interests in Australia after Exxon Mobil Corp. in September said it would start a process to find a buyer for its Bass Strait producing assets off the coast of southeast Australia.“This transaction allows us to allocate capital to other projects that we believe will generate the highest long-term value to ConocoPhillips,” Conoco executive vice president and chief operating officer Matt Fox said in a statement. The company has been looking to return capital to shareholders, following cuts to payouts during the depths of the oil-market crash.Conoco is also operator of the Australia Pacific LNG export facility in Queensland, which is not part of the Santos deal.Top SpotSantos plans to sell 25% of Conoco’s interest in the Darwin LNG export plant to South Korean firm SK E&S as part of the agreement. The company is also in talks with the facility’s joint venture partners, which include Inpex Corp, Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd., Jera Co. and Italy’s Eni SpA, to sell equity in Barossa, which has been earmarked to back-fill the Darwin LNG plant once Bayu-Undan reserves run dry around the end of 2022. Santos will target ownership stakes in both the assets of 40%-50%.Gallagher said the company is in advanced discussions with LNG buyers for gas off-take from Barossa, including with an existing partner in Darwin LNG, and was looking to contract 60%-80% of gas volumes for the project prior to taking a final investment decision, which is expected in early 2020.Santos shares rose as much as 7.7% in Sydney trading on Monday, headed for their highest close since December 2014.Following the SK sell-down, Santos’ holding in Darwin LNG is expected to be 43.4%, with SK at 25%, Inpex at 11.4%, Eni at 11%, Jera at 6.1% and Tokyo Gas at 3.1%. Santos will hold 62.5% in Barossa, with SK owning the remaining 37.5%.(Updates with share reaction in second paragraph and details throughout)To contact the reporter on this story: James Thornhill in Sydney at jthornhill3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ramsey Al-Rikabi at ralrikabi@bloomberg.net, Aaron Clark, Jasmine NgFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- ConocoPhillips agreed to sell its northern Australia business to Santos Ltd. in a $1.4 billion deal that will boost the Adelaide-based oil and gas producer’s position in the growing Asian liquefied natural gas market.Conoco will sell its operating interests in the Darwin LNG processing plant, as well as the Bayu-Undan, Barossa and Poseidon gas fields. Santos, which headed for the highest close in almost five years, will fund the acquisition from existing cash and $750 million in new two-year debt, the company said in a statement.“The acquisition of these assets fully aligns with Santos’ growth strategy to build on existing infrastructure positions, while advancing our aim to be a leading regional LNG supplier,” Santos Chief Executive Officer Kevin Gallagher said in a media statement.Santos has been expanding its position in the Australian oil and gas market having acquired Quadrant Energy for about $2.15 billion in 2018 -- a deal which boosted the company’s annual production by almost a third. Its latest deal could help it become Australia’s top independent energy producer: Santos and Conoco’s northern Australia assets produced 94 million barrels of oil equivalent last year, compared to Woodside Petroleum Ltd’s 91.4 million.Conoco is the second U.S. energy major to announce plans to sell down its interests in Australia after Exxon Mobil Corp. in September said it would start a process to find a buyer for its Bass Strait producing assets off the coast of southeast Australia.“This transaction allows us to allocate capital to other projects that we believe will generate the highest long-term value to ConocoPhillips,” Conoco executive vice president and chief operating officer Matt Fox said in a statement. The company has been looking to return capital to shareholders, following cuts to payouts during the depths of the oil-market crash.Conoco is also operator of the Australia Pacific LNG export facility in Queensland, which is not part of the Santos deal.Top SpotSantos plans to sell 25% of Conoco’s interest in the Darwin LNG export plant to South Korean firm SK E&S as part of the agreement. The company is also in talks with the facility’s joint venture partners, which include Inpex Corp, Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd., Jera Co. and Italy’s Eni SpA, to sell equity in Barossa, which has been earmarked to back-fill the Darwin LNG plant once Bayu-Undan reserves run dry around the end of 2022. Santos will target ownership stakes in both the assets of 40%-50%.Gallagher said the company is in advanced discussions with LNG buyers for gas off-take from Barossa, including with an existing partner in Darwin LNG, and was looking to contract 60%-80% of gas volumes for the project prior to taking a final investment decision, which is expected in early 2020.Santos shares rose as much as 7.7% in Sydney trading on Monday, headed for their highest close since December 2014.Following the SK sell-down, Santos’ holding in Darwin LNG is expected to be 43.4%, with SK at 25%, Inpex at 11.4%, Eni at 11%, Jera at 6.1% and Tokyo Gas at 3.1%. Santos will hold 62.5% in Barossa, with SK owning the remaining 37.5%.(Updates with share reaction in second paragraph and details throughout)To contact the reporter on this story: James Thornhill in Sydney at jthornhill3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ramsey Al-Rikabi at ralrikabi@bloomberg.net, Aaron Clark, Jasmine NgFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 24/79   Oil prices edge up, supported by Iran ship attack, U.S.-China trade detente
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Oil prices were little changed on Monday, holding onto 2% gains from Friday amid renewed geopolitical tensions in the Middle East, while a detente in the U.S.-China trade war buoyed market sentiment.  Brent crude futures  rose 9 cents to $60.60 a barrel by 1208 GMT, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures  was at $54.79 a barrel, up 9 cents.  Most of the gains were posted on Friday after an Iranian oil tanker was attacked off Saudi Arabia's coast in the Red Sea.

    Oil prices were little changed on Monday, holding onto 2% gains from Friday amid renewed geopolitical tensions in the Middle East, while a detente in the U.S.-China trade war buoyed market sentiment. Brent crude futures rose 9 cents to $60.60 a barrel by 1208 GMT, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures was at $54.79 a barrel, up 9 cents. Most of the gains were posted on Friday after an Iranian oil tanker was attacked off Saudi Arabia's coast in the Red Sea.


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  • 25/79   How Much Are Qube Holdings Limited (ASX:QUB) Insiders Taking Off The Table?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. Unfortunately, there are...

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. Unfortunately, there are...


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  • 26/79   What Does McMillan Shakespeare Limited’s (ASX:MMS) 18% ROCE Say About The Business?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we are going to look at McMillan Shakespeare Limited (ASX:MMS) to see whether it might be an attractive...

    Today we are going to look at McMillan Shakespeare Limited (ASX:MMS) to see whether it might be an attractive...


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  • 27/79   How Does Rushil Décor's (NSE:RUSHIL) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After The Share Price Drop?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Unfortunately for some shareholders, the Rushil Décor (NSE:RUSHIL) share price has dived 33% in the last thirty days...

    Unfortunately for some shareholders, the Rushil Décor (NSE:RUSHIL) share price has dived 33% in the last thirty days...


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  • 28/79   Saint John Henry Newman, of the Church, in the World
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    I first heard of John Henry Newman when I was 18. I had just been admitted to Oriel College, Oxford. (I was one of the handful of Americans who go there every year as undergraduates.) Oxford’s colleges are more than a dorm or a fraternity but less than separate schools, and Newman — along with perhaps Cecil Rhodes and Walter Raleigh — was the most famous man (so Wikipedia told me) to have been associated with Oriel. A cousin of mine, a Catholic priest, gave me his portrait as a graduation gift. Gifts were not uncommon in my family, but even so, this was unusual: Clearly it had taken some doing to track down this antique colored lithograph somewhere in Greater Philadelphia.Even though I had had a reasonably good education in both European history and my Catholic religion, I had not learned Newman’s story growing up. I soon found I was not alone in this: The same was true of the other young people I knew, from both sides of the Atlantic, who spotted his portrait, distinctive in cardinal’s robes, in our dining hall. The stranger thing was that the smartest people I knew, especially of an older generation, were far more likely to have heard of him — and those who had heard of him tended to revere him. He seemed to be a treat and an inspiration that the intelligentsia had kept for themselves, rather than popularized for the pubic — much as everyone knows Shakespeare or Mozart, but Spenser or Mahler are held back, albeit inadvertently, for the initiated.With any luck, after his canonization this weekend, Newman will shift into the category of the better-known. His story is extraordinary. One of the brightest professors at Oxford in the early 1820s and ’30s, he was a leading light of a party in the Church of England (known, unsurprisingly, as the Oxford Movement) that pressed for a rediscovery of that church’s catholic roots. To oversimplify: This group argued that the Anglican Church had separated from Rome not on core doctrinal but on political grounds; that it still held the apostolic succession and the core catholic beliefs (indeed, sometimes going as far as to say that these were more perfectly preserved in Britain than in Rome); and that the Anglican Church should rediscover and celebrate this identity.It is generally understood today that the 19th century was a time when men took religion seriously. What’s less well remembered is that for much of it, the composition of Christianity in England was highly contested, far more so than the stereotype of stolid Anglican establishment would suggest. A landmark — and never repeated — religious census conducted in 1851 showed that only half the population was Anglican, of which only half again were observant, while half the total population were “dissenters” — usually evangelicals. Though these figures come from a generation after the Oxford Movement was at its peak, they illustrate well the extent to which the quality of Britain’s Christianity was up for debate. Viewed in this light, it is easier to see how the Tractarian controversy (as the Oxford Movement and its counter-reactions came to be known) became one of the most hotly debated issues in England throughout the 1830s and ’40s.As Newman relates in his spiritual autobiography, Apologia Pro Sua Vita (A defense of one’s life), the more he pressed into the history of the early Church Fathers, the more he became disturbed by the thought that the modern Catholic, rather than Anglican, Church was the one true church, judged by the standards he had advanced. Meanwhile, through a complicated series of maneuvers, the bulk of the Anglican establishment made it clear that they were protestant, not catholic, in principle as well as in organization. If Newman were to have the courage of his convictions, the only way open — so it seemed clear to him — was to Rome.The most moving part of the Apologia is where Newman details the anguish this double realization gave him. It is hard today to capture the taboo against Catholicism that pervaded his world. An establishment WASP in the 1950s simultaneously announcing he was gay, a Communist, and an atheist would not even come close in the pain he caused his friends and family, or felt himself. For three hundred years, “popery” had been conceived of as the primary political as well as religious opponent of the British — the foe behind every foe in war, the core ideological enemy of British liberties, the anti-Christ in religion. Newman’s conversion was explosive; his sacrifice — in the eyes of many contemporaries, very nearly a crime — was great and public. His separation from Oxford in particular, which, as he relates, he only ever saw again in the form of the spires visible from the passing railroad, was a sort of living martyrdom.At this point, history goes in one direction; Newman, in another. The Anglican Church, Oxford, and the British nation as a whole soon rounded into the high imperial period, driven by religion of either the evangelical or middle-of-the-road variety. The Oxford Movement was shattered. Meanwhile, Newman, instead of leading a party within the English church, became: Newman. An institution in his own right, he continued to write and preach with the same amazing intellect that had marked his early years. In time, indeed, he became (generally) respected for his sincerity of conviction, and even something of a Victorian establishment. Yet he was, inevitably, a world apart from the driving forces of his country and period.But the lives of saints are very long indeed (as Newman’s own reading of the Church Fathers shows us). His greatest impact may yet be to come.Newman has special relevancy to us today, and not just because he is in the news this weekend. The mutual understanding of the Catholic and Anglo-American worldview, though greatly advanced since Newman’s day, is nevertheless still less than one might hope. To be sure, because the center of political power in the English-speaking world has shifted to America, that world is far more Catholic (and on both sides of the Atlantic, far more tolerant). But the fact remains that the leading Christian church and the preeminent temporal power understand each other imperfectly — a fact that can be seen in everything from Pope Francis’s offhand political remarks (not ex cathedra, but ex airplane seat), to certain recurrent political controversies, to even the Ahmari–French dispute that has recently rocked American conservatism. Newman’s struggle, personal and intellectual, was throughout his life to live in both of these worlds — English-speaking civil society and the Catholic Church — and be true to the best and most necessary parts of both.There are reasons to be hopeful that studying this life and works of the newly canonized saint will become easier going forward. In December, Eamon Duffy, a great historian of British Christianity, is releasing a short and accessible biography of the professor-priest. More generally, one can expect that his works will receive the greater attention and popularization that attend most prominent saints. And there is good reason to pray for the same.When I did make it up to Oxford, in time I became the college Catholic representative — a bit of student-government formality that meant, among other things, attending meetings in Newman’s old rooms and organizing a termly Mass in his former chapel. Even then, it was generally acknowledged — as this weekend it has been formally acknowledged — that one was treading in the footsteps of a saint. Saint John Henry Newman, pray for us. We need it.

    I first heard of John Henry Newman when I was 18. I had just been admitted to Oriel College, Oxford. (I was one of the handful of Americans who go there every year as undergraduates.) Oxford’s colleges are more than a dorm or a fraternity but less than separate schools, and Newman — along with perhaps Cecil Rhodes and Walter Raleigh — was the most famous man (so Wikipedia told me) to have been associated with Oriel. A cousin of mine, a Catholic priest, gave me his portrait as a graduation gift. Gifts were not uncommon in my family, but even so, this was unusual: Clearly it had taken some doing to track down this antique colored lithograph somewhere in Greater Philadelphia.Even though I had had a reasonably good education in both European history and my Catholic religion, I had not learned Newman’s story growing up. I soon found I was not alone in this: The same was true of the other young people I knew, from both sides of the Atlantic, who spotted his portrait, distinctive in cardinal’s robes, in our dining hall. The stranger thing was that the smartest people I knew, especially of an older generation, were far more likely to have heard of him — and those who had heard of him tended to revere him. He seemed to be a treat and an inspiration that the intelligentsia had kept for themselves, rather than popularized for the pubic — much as everyone knows Shakespeare or Mozart, but Spenser or Mahler are held back, albeit inadvertently, for the initiated.With any luck, after his canonization this weekend, Newman will shift into the category of the better-known. His story is extraordinary. One of the brightest professors at Oxford in the early 1820s and ’30s, he was a leading light of a party in the Church of England (known, unsurprisingly, as the Oxford Movement) that pressed for a rediscovery of that church’s catholic roots. To oversimplify: This group argued that the Anglican Church had separated from Rome not on core doctrinal but on political grounds; that it still held the apostolic succession and the core catholic beliefs (indeed, sometimes going as far as to say that these were more perfectly preserved in Britain than in Rome); and that the Anglican Church should rediscover and celebrate this identity.It is generally understood today that the 19th century was a time when men took religion seriously. What’s less well remembered is that for much of it, the composition of Christianity in England was highly contested, far more so than the stereotype of stolid Anglican establishment would suggest. A landmark — and never repeated — religious census conducted in 1851 showed that only half the population was Anglican, of which only half again were observant, while half the total population were “dissenters” — usually evangelicals. Though these figures come from a generation after the Oxford Movement was at its peak, they illustrate well the extent to which the quality of Britain’s Christianity was up for debate. Viewed in this light, it is easier to see how the Tractarian controversy (as the Oxford Movement and its counter-reactions came to be known) became one of the most hotly debated issues in England throughout the 1830s and ’40s.As Newman relates in his spiritual autobiography, Apologia Pro Sua Vita (A defense of one’s life), the more he pressed into the history of the early Church Fathers, the more he became disturbed by the thought that the modern Catholic, rather than Anglican, Church was the one true church, judged by the standards he had advanced. Meanwhile, through a complicated series of maneuvers, the bulk of the Anglican establishment made it clear that they were protestant, not catholic, in principle as well as in organization. If Newman were to have the courage of his convictions, the only way open — so it seemed clear to him — was to Rome.The most moving part of the Apologia is where Newman details the anguish this double realization gave him. It is hard today to capture the taboo against Catholicism that pervaded his world. An establishment WASP in the 1950s simultaneously announcing he was gay, a Communist, and an atheist would not even come close in the pain he caused his friends and family, or felt himself. For three hundred years, “popery” had been conceived of as the primary political as well as religious opponent of the British — the foe behind every foe in war, the core ideological enemy of British liberties, the anti-Christ in religion. Newman’s conversion was explosive; his sacrifice — in the eyes of many contemporaries, very nearly a crime — was great and public. His separation from Oxford in particular, which, as he relates, he only ever saw again in the form of the spires visible from the passing railroad, was a sort of living martyrdom.At this point, history goes in one direction; Newman, in another. The Anglican Church, Oxford, and the British nation as a whole soon rounded into the high imperial period, driven by religion of either the evangelical or middle-of-the-road variety. The Oxford Movement was shattered. Meanwhile, Newman, instead of leading a party within the English church, became: Newman. An institution in his own right, he continued to write and preach with the same amazing intellect that had marked his early years. In time, indeed, he became (generally) respected for his sincerity of conviction, and even something of a Victorian establishment. Yet he was, inevitably, a world apart from the driving forces of his country and period.But the lives of saints are very long indeed (as Newman’s own reading of the Church Fathers shows us). His greatest impact may yet be to come.Newman has special relevancy to us today, and not just because he is in the news this weekend. The mutual understanding of the Catholic and Anglo-American worldview, though greatly advanced since Newman’s day, is nevertheless still less than one might hope. To be sure, because the center of political power in the English-speaking world has shifted to America, that world is far more Catholic (and on both sides of the Atlantic, far more tolerant). But the fact remains that the leading Christian church and the preeminent temporal power understand each other imperfectly — a fact that can be seen in everything from Pope Francis’s offhand political remarks (not ex cathedra, but ex airplane seat), to certain recurrent political controversies, to even the Ahmari–French dispute that has recently rocked American conservatism. Newman’s struggle, personal and intellectual, was throughout his life to live in both of these worlds — English-speaking civil society and the Catholic Church — and be true to the best and most necessary parts of both.There are reasons to be hopeful that studying this life and works of the newly canonized saint will become easier going forward. In December, Eamon Duffy, a great historian of British Christianity, is releasing a short and accessible biography of the professor-priest. More generally, one can expect that his works will receive the greater attention and popularization that attend most prominent saints. And there is good reason to pray for the same.When I did make it up to Oxford, in time I became the college Catholic representative — a bit of student-government formality that meant, among other things, attending meetings in Newman’s old rooms and organizing a termly Mass in his former chapel. Even then, it was generally acknowledged — as this weekend it has been formally acknowledged — that one was treading in the footsteps of a saint. Saint John Henry Newman, pray for us. We need it.


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  • 29/79   Is Shougang Concord Century Holdings (HKG:103) A Risky Investment?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says...

    The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says...


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  • 30/79   Did Changing Sentiment Drive Pavillon Holdings's (SGX:596) Share Price Down A Painful 88%?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Some stocks are best avoided. We don't wish catastrophic capital loss on anyone. Imagine if you held Pavillon Holdings...

    Some stocks are best avoided. We don't wish catastrophic capital loss on anyone. Imagine if you held Pavillon Holdings...


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  • 31/79   Chinese Shoppers and Investors Are Losing Their Appetite for Gold
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- China’s shoppers and investors lost their appetite for gold this year -- and there’s little expectation of any major improvement in 2020 as slowing growth and higher prices crimp consumer spending.Jewelry consumption is forecast to drop 4% to about 660 tons this year, according to forecasts from Metals Focus Ltd., while a decline of more than 20% to around 240 tons is seen for investment demand.Slowing growth and concerns over the trade war have hit consumer sentiment and a rally in prices is keeping some investors away, said Nikos Kavalis, a director at the London-based research firm. He expects demand to stabilize next year.Economic growth in the world’s biggest gold consumer is sputtering. The official forecast of 6% to 6.5% is the slowest on record, and the 6.2% pace reported in the second quarter is the weakest since the government began releasing data in 1992.“The economic conditions in the country are throwing a spanner in the works and that’s keeping jewelry consumption under pressure,” said Kavalis. The prolonged trade war and soaring local food prices have crimped consumer spending for discretionary products, he said.Signs of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations lifted U.S. equities Friday and sent Treasury yields higher, though sentiment may be capped as investors voiced skepticism on the accord.Another factor hurting demand has been the weaker yuan. While Chinese shoppers may be shying away from buying gold, investors worldwide are piling in to bullion. That’s pushed spotprices up 16% this year after hitting $1,557.11 an ounce last month, the highest in more than six years.“Back in 2017 and 2018, you had a boost in demand from more sophisticated type investors buying gold as a hedge against RMB depreciation,” said Kavalis. “Following the rise in the gold price that we’ve seen in the summer, it looks like there is less of that because now a lot of these investors are also worried that the gold price is looking rich.”The price rally from June saw China’s jewelry demand grinding to a halt, with showrooms reportedly deserted toward the end of the second quarter, the World Gold Council said in its quarterly report. Still, the retail landscape continues to develop as leading brands expand their networks and extend their reach into lower-tier cities, the council said.“The perspective now, particularly looking at the jewelry market, is moderate growth over the longer run, rather than the sort of massive growth you saw in the past when people were opening stores like crazy,” said Philip Klapwijk, managing director of Hong Kong-based consultant Precious Metals Insights Ltd. “The pace of that growth isn’t going to be what it used to be.”Klapwijk, who’s also a chief consultant at Metals Focus, will be moderating a panel at the Global Precious Metals Conference in Shenzhen that runs Oct. 13-15. The China Gold Association’s Chairman Xin Song is due to make opening remarks at the annual event organized by the London Bullion Market Association.The country’s imports will drop sharply this year as many Chinese investors cashed in their purchases made in 2012 and 2013 after prices rallied this year, said Zhang Yongtao, secretary general of the China Gold Association. This has boosted domestic supply and reduced the need for imports, he added.China’s imports of gold in unwrought forms fell 42% to about 561 tons from February to August in 2019, from the same period a year ago, according to data on the customs website.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Ranjeetha Pakiam in Singapore at rpakiam@bloomberg.net;Winnie Zhu in Shanghai at wzhu4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Phoebe Sedgman at psedgman2@bloomberg.net, Keith GosmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- China’s shoppers and investors lost their appetite for gold this year -- and there’s little expectation of any major improvement in 2020 as slowing growth and higher prices crimp consumer spending.Jewelry consumption is forecast to drop 4% to about 660 tons this year, according to forecasts from Metals Focus Ltd., while a decline of more than 20% to around 240 tons is seen for investment demand.Slowing growth and concerns over the trade war have hit consumer sentiment and a rally in prices is keeping some investors away, said Nikos Kavalis, a director at the London-based research firm. He expects demand to stabilize next year.Economic growth in the world’s biggest gold consumer is sputtering. The official forecast of 6% to 6.5% is the slowest on record, and the 6.2% pace reported in the second quarter is the weakest since the government began releasing data in 1992.“The economic conditions in the country are throwing a spanner in the works and that’s keeping jewelry consumption under pressure,” said Kavalis. The prolonged trade war and soaring local food prices have crimped consumer spending for discretionary products, he said.Signs of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations lifted U.S. equities Friday and sent Treasury yields higher, though sentiment may be capped as investors voiced skepticism on the accord.Another factor hurting demand has been the weaker yuan. While Chinese shoppers may be shying away from buying gold, investors worldwide are piling in to bullion. That’s pushed spotprices up 16% this year after hitting $1,557.11 an ounce last month, the highest in more than six years.“Back in 2017 and 2018, you had a boost in demand from more sophisticated type investors buying gold as a hedge against RMB depreciation,” said Kavalis. “Following the rise in the gold price that we’ve seen in the summer, it looks like there is less of that because now a lot of these investors are also worried that the gold price is looking rich.”The price rally from June saw China’s jewelry demand grinding to a halt, with showrooms reportedly deserted toward the end of the second quarter, the World Gold Council said in its quarterly report. Still, the retail landscape continues to develop as leading brands expand their networks and extend their reach into lower-tier cities, the council said.“The perspective now, particularly looking at the jewelry market, is moderate growth over the longer run, rather than the sort of massive growth you saw in the past when people were opening stores like crazy,” said Philip Klapwijk, managing director of Hong Kong-based consultant Precious Metals Insights Ltd. “The pace of that growth isn’t going to be what it used to be.”Klapwijk, who’s also a chief consultant at Metals Focus, will be moderating a panel at the Global Precious Metals Conference in Shenzhen that runs Oct. 13-15. The China Gold Association’s Chairman Xin Song is due to make opening remarks at the annual event organized by the London Bullion Market Association.The country’s imports will drop sharply this year as many Chinese investors cashed in their purchases made in 2012 and 2013 after prices rallied this year, said Zhang Yongtao, secretary general of the China Gold Association. This has boosted domestic supply and reduced the need for imports, he added.China’s imports of gold in unwrought forms fell 42% to about 561 tons from February to August in 2019, from the same period a year ago, according to data on the customs website.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Ranjeetha Pakiam in Singapore at rpakiam@bloomberg.net;Winnie Zhu in Shanghai at wzhu4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Phoebe Sedgman at psedgman2@bloomberg.net, Keith GosmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 32/79   Did Changing Sentiment Drive Universal Technologies Holdings's (HKG:1026) Share Price Down A Worrying 54%?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We think intelligent long term investing is the way to go. But unfortunately, some companies simply don't succeed. For...

    We think intelligent long term investing is the way to go. But unfortunately, some companies simply don't succeed. For...


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  • 33/79   Aries Agro Limited (NSE:ARIES) Has Attractive Fundamentals
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Attractive stocks have exceptional fundamentals. In the case of Aries Agro Limited (NSE:ARIES), there's is a company...

    Attractive stocks have exceptional fundamentals. In the case of Aries Agro Limited (NSE:ARIES), there's is a company...


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  • 34/79   Stocks in Asia Advance After Trade Progress: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks began the week with gains after signs of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations, though sentiment was capped as investors voiced skepticism on the accord.Shares in Seoul and Sydney opened higher and equity futures pointed higher in Hong Kong -- Japan will be shut for a holiday. S&P 500 futures edged up after the U.S. equities gauge climbed to within 1.8% of a record on Friday. President Donald Trump said the two sides agreed to the outlines of a deal that could be signed as early as next month. The yuan was steady after Friday’s advance and Treasury futures ticked up following the pickup in yields last week.The Singapore dollar rose after the Monetary Authority of Singapore eased monetary policy for the first time since 2016. The U.S. won’t increase tariffs on China as scheduled this week as part of a “phase one” trade accord. Beijing will make large agricultural purchases and take steps on intellectual property, financial services and the yuan. A Chinese statement didn’t refer to a deal, saying only that “the two sides have made substantial progress,” and mentioning neither the freeze on duties nor the farm-goods commitment.“Let’s not get carried away,” said Raoul Leering, head of international trade research at ING Bank NV. “There is a very tough journey ahead for the U.S. and Chinese negotiators to cut a deal that really has substance.”Elsewhere, the pound retreated as European Union negotiators warned that Brexit plans from U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson are not yet good enough to be the basis for an agreement.Focus now turns to earnings season that begins with big U.S. banks including JPMorgan Chase & Co., Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Morgan Stanley. Trading may be think due to the Columbus Day holiday in the U.S. as well as the closure in Tokyo.Here are some key events coming up this week:The International Monetary Fund and World Bank host meetings to discuss economic development and finance.St. Louis Fed President James Bullard speaks at Bloomberg’s monetary and financial policy conference in London. Riksbank Governor Stefan Ingves also speaks there. Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic speaks in Atlanta. San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly gives a speech in Los Angeles.Wednesday bring a monetary policy decision in South Korea.U.S. retail sales are forecast to increase for a seventh straight month. Sales in the “control group” are also expected to rise. Consumer spending is carrying the weight of U.S. economic growth so the data will be monitored closely for any signs of slowing.China releases third-quarter GDP, September industrial production and retail sales data on Friday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index rose 0.3% as of 8:08 a.m. in Hong Kong. The underlying gauge added 1.1% on Friday.South Korea’s Kospi Index climbed 1.3%. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index gained 0.9%.CurrenciesThe yen was at 108.36 per dollar, down 0.1%.The offshore yuan rose 0.1% to 7.0771 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was steady after dropping 0.4% on Friday.The euro bought $1.1030, down 0.1%.The British pound slid 0.5% to $1.2605.BondsFutures on 10-year Treasuries added 0.1%. The yield on 10-year notes gained six basis points to 1.73% on Friday.Australia’s 10-year yield rose seven basis points to 1.08%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 0.2% to $54.90 a barrel.Gold decreased 0.2% to $1,485.85 an ounce.\--With assistance from Sophie Caronello and Mark Tannenbaum.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Joanna Ossinger, James LuddenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks began the week with gains after signs of progress in U.S.-China trade negotiations, though sentiment was capped as investors voiced skepticism on the accord.Shares in Seoul and Sydney opened higher and equity futures pointed higher in Hong Kong -- Japan will be shut for a holiday. S&P 500 futures edged up after the U.S. equities gauge climbed to within 1.8% of a record on Friday. President Donald Trump said the two sides agreed to the outlines of a deal that could be signed as early as next month. The yuan was steady after Friday’s advance and Treasury futures ticked up following the pickup in yields last week.The Singapore dollar rose after the Monetary Authority of Singapore eased monetary policy for the first time since 2016. The U.S. won’t increase tariffs on China as scheduled this week as part of a “phase one” trade accord. Beijing will make large agricultural purchases and take steps on intellectual property, financial services and the yuan. A Chinese statement didn’t refer to a deal, saying only that “the two sides have made substantial progress,” and mentioning neither the freeze on duties nor the farm-goods commitment.“Let’s not get carried away,” said Raoul Leering, head of international trade research at ING Bank NV. “There is a very tough journey ahead for the U.S. and Chinese negotiators to cut a deal that really has substance.”Elsewhere, the pound retreated as European Union negotiators warned that Brexit plans from U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson are not yet good enough to be the basis for an agreement.Focus now turns to earnings season that begins with big U.S. banks including JPMorgan Chase & Co., Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Morgan Stanley. Trading may be think due to the Columbus Day holiday in the U.S. as well as the closure in Tokyo.Here are some key events coming up this week:The International Monetary Fund and World Bank host meetings to discuss economic development and finance.St. Louis Fed President James Bullard speaks at Bloomberg’s monetary and financial policy conference in London. Riksbank Governor Stefan Ingves also speaks there. Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic speaks in Atlanta. San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly gives a speech in Los Angeles.Wednesday bring a monetary policy decision in South Korea.U.S. retail sales are forecast to increase for a seventh straight month. Sales in the “control group” are also expected to rise. Consumer spending is carrying the weight of U.S. economic growth so the data will be monitored closely for any signs of slowing.China releases third-quarter GDP, September industrial production and retail sales data on Friday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index rose 0.3% as of 8:08 a.m. in Hong Kong. The underlying gauge added 1.1% on Friday.South Korea’s Kospi Index climbed 1.3%. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index gained 0.9%.CurrenciesThe yen was at 108.36 per dollar, down 0.1%.The offshore yuan rose 0.1% to 7.0771 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was steady after dropping 0.4% on Friday.The euro bought $1.1030, down 0.1%.The British pound slid 0.5% to $1.2605.BondsFutures on 10-year Treasuries added 0.1%. The yield on 10-year notes gained six basis points to 1.73% on Friday.Australia’s 10-year yield rose seven basis points to 1.08%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 0.2% to $54.90 a barrel.Gold decreased 0.2% to $1,485.85 an ounce.\--With assistance from Sophie Caronello and Mark Tannenbaum.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Joanna Ossinger, James LuddenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 35/79   Is China Tian Lun Gas Holdings (HKG:1600) A Risky Investment?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of...

    Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of...


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  • 36/79   Is Now The Time To Put Apollo Hospitals Enterprise (NSE:APOLLOHOSP) On Your Watchlist?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It's only natural that many investors, especially those who are new to the game, prefer to buy shares in 'sexy' stocks...

    It's only natural that many investors, especially those who are new to the game, prefer to buy shares in 'sexy' stocks...


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  • 37/79   China Denied U.S. Lawmakers Visas Over Taiwan Visit
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- China denied entry visas to a U.S. congressional delegation, with Chinese officials telling one congressman’s staff members the visas would be granted for their trip only if they canceled a stop in Taiwan.Representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a New York Democrat, said in a Wall Street Journal op-ed that the quid pro quo amounted to “visa blackmail, designed to stanch the longstanding tradition of robust U.S. congressional engagement with Taiwan.“Maloney warned Beijing that “ham-handed and obtusely enforced pressure campaigns“ will only “invigorate congressional support for Taiwan.” He said he will be exploring ways for Congress to “reinforce U.S. support for Taiwan” in the coming months, though did not give any indication as to whether congressional leaders or the White House had signed on to his intentions.China and Taiwan have been governed separately since a nationalist government fled to Taipei more than 70 years ago during a civil war with Mao Zedong’s Communists. China considers Taiwan part of its territory and hasn’t ruled out military force to assert control over it.U.S. support for Taiwan recently has been expanding, with Senator Ted Cruz, a Texas Republican, last week becoming the first U.S. senator to attend a National Day event in Taipei in 35 years.Meanwhile, Senator Cory Gardner, a Colorado Republican, and Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu also wrote a commentary last week in the Washington-based Hill newspaper, calling for strengthening Taiwan-U.S. relations to counter rising Chinese influence in the Pacific.To contact the reporter on this story: Derek Wallbank in Singapore at dwallbank@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chua Baizhen at bchua14@bloomberg.net, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- China denied entry visas to a U.S. congressional delegation, with Chinese officials telling one congressman’s staff members the visas would be granted for their trip only if they canceled a stop in Taiwan.Representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a New York Democrat, said in a Wall Street Journal op-ed that the quid pro quo amounted to “visa blackmail, designed to stanch the longstanding tradition of robust U.S. congressional engagement with Taiwan.“Maloney warned Beijing that “ham-handed and obtusely enforced pressure campaigns“ will only “invigorate congressional support for Taiwan.” He said he will be exploring ways for Congress to “reinforce U.S. support for Taiwan” in the coming months, though did not give any indication as to whether congressional leaders or the White House had signed on to his intentions.China and Taiwan have been governed separately since a nationalist government fled to Taipei more than 70 years ago during a civil war with Mao Zedong’s Communists. China considers Taiwan part of its territory and hasn’t ruled out military force to assert control over it.U.S. support for Taiwan recently has been expanding, with Senator Ted Cruz, a Texas Republican, last week becoming the first U.S. senator to attend a National Day event in Taipei in 35 years.Meanwhile, Senator Cory Gardner, a Colorado Republican, and Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu also wrote a commentary last week in the Washington-based Hill newspaper, calling for strengthening Taiwan-U.S. relations to counter rising Chinese influence in the Pacific.To contact the reporter on this story: Derek Wallbank in Singapore at dwallbank@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chua Baizhen at bchua14@bloomberg.net, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 38/79   Shareholders Should Look Hard At Allcargo Logistics Limited’s (NSE:ALLCARGO) 13%Return On Capital
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll look at Allcargo Logistics Limited (NSE:ALLCARGO) and reflect on its potential as an investment. To be...

    Today we'll look at Allcargo Logistics Limited (NSE:ALLCARGO) and reflect on its potential as an investment. To be...


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  • 39/79   If You Had Bought Aarti Drugs (NSE:AARTIDRUGS) Shares Five Years Ago You'd Have Made 33%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Aarti Drugs Limited (NSE:AARTIDRUGS) shareholders might be concerned after seeing the share price drop 10% in the last...

    Aarti Drugs Limited (NSE:AARTIDRUGS) shareholders might be concerned after seeing the share price drop 10% in the last...


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  • 40/79   U.S. to pull last troops from north Syria; Syrian army to redeploy on border
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON/BEIRUT (Reuters) - The United States said on Sunday it will withdraw its remaining 1,000 troops from northern Syria in the face of a Turkish offensive and Syria's army struck a deal with Kurdish forces to redeploy along its border with Turkey, both major victories for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.  The developments illustrate Washington's waning influence over events in Syria and the failure of the U.S. policy of keeping Assad from reasserting state authority over areas lost during the more than eight-year conflict with rebels trying to end his rule.

    WASHINGTON/BEIRUT (Reuters) - The United States said on Sunday it will withdraw its remaining 1,000 troops from northern Syria in the face of a Turkish offensive and Syria's army struck a deal with Kurdish forces to redeploy along its border with Turkey, both major victories for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The developments illustrate Washington's waning influence over events in Syria and the failure of the U.S. policy of keeping Assad from reasserting state authority over areas lost during the more than eight-year conflict with rebels trying to end his rule.


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  • 41/79   The Latest: Powerful typhoon reaches greater Tokyo area
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Helicopters are plucking people from their flooded homes as rescue efforts went into full force in wide areas of Japan, including Tokyo, after a powerful typhoon unleashed heavy rainfall, leaving at least four dead and 17 missing.  Typhoon Hagibis made landfall south of Tokyo Saturday and moved northward.  Several train service in the Tokyo area resumed early morning.

    Helicopters are plucking people from their flooded homes as rescue efforts went into full force in wide areas of Japan, including Tokyo, after a powerful typhoon unleashed heavy rainfall, leaving at least four dead and 17 missing. Typhoon Hagibis made landfall south of Tokyo Saturday and moved northward. Several train service in the Tokyo area resumed early morning.


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  • 42/79   BEHOLD: Is China's DF-26 Missile a Real Threat to U.S. Navy Aircraft Carriers?
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Will Beijing's strategy work?

    Will Beijing's strategy work?


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  • 43/79   Police: Woman killed by 6-foot log pushed off cliff in Ohio state park; 2 teens charged
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Ohio investigators say the six-foot log was pushed or thrown off the cliff in the Hocking Hills State Park. Two teens have been charged.

    Ohio investigators say the six-foot log was pushed or thrown off the cliff in the Hocking Hills State Park. Two teens have been charged.


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  • 44/79   Police Respond to Reports of Mall Shooting in Florida, Confirm One Person Injured
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Authorities have not yet identified the circumstances which led to the shooting

    Authorities have not yet identified the circumstances which led to the shooting


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  • 45/79   Harry Dunn: US woman allegedly involved in crash does not have diplomatic immunity, says Foreign Office
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The US diplomat’s wife allegedly involved in a crash which killed a teenager does not have diplomatic immunity, the Foreign Office has said.A letter, that appears to have been sent by foreign secretary Dominic Raab to Harry Dunn’s parents, Charlotte Charles and Tim Dunn, says: “The question remains when such immunity comes to an end, regardless of any waiver.

    The US diplomat’s wife allegedly involved in a crash which killed a teenager does not have diplomatic immunity, the Foreign Office has said.A letter, that appears to have been sent by foreign secretary Dominic Raab to Harry Dunn’s parents, Charlotte Charles and Tim Dunn, says: “The question remains when such immunity comes to an end, regardless of any waiver.


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  • 46/79   EU Seeks to Halt U.S. Tariffs Over Airbus Aid in Last-Gasp Plea
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The European Union made a last-ditch appeal to the U.S. to refrain from triggering retaliatory tariffs over illegal subsidies to Airbus SE, warning of economic harm to both sides and repeating a call for a negotiated solution.European Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom told her U.S. counterpart, Robert Lighthizer, that his plan to hit $7.5 billion of EU goods ranging from planes to whiskey with duties would compel the EU to apply countermeasures in a parallel lawsuit over market-distorting aid to Boeing Co. U.S. levies would make a negotiated settlement harder to reach, she said.“I strongly believe that imposing additional tariffs in the two aircraft cases is not a solution,” Malmstrom said in an Oct. 11 letter to Lighthizer seen by Bloomberg News. “It would only inflict damage on businesses and put at risk jobs on both sides of the Atlantic, harm global trade and the broader aviation industry at a sensitive time.”The World Trade Organization is due to give final approval for U.S. retaliation in the Airbus case on Monday, allowing tariffs to kick in as planned on Friday.The trans-Atlantic dispute over aircraft aid risks fraying a trade truce struck between the U.S. and EU in July 2018. At the time, both sides pledged to try to scale back commercial barriers and avoid a repeat of tit-for-tat tariffs that began with President Donald Trump’s duties on European steel and aluminum on U.S. national-security grounds.The WTO cases over subsidies to Airbus and Boeing are 15 years old. Because of the calendar, the U.S. is entitled to strike first and the EU would follow suit sometime in 2020.Malmstrom gave no sign in her letter to Lighthizer that an idea floated in some EU circles for quicker European retaliation is gaining ground. The idea weighed was to hit back by invoking an unrelated, older WTO case against a now-defunct U.S. tax break given to companies, including Boeing, via subsidiaries known as foreign sales corporations.Instead, Malmstrom said the EU’s planned countermeasures of $12 billion would be applied “when the time comes on the parallel Boeing case.”Aside from causing economic harm, hastier European retaliation could undermine the EU’s claim to be working to uphold the WTO system that Trump’s protectionism is shaking.“We are ready to negotiate a settlement for both the Airbus and the Boeing case addressing remaining compliance obligations on both sides, putting these cases behind us,” Malmstrom said.To contact the reporter on this story: Jonathan Stearns in Brussels at jstearns2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Tony Czuczka, Linus ChuaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The European Union made a last-ditch appeal to the U.S. to refrain from triggering retaliatory tariffs over illegal subsidies to Airbus SE, warning of economic harm to both sides and repeating a call for a negotiated solution.European Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom told her U.S. counterpart, Robert Lighthizer, that his plan to hit $7.5 billion of EU goods ranging from planes to whiskey with duties would compel the EU to apply countermeasures in a parallel lawsuit over market-distorting aid to Boeing Co. U.S. levies would make a negotiated settlement harder to reach, she said.“I strongly believe that imposing additional tariffs in the two aircraft cases is not a solution,” Malmstrom said in an Oct. 11 letter to Lighthizer seen by Bloomberg News. “It would only inflict damage on businesses and put at risk jobs on both sides of the Atlantic, harm global trade and the broader aviation industry at a sensitive time.”The World Trade Organization is due to give final approval for U.S. retaliation in the Airbus case on Monday, allowing tariffs to kick in as planned on Friday.The trans-Atlantic dispute over aircraft aid risks fraying a trade truce struck between the U.S. and EU in July 2018. At the time, both sides pledged to try to scale back commercial barriers and avoid a repeat of tit-for-tat tariffs that began with President Donald Trump’s duties on European steel and aluminum on U.S. national-security grounds.The WTO cases over subsidies to Airbus and Boeing are 15 years old. Because of the calendar, the U.S. is entitled to strike first and the EU would follow suit sometime in 2020.Malmstrom gave no sign in her letter to Lighthizer that an idea floated in some EU circles for quicker European retaliation is gaining ground. The idea weighed was to hit back by invoking an unrelated, older WTO case against a now-defunct U.S. tax break given to companies, including Boeing, via subsidiaries known as foreign sales corporations.Instead, Malmstrom said the EU’s planned countermeasures of $12 billion would be applied “when the time comes on the parallel Boeing case.”Aside from causing economic harm, hastier European retaliation could undermine the EU’s claim to be working to uphold the WTO system that Trump’s protectionism is shaking.“We are ready to negotiate a settlement for both the Airbus and the Boeing case addressing remaining compliance obligations on both sides, putting these cases behind us,” Malmstrom said.To contact the reporter on this story: Jonathan Stearns in Brussels at jstearns2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Tony Czuczka, Linus ChuaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 47/79   Deadly protests set stage for Iran, US tug-of-war over Iraq
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Iraq's deadliest wave of protests since the 2003 ouster of dictator Saddam Hussein has made the country vulnerable to a battle for influence between its two main competing allies, the United States and Iran, analysts say.  The anti-government protests that erupted on October 1 echoed the demands that young Iraqis have made over recent years.  'Without this context, Iran would not have intervened,' Iraqi political analyst Munqith Dagher said.

    Iraq's deadliest wave of protests since the 2003 ouster of dictator Saddam Hussein has made the country vulnerable to a battle for influence between its two main competing allies, the United States and Iran, analysts say. The anti-government protests that erupted on October 1 echoed the demands that young Iraqis have made over recent years. 'Without this context, Iran would not have intervened,' Iraqi political analyst Munqith Dagher said.


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  • 48/79   Latest: Southern California wildfire is now 33% contained
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Los Angeles County Fire Department says the wildfire in the San Fernando Valley is now 33% contained.  The department says Saturday night that winds and temperatures have fallen to normal levels after the Santa Ana winds passed through the region.  A man went into cardiac arrest and died at the scene of a wildfire that broke out late Thursday.

    The Los Angeles County Fire Department says the wildfire in the San Fernando Valley is now 33% contained. The department says Saturday night that winds and temperatures have fallen to normal levels after the Santa Ana winds passed through the region. A man went into cardiac arrest and died at the scene of a wildfire that broke out late Thursday.


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  • 49/79   Russia's New Nuclear Weapon Is A Real Doomsday Device (And Aimed At America)
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    If you can't beat them, destroy them.

    If you can't beat them, destroy them.


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  • 50/79   New evidence shows how asteroid dust cloud may have sparked new life on Earth 470m years ago
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Isotope found in seabed sediment points to clash of solar bodies near Mars, study suggests. Astronomers have discovered intriguing evidence that an asteroid break-up blanketed Earth with dust millions of years ago. The event dramatically cooled the planet and triggered an ice age that was followed by major increases in numbers of new animal species. The work, led by Birger Schmitz of Lund University in Sweden, was recently published in Science Advances and provides new insight into the impact of interplanetary events on our planet’s evolution. “We know about the 10km asteroid that crashed on Earth 67 million years ago and killed off the dinosaurs, but this event was very different,” Schmitz told the Observer. “It occurred about 470 million years ago when an asteroid 3,000 times bigger than the dinosaurs-killer was destroyed during a collision with another asteroid beyond the orbit of Mars. It filled the solar system with dust and caused a major dimming of sunlight falling on Earth.” Reduced radiation caused Earth to cool significantly, setting off a succession of ice ages. Water froze, ice caps spread and sea levels dropped, creating isolated shallow seas that were ideal for generating new species. Cold water also holds more dissolved oxygen, which would also have boosted speciation. Scientists already knew ice ages appeared at this time and that life went through a spectacular increase in biodiversity, particularly in the sea. The first coral reefs began to grow then, and strange tentacled predators called nautiloids appeared. This is known as the great Ordovician biodiversification event, or Gobe. Scientists have argued over the cause of Gobe, but now Schmitz, after studying dust particles in seabed sediments laid down at this time, says it was triggered by clouds of asteroid dust. “The sediments laid down at this time are rich in the isotope helium-3 – which they could only have picked up travelling through space,” he said. “It is a crucial clue.” Other scientists have backed his idea. “It isn’t necessarily the answer to every question we have about Gobe, but it certainly ties together a lot of observations,” Rebecca Freeman, of the University of Kentucky, Lexington, told the journal Science recently. However, Schmitz’s research has also caused interest for another reason. As the world warms dangerously, some scientists have proposed spreading a veil of dust that would sit in space above the Earth and reflect sunlight away from our overheating planet. The idea is controversial because it could have many unpleasant side-effects, say critics. Now evidence shows such an experiment occurred naturally 470 million years ago. The result was a major change in our meteorology and the evolution of life here. “It is certainly worth bearing in my mind in coming years,” added Schmitz.

    Isotope found in seabed sediment points to clash of solar bodies near Mars, study suggests. Astronomers have discovered intriguing evidence that an asteroid break-up blanketed Earth with dust millions of years ago. The event dramatically cooled the planet and triggered an ice age that was followed by major increases in numbers of new animal species. The work, led by Birger Schmitz of Lund University in Sweden, was recently published in Science Advances and provides new insight into the impact of interplanetary events on our planet’s evolution. “We know about the 10km asteroid that crashed on Earth 67 million years ago and killed off the dinosaurs, but this event was very different,” Schmitz told the Observer. “It occurred about 470 million years ago when an asteroid 3,000 times bigger than the dinosaurs-killer was destroyed during a collision with another asteroid beyond the orbit of Mars. It filled the solar system with dust and caused a major dimming of sunlight falling on Earth.” Reduced radiation caused Earth to cool significantly, setting off a succession of ice ages. Water froze, ice caps spread and sea levels dropped, creating isolated shallow seas that were ideal for generating new species. Cold water also holds more dissolved oxygen, which would also have boosted speciation. Scientists already knew ice ages appeared at this time and that life went through a spectacular increase in biodiversity, particularly in the sea. The first coral reefs began to grow then, and strange tentacled predators called nautiloids appeared. This is known as the great Ordovician biodiversification event, or Gobe. Scientists have argued over the cause of Gobe, but now Schmitz, after studying dust particles in seabed sediments laid down at this time, says it was triggered by clouds of asteroid dust. “The sediments laid down at this time are rich in the isotope helium-3 – which they could only have picked up travelling through space,” he said. “It is a crucial clue.” Other scientists have backed his idea. “It isn’t necessarily the answer to every question we have about Gobe, but it certainly ties together a lot of observations,” Rebecca Freeman, of the University of Kentucky, Lexington, told the journal Science recently. However, Schmitz’s research has also caused interest for another reason. As the world warms dangerously, some scientists have proposed spreading a veil of dust that would sit in space above the Earth and reflect sunlight away from our overheating planet. The idea is controversial because it could have many unpleasant side-effects, say critics. Now evidence shows such an experiment occurred naturally 470 million years ago. The result was a major change in our meteorology and the evolution of life here. “It is certainly worth bearing in my mind in coming years,” added Schmitz.


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  • 51/79   NASA confirms Boeing’s latest timetable for Starliner space taxi’s final tests
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA confirmed today that Boeing is scheduled to conduct the next high-profile test of its CST-100 Starliner space capsule in a little more than three weeks. The target data for Starliner's pad abort test is set for Nov. 4 at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, NASA said. That's in line with the plan that Boeing executive John Mulholland laid out earlier this week at a New Mexico space symposium. If next month's test is successful, Boeing would target Dec. 17 for the launch of an uncrewed Starliner to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station… Read More

    NASA confirmed today that Boeing is scheduled to conduct the next high-profile test of its CST-100 Starliner space capsule in a little more than three weeks. The target data for Starliner's pad abort test is set for Nov. 4 at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, NASA said. That's in line with the plan that Boeing executive John Mulholland laid out earlier this week at a New Mexico space symposium. If next month's test is successful, Boeing would target Dec. 17 for the launch of an uncrewed Starliner to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station… Read More


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  • 52/79   Artificial meat is now made in space, coming to a supermarket near you
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Creating meat from cells is no longer the realm of science fiction: a Russian cosmonaut did it aboard the International Space Station, and it is just a matter of time before these products arrive in supermarkets.  Tests carried out in space in September led to the production of beef, rabbit and fish tissue using a 3D printer.  This new technology 'could make long-term travel possible and renew space exploration,' to Mars for example, said Didier Toubia, the head of the Israeli startup Aleph Farms, which provided cells for the tests.

    Creating meat from cells is no longer the realm of science fiction: a Russian cosmonaut did it aboard the International Space Station, and it is just a matter of time before these products arrive in supermarkets. Tests carried out in space in September led to the production of beef, rabbit and fish tissue using a 3D printer. This new technology 'could make long-term travel possible and renew space exploration,' to Mars for example, said Didier Toubia, the head of the Israeli startup Aleph Farms, which provided cells for the tests.


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  • 53/79   NASA launches satellite to explore where air meets space
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA launched a satellite on Thursday night to explore the mysterious, dynamic region where air meets space.  Five seconds after the satellite's release, the attached Pegasus rocket ignited, sending Icon on its way.  It's in constant flux as space weather bombards it from above and Earth weather from below, sometimes disrupting radio communications.

    NASA launched a satellite on Thursday night to explore the mysterious, dynamic region where air meets space. Five seconds after the satellite's release, the attached Pegasus rocket ignited, sending Icon on its way. It's in constant flux as space weather bombards it from above and Earth weather from below, sometimes disrupting radio communications.


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  • 54/79   Climate Change Is Shaping Up As an Utter Disaster for Much of America's Bird Life
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Two thirds of American bird species are at risk, according to a new report

    Two thirds of American bird species are at risk, according to a new report


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  • 55/79   A NASA image shows the center of our galaxy in unprecedented detail. Expect far more revealing photos from a soon-to-launch telescope.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope will bring

    NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope will bring "the highest-quality image ever obtained of the galactic center," one researcher said.


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  • 56/79   Study: China's Military Domination over Asia is Not Guaranteed
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A study published several years ago by Michael Beckley, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Tufts University, was published in the academic journal International Security. In the article, Beckley argues that China’s neighbors could thwart Chinese military aggression through anti-access/area denial strategies with only minimal U.S. assistance.

    A study published several years ago by Michael Beckley, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Tufts University, was published in the academic journal International Security. In the article, Beckley argues that China’s neighbors could thwart Chinese military aggression through anti-access/area denial strategies with only minimal U.S. assistance.


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  • 57/79   Did Chinese Scientists Just Create a New Material to Build 'Super' Stealth Fighters?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Doesn't seem like it.

    Doesn't seem like it.


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  • 58/79   Who Would Firebomb a Homeless Encampment?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    LOS ANGELES -- The incendiary device came shooting toward the homeless encampment without words or warning. Arthur Garza, 29, heard a pop against his tent, then saw the object, which he described as a

    LOS ANGELES -- The incendiary device came shooting toward the homeless encampment without words or warning. Arthur Garza, 29, heard a pop against his tent, then saw the object, which he described as a "mortar" or "firecracker," bounce into the street and explode."It was like shooting stars everywhere," Garza said.In a matter of minutes, flames were climbing the incline of dirt and brush under the interchange of the 2 and 134 freeways in Eagle Rock, Los Angeles. Stray embers jumped eight lanes of highway to ignite land in the adjoining city of Glendale.Garza and others in the encampment acted quickly, setting their water supply on the flames and raking brush to halt the fire's spread. They were aware and worried, Garza said, that the homeless might be blamed. Ultimately, some 300 firefighters and multiple water-dropping helicopters were deployed to hold back the blaze. A hundred homes were evacuated, though no structures were lost. Forty-five acres burned.Encampments like Garza's have become firm fixtures of LA's landscape as the homelessness crisis gets steadily worse. Now, with fire season underway, city officials are growing anxious about the uptick in blazes that start in makeshift communities. The city is technically barred from removing homeless people from public areas. But last month, the LA City Council passed a safety measure that allows for the arrest of homeless people who refuse to leave high-risk fire zones.The case of Eagle Rock, however, shows that the threat can also come from outside the camps.A Shocking ArrestSix days after the attack on Aug. 25, Daniel Michael Nogueira and Bryan Antonio Araujo-Cabrera, both 25 and of Los Angeles, were arrested on suspicion of sparking the fire. Nogueira was booked on a felony count, while Araujo-Cabrera was booked on a misdemeanor.It was a shock to the middle-class community of Eagle Rock. Nogueira is the son of Michael Nogueira, the president of the Eagle Rock Chamber of Commerce and a big booster of the local farmers' market and Concerts in the Park series. The elder Nogueira is known around town as "Sir Michael," the name of his party-rental business, and his family home, surrounded by a white-picket fence, has been well known for its elaborate decorations each Halloween and for hosting rollicking gatherings on boxing match nights.Announcing the arrests in a sternly worded release, the Los Angeles Fire Department said investigators used "burn patterns, witness statements and surveillance videos" to identify its suspects. The department "determined the fire was an intentional act" and said the homeless were the targets. No motive was mentioned.The job of the LAFD's arson investigators is even more challenging in a climate-changing California: the threat of devastating fires has essentially gone year-round. The unit was founded as the Arson Squad in 1918, and a century later, is known as the Arson/Counter-Terrorism Section, an evolution that officials said has become necessary to confronting threats in a world beset with climate change and terrorism. In the fall and early winter, the danger becomes more potent. The dry Santa Ana winds scream across the basins, and the sun seems to burn meaner, capable of igniting dried-out growth at the slightest provocation.In this case, firefighters stayed at the burn zone for two days to make sure it was completely extinguished. "We remember the Oakland Hills fire, which killed 25 people," said Brian Humphrey, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Fire Department, referring to the 1991 Bay Area firestorm that started after embers from a fire put down a day before reignited in heavy winds.The day after his arrest, the younger Nogueira posted $1 million bail. Araujo-Cabrera was released on Sept. 14. The Los Angeles District Attorney's Office has not formally charged either with any crimes. A spokesman for that office said the DA is requesting further evidence. The Nogueira family declined to comment.One of the arson investigators, LAFD Capt. Tim Halloran, said he could not discuss details about the incident, citing the ongoing inquiry, but made it clear that the department will keep pursuing charges."Obviously it's our desire to bring the perpetrators of this crime to justice," Halloran said.A Citywide CrisisThere have been several notable homeless-related fires over the past few years. In December 2017, a cooking fire at a homeless encampment in a ravine off the 405 sparked the Skirball Fire, burning 422 acres and six Bel Air homes.This summer, homeless-encampment-related fires also sprung up in Pacoima, where an abandoned house taken over by squatters burned for a second time; in South Los Angeles, where an encampment in an alley burned, badly damaging a house; and in the Sepulveda Basin, where about 100 people were living, some for many years.The uptick, generally, is undeniable. Humphrey, of the LAFD, said, "In the number of fires related to homeless encampments, in which the homeless are present -- whether they are the cause is not certain -- the answer is yes, we are seeing an increasing trend."But in three fires in September alone, all of which left unhoused people dead or seriously injured -- in Van Nuys, Glendale, and in South LA -- arson is suspected. In late August, an unhoused musician in downtown LA's Skid Row was targeted in an arson attack and died days later. And the Los Angeles Police Department is currently investigating a case, in Echo Park, in which an explosive device was thrown at a homeless encampment on Oct. 6.The Rev. Andy Bales, one of the most respected homeless advocates in Skid Row, and chief of the Union Rescue Mission, said the rise in attacks on homeless Angelenos is inexcusable, but sees it as a raw reflection of the dissatisfaction with official efforts to alleviate the crisis. Every night, despite billions of taxpayer dollars poured onto the problem, nearly 59,000 people sleep on the streets of Los Angeles County. The countywide homeless count rose 12% over the past year."Unfortunately, some folks that have twisted thinking are getting so angry about the situation," Bales said. "This has become absolutely a growing concern, fanatical vigilantism."Bales said he supervises a Facebook page related to homelessness concerns, "and more and more people are calling for others to arm themselves, saying things like, 'Round them all up like cattle, and ship them either to Mexico or the desert.'""I can't tell you how many posts I have to delete," he said.Makeshift habitations are everywhere -- set up under or near freeways, in ravines or canyons and creek beds, and on public land away from view. Eventually, some encampments are pushed onto the sidewalks, where a cat-and-mouse ritual ensues with sanitation workers.One of the persistent myths about the homeless is that they are largely from out of town, a sort of foreign invasion. Yet, the Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count finds that roughly two-thirds of unsheltered adults have lived in LA County 10 years or more.And the difference between those on the street and those in permanent dwellings can be a matter of degrees. For example, as it happens, the younger Nogueira was arrested for attacking an encampment that houses a former neighbor. Arthur Garza's last home address was three houses down from the place where the Nogueiras live now, on Eagle Rock's tony Hill Drive.Back Under the FreewayGarza is back in the place he currently calls home, under beams holding up sheets of vinyl tarp, strung up along tents and umbrellas. The freeway traffic overhead creates an unending droning noise.Living on the streets, homeless people in LA often fall victim to sexual assault, mental illness or drug addiction. Garza has faced multiple arrests since becoming homeless, county jail records show. Some were related to narcotics, he said. "I basically never had any police contact until I started living on the street."He was kicked out of his last formal address by relatives in 2014, he said, in what he described as a dispute over an inheritance. (Repeated attempts to contact Garza's relatives at his old Hill Drive address were unsuccessful.) He has been living on the streets ever since.These days, Garza works part-time for a small upholstery tools manufacturer, just a few doors away from where he sleeps. Jerry Preusser, the shop owner, spoke effusively about his employee's work ethic, and he said that he's tried to offer Garza a room in his home."I've helped him a lot and he's done a lot to change," Preusser said. But habits, he added, are hard to break, and the cycle of homelessness itself becomes an anchor: "You don't imagine your life out of that."Although they once lived on the same block, Garza said he and Nogueira didn't know each other growing up. But he's long been aware of the Nogueira family. When he heard that Daniel Nogueira was arrested, Garza recalled saying, "That's Sir Michael's son."Garza said his conditions overall have not changed. Drivers routinely throw trash at him or honk aggressively. LA sanitation sweepers come by, threatening to haul off his property if he doesn't move it. Garza carts his stuff to other locations, and then back. He zips around Eagle Rock on an electric longboard, and keeps two guinea pigs as pets."I'm not complaining about being homeless," Garza said. "The winters are cold, the summers are hot, constant noise. That's why we were back up there, because it's quieter," he said, pointing to a cluster of trees and bushes set against the side of the freeway.Now a fence blocks his path. "Right here," he said, "everything echoes."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 59/79   Airline Food Waste Is a Problem. Can Banana Leaves Be Part of the Solution?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    From disposable headphones and plastic cutlery to food scraps and toilet waste, the average airline passenger leaves behind over 3 pounds of garbage, according to one estimate. To get travelers and airlines thinking -- and talking -- about that rather large pile of trash, a British design firm has refashioned the economy meal tray, replacing plastic with renewable materials such as coffee grounds, banana leaves and coconut wood.Jo Rowan is the associate strategy director of the firm, PriestmanGoode, which has spent more than two decades applying design thinking to the air travel experience, including airport lounges and cabin seating.Now, she said, the firm is turning its attention to the less

    From disposable headphones and plastic cutlery to food scraps and toilet waste, the average airline passenger leaves behind over 3 pounds of garbage, according to one estimate. To get travelers and airlines thinking -- and talking -- about that rather large pile of trash, a British design firm has refashioned the economy meal tray, replacing plastic with renewable materials such as coffee grounds, banana leaves and coconut wood.Jo Rowan is the associate strategy director of the firm, PriestmanGoode, which has spent more than two decades applying design thinking to the air travel experience, including airport lounges and cabin seating.Now, she said, the firm is turning its attention to the less "glamorous" side of things."Onboard waste is a big issue," she said. "Knowing that you have 4 billion passengers per year, it all adds up very quickly."The redesigned items are featured in an exhibit, "Get Onboard: Reduce.Reuse.Rethink," that opened last month at the Design Museum in London.By far the biggest environmental issue with air travel -- and the reason 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg opted to sail to New York from Europe in August, rather than fly -- is the associated carbon emissions, which are growing at a faster rate than predicted in previous, already dire projections.But as air travel becomes increasingly accessible, and as more people take to the skies, airlines have been making public pledges to curb their environmental footprints, including the plastic forks and leftovers their passengers leave behind.How much trash are we talking about?Because there is no central authority tracking statistics about the amount of waste produced on flights, accurate and recent figures are hard to come by. But the International Air Transport Association, a trade group representing about 300 airlines, conducted a small study at Heathrow Airport in London and estimated that airlines generated about 6.7 million tons of cabin waste last year.As low-cost airlines proliferate, and as the tourism industry continues to court middle-class customers, that number could double in the next decade."It's a relatively limited sample at this stage," Chris Goater, a spokesman for the trade association, said.Pere Fullana i Palmer, director of the UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, a research group based in Barcelona, Spain, has taken an even deeper dive into the issue of airline trash."You cannot improve a system if you don't know it," he said.Fullana i Palmer's research group teamed up with Iberia Airlines, Gate Gourmet, Ferrovial and Ecoembes to analyze approximately 8,400 pounds of garbage on 145 flights into Madrid. The group found that 33% was food waste, 28% was cardboard and paper waste, and about 12% was plastic.How can this be fixed?As consumers become increasingly conscious of the outsize environmental impact of air travel, airlines are under growing pressure to take action.Alaska Airlines, Ryanair and British Airways have made public declarations to reduce waste, and Air France said it would eliminate 210 million single-use plastic items like cups and stirring sticks by the end of this year.On one Qantas flight in May, which the company called "the first-ever commercial flight to produce no landfill waste," the airline removed individually packaged servings of milk and Vegemite, and served meals in containers made from sugar cane, with utensils made of crop starch.A month later, on a flight from Chicago to Los Angeles, United Airlines served meals using "fully recyclable or compostable serviceware."But replicating such innovations on a meaningful scale will be tricky. Regular flights are not equipped with the necessary facilities or systems for attendants to manage recycled goods, according to Megan Epler Wood, the author of "Sustainable Tourism on a Finite Planet" and the director of Harvard's International Sustainable Tourism Initiative. (On a recent trip, Wood said, she saw a flight attendant separating recyclables with her bare hands.)The solution, she said, would require collaboration among airlines, local authorities and airports, which are ultimately responsible for handling and hauling trash.IATA, the airline trade association, said the rules governing international catering waste -- which involve a complex set of international and country-specific regulations meant to prevent the spread of disease -- should be reconsidered to increase recycling rates.While all cabin waste is subject to the regulations of the country in which the plane lands, some European countries, as well as Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, have imposed additional measures to protect agriculture. This means that even untouched food and drink, which, according to IATA estimates, makes up about 20% of total airline waste, ends up in landfills or is incinerated.The regulations governing single-use plastic, which will be banned in the European Union by 2021, also present challenges, according to the trade association."We've developed a lot of guidance to airlines to deal with the issue of cabin waste," Michael Gill, IATA's director of aviation environment, said. "But airlines cannot solve the issue on their own.""Its vital regulators understand the full impacts," he continued, "including increased energy and water use, as well as CO? emissions that result from heavier materials carried on board."Fullana i Palmer agreed that legislation permitting more materials to be recycled or turned into biogas was needed but said that change was possible."I am optimistic because there is a big push for saving our planet," he said. "The tsunami is so strong that all sectors will have to adapt."The airline meal, reimaginedIn designing the onboard items, PriestmanGoode was conscious of heft because the more weight on an aircraft, the higher the fuel emissions. The tray is made of coffee grounds and husks (also a coffee byproduct). The dishes are made of pressed wheat bran, and a single spork made of coconut palm wood, a waste product that farmers would otherwise burn, replaces plastic cutlery."If you picked it up, you wouldn't know it wasn't plastic," Rowan said. "Part of what we were trying to do was actually look at how we could make this a desirable product, as well as being sustainable."The team also played with lids of dishes, which are typically made of transparent plastic, to signify what's inside: a pressed banana leaf for salads and side dishes, an edible waffle cone for dessert.The goal, Rowan said, is "getting people to think about the way that they travel and also getting airlines and the service providers to think about what they offer."Rowan said airlines and suppliers had shown interest in the products, which, for now, are available only at the museum through February."We're moving this on to the next level of development," she said, to "get some of these things to fly."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 60/79   Ecuador indigenous, president open talks over protests
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    President Lenín Moreno and leaders of Ecuador's indigenous peoples sat down Sunday evening to a nationally broadcast negotiating session aimed at defusing nearly two weeks of protests that have paralyzed the economy and left seven dead and hundreds injured in clashes with police.  Sitting around a U-shaped table, Moreno and indigenous leaders took turns laying out their positions in talks mediated by the United Nations' chief representative in Ecuador and broadcast live online and on national TV.  Wearing the feathered headdress and face paint of the Achuar people of the Amazon rain forest, the president of the Confederation of Indigenous Nations, Jaime Vargas, demanded the immediate cancellation of Moreno's Oct. 1 decree ending fuel subsidies as part of an International Monetary Fund austerity package.

    President Lenín Moreno and leaders of Ecuador's indigenous peoples sat down Sunday evening to a nationally broadcast negotiating session aimed at defusing nearly two weeks of protests that have paralyzed the economy and left seven dead and hundreds injured in clashes with police. Sitting around a U-shaped table, Moreno and indigenous leaders took turns laying out their positions in talks mediated by the United Nations' chief representative in Ecuador and broadcast live online and on national TV. Wearing the feathered headdress and face paint of the Achuar people of the Amazon rain forest, the president of the Confederation of Indigenous Nations, Jaime Vargas, demanded the immediate cancellation of Moreno's Oct. 1 decree ending fuel subsidies as part of an International Monetary Fund austerity package.


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  • 61/79   The Latest: Syrian Kurds ally with Damascus in major shift
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Syrian Kurdish officials say they will work with the country's central government in Damascus to fend off Turkey's offensive against Kurdish fighters.  In a major shift of alliance, Kurdish-led forces are to deploy side by side with government troops along the northern Syrian border.  Sunday's announcement came hours after U.S. officials said American troops will leave northern Syria.

    Syrian Kurdish officials say they will work with the country's central government in Damascus to fend off Turkey's offensive against Kurdish fighters. In a major shift of alliance, Kurdish-led forces are to deploy side by side with government troops along the northern Syrian border. Sunday's announcement came hours after U.S. officials said American troops will leave northern Syria.


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  • 62/79   The U.S. Spoiled a Deal That Might Have Saved the Kurds, Former Top Official Says
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Ismail Coskun/APABU DHABI—Abandoned by the Americans, their former allies, Syria’s Kurds reportedly are allowing troops from the Assad regime to enter territory they had under their control. The Kurds also are putting out feelers to Russia for support against an onslaught by Turkish troops and Turkish-supported militias.A return of Bashar al-Assad’s forces to northeastern Syria for the first time in seven years would make visible the end to the bitter, controversial U.S. mission there against the so-called Islamic State. That’s not because of any concerted decision to withdraw by President Trump, whose antiwar rhetoric obscured his vacillation about leaving. It’s because Assad will deny his American adversary the room to operate that the Syrian Kurds had provided their deceitful American partners. “We know that we would have to make painful compromises with Moscow and Bashar al-Assad if we go down the road of working with them,” the Kurdish commander of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) wrote in an op-ed published Sunday in Foreign Policy. “But if we have to choose between compromises and the genocide of our people, we will surely choose life for our people.”More in sorrow than in anger, the commander, Mazloum Abdi, wrote, “When the whole world failed to support us, the United States extended its hands. We shook hands and appreciated its generous support.”But under Turkish pressure, at Washington’s request, the Kurds “agreed to withdraw our heavy weapons from the border area with Turkey, destroy our defensive fortifications, and pull back our most seasoned fighters. Turkey would never attack us so long as the U.S. government was true to its word with us.”Or so they believed. “We are now standing with our chests bare to face the Turkish knives,” Mazloum wrote.Brett McGurk, who resigned as the presidential special envoy to the coalition against ISIS last December, told The Daily Beast on Sunday that such a move by the Syrian Kurds was predictable under the circumstances. Even last year, when McGurk was still serving, Kurdish leaders in Syria were telling the Americans that if support for them and deterrence against a Turkish attack was not going to continue, they needed to make a deal with the Assad regime and Russia for protection. “We have given our road map to the Russians. We are just waiting on a decision,” one senior Kurdish official told The Washington Post.McGurk said he supported that idea at a time when Trump already was talking about pulling out of Syria, but he met firm opposition within the administration. (Special Representative for Syria Engagement Jim Jeffrey, for one, “told the Kurds on multiple occasions, ‘we’ll manage Turkey, don’t make a deal with the [Assad] regime,’” according to a source familiar with the matter.) Then-National Security Adviser John Bolton and crew insisted the U.S. must stay in Syria until Iran was out, or at least on its way. (Representatives for Bolton, whom Trump fired last month, did not immediately reply to a request for comment. Neither did State Department spokespeople.)Since McGurk’s resignation, he has stayed in touch with the members of the SDF and some contacts in the U.S. departments of state and defense. He says the Kurds asked repeatedly if the support and protection of the United States could be relied upon, and they were told repeatedly that the Americans had their backs. But that was not the case. McGurk told the Beirut Institute Summit in Abu Dhabi that when the Russians first got heavily involved in Syria in 2016, an oft repeated truism about Kremlin duplicity was “Everybody knows not to get into a well with a Russian rope.”“But now what I hear,” McGurk told the audience, “is that nobody should get into a well with an American rope.”In other words, once it became clear in 2018 that Trump was hostile to the open-ended U.S. presence in Syria he inherited, the Kurds had options to help ease the end of their relationship with the Americans. But Trump’s State Department and Pentagon, unwilling to face up to a final withdrawal—and the unequivocal loss of U.S. influence in a part of the Middle East where it is increasingly impotent, if not irrelevant—convinced the Kurds not to plan for an American departure. Had the Kurds done so, their new Russian and Syrian partners might have been able to spare them the devastation that Turkey is now wreaking as the U.S. pulls back and stands by. And now that the slaughter has begun, Mazloum has made clear that his forces and his people have no choice but to look to Russia and Damascus for support. Unfortunately for the Kurds, as McGurk points out, after Trump’s betrayal dramatically weakened their position, when they call the Russians or the Syrian regime it’s not clear that anyone is picking up the phone.Meanwhile, mass escapes of ISIS prisoners and alleged war crimes by Turkish-backed militia members in northeast Syria reflected the mounting chaos as Ankara drives ahead with an assault that already is deeper into Syria than originally announced.“I think we are likely to see a significant comeback by ISIS,” McGurk told the audience in Abu Dhabi. In Washington and in the field, confusion among the Americans is rampant. Ever since last Sunday’s phone call between Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the administration has aggressively insisted that its green light to Erdogan, complete with a presidential invitation to the White House next month, was really a red light.Trump Says U.S. Troops Have Quit Syria. It’s Not True.On Sunday, Defense Secretary Mark Esper told CBS, “Look, it's a very terrible situation over there. A situation caused by the Turks, by President Erdo?an. Despite our opposition they decided to make this incursion into Syria.” Trump has escalated his rhetoric about the generation-long disaster of the U.S. military in the Mideast, but he has still yet to withdraw from Syria–and has in fact deployed 14,000 new troops to the Gulf region in the past six months. Incoherence, deceit and betrayal are now the most conspicuous characteristics of U.S. policy. Esper said that because the Kurds are looking to cut a deal if you will with the Syrians and the Russians to counter-attack against the Turks in the north, American troops could find themselves “caught between two opposing advancing armies and it's a very untenable situation. So I spoke with the president last night after discussions with the rest of the national security team and he directed that we begin a deliberate withdrawal of forces from northern Syria.”But as it dawns on Trump that his “end endless wars” mantra could ignite a new endless war, he is reluctant to carry out a full troop withdrawal. Esper spoke about withdrawing from “northern Syria” two days after he and Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, insisted there were “no additional changes to our force posture.” Two knowledgeable U.S. officials told The Daily Beast that the U.S. planned to remain in Syria, just further away from the Turkish fighting positions. Some undisclosed hundreds of the 1,000 U.S. forces currently in Syria will indeed leave the country—for elsewhere in the Mideast, however, not home. U.S. ‘Withdraws’ as Kurds Strike Deal to Let Assad's Forces Into RegionBut all of that improvisation, the consequence of senior officials attempting to salvage something after the Trump-Erdogan accord, may now be overtaken by events. Assad’s forces are unlikely to permit continued U.S. operations. The end of a war never declared by Congress may come not by American decision, let alone negotiation, but by American adversaries seizing the initiative that Trump has been comfortable abandoning. Already reports are coming in from Syria of ISIS fighters breaking out of their Kurdish detention facilities as the Kurds fight for their lives. According to the New York Times, the rapid pullback, sometimes under fire from their Turkish NATO ally, has cost the Americans their plans to move a handful of senior ISIS detainees to U.S. military custody in neighboring Iraq. All of it raises the prospect of ISIS grabbing victory – meaning a new lease on life – out of the jaws of defeat after the Kurds, sponsored by the U.S., finished off the Caliphate in 2018.Meanwhile leaders in the Middle East are trying to come to terms with the fact that the Americans have proved to be fatally unreliable allies.Hoshyar Zebari, the former deputy prime minister and foreign minister of Iraq, told the Beirut Institute Summit in Abu Dhabi that in the Syrian war, “The Russians did not walk away from their partners. The Iranians did not walk away from their partners. But the Americans did.”“Definitely the Turks will be emboldened,” Zebari told The Daily Beast. “We expect about 50,000 refugees to cross the border,” he said, mostly into the Kurdish region of Iraq.  Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Ismail Coskun/APABU DHABI—Abandoned by the Americans, their former allies, Syria’s Kurds reportedly are allowing troops from the Assad regime to enter territory they had under their control. The Kurds also are putting out feelers to Russia for support against an onslaught by Turkish troops and Turkish-supported militias.A return of Bashar al-Assad’s forces to northeastern Syria for the first time in seven years would make visible the end to the bitter, controversial U.S. mission there against the so-called Islamic State. That’s not because of any concerted decision to withdraw by President Trump, whose antiwar rhetoric obscured his vacillation about leaving. It’s because Assad will deny his American adversary the room to operate that the Syrian Kurds had provided their deceitful American partners. “We know that we would have to make painful compromises with Moscow and Bashar al-Assad if we go down the road of working with them,” the Kurdish commander of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) wrote in an op-ed published Sunday in Foreign Policy. “But if we have to choose between compromises and the genocide of our people, we will surely choose life for our people.”More in sorrow than in anger, the commander, Mazloum Abdi, wrote, “When the whole world failed to support us, the United States extended its hands. We shook hands and appreciated its generous support.”But under Turkish pressure, at Washington’s request, the Kurds “agreed to withdraw our heavy weapons from the border area with Turkey, destroy our defensive fortifications, and pull back our most seasoned fighters. Turkey would never attack us so long as the U.S. government was true to its word with us.”Or so they believed. “We are now standing with our chests bare to face the Turkish knives,” Mazloum wrote.Brett McGurk, who resigned as the presidential special envoy to the coalition against ISIS last December, told The Daily Beast on Sunday that such a move by the Syrian Kurds was predictable under the circumstances. Even last year, when McGurk was still serving, Kurdish leaders in Syria were telling the Americans that if support for them and deterrence against a Turkish attack was not going to continue, they needed to make a deal with the Assad regime and Russia for protection. “We have given our road map to the Russians. We are just waiting on a decision,” one senior Kurdish official told The Washington Post.McGurk said he supported that idea at a time when Trump already was talking about pulling out of Syria, but he met firm opposition within the administration. (Special Representative for Syria Engagement Jim Jeffrey, for one, “told the Kurds on multiple occasions, ‘we’ll manage Turkey, don’t make a deal with the [Assad] regime,’” according to a source familiar with the matter.) Then-National Security Adviser John Bolton and crew insisted the U.S. must stay in Syria until Iran was out, or at least on its way. (Representatives for Bolton, whom Trump fired last month, did not immediately reply to a request for comment. Neither did State Department spokespeople.)Since McGurk’s resignation, he has stayed in touch with the members of the SDF and some contacts in the U.S. departments of state and defense. He says the Kurds asked repeatedly if the support and protection of the United States could be relied upon, and they were told repeatedly that the Americans had their backs. But that was not the case. McGurk told the Beirut Institute Summit in Abu Dhabi that when the Russians first got heavily involved in Syria in 2016, an oft repeated truism about Kremlin duplicity was “Everybody knows not to get into a well with a Russian rope.”“But now what I hear,” McGurk told the audience, “is that nobody should get into a well with an American rope.”In other words, once it became clear in 2018 that Trump was hostile to the open-ended U.S. presence in Syria he inherited, the Kurds had options to help ease the end of their relationship with the Americans. But Trump’s State Department and Pentagon, unwilling to face up to a final withdrawal—and the unequivocal loss of U.S. influence in a part of the Middle East where it is increasingly impotent, if not irrelevant—convinced the Kurds not to plan for an American departure. Had the Kurds done so, their new Russian and Syrian partners might have been able to spare them the devastation that Turkey is now wreaking as the U.S. pulls back and stands by. And now that the slaughter has begun, Mazloum has made clear that his forces and his people have no choice but to look to Russia and Damascus for support. Unfortunately for the Kurds, as McGurk points out, after Trump’s betrayal dramatically weakened their position, when they call the Russians or the Syrian regime it’s not clear that anyone is picking up the phone.Meanwhile, mass escapes of ISIS prisoners and alleged war crimes by Turkish-backed militia members in northeast Syria reflected the mounting chaos as Ankara drives ahead with an assault that already is deeper into Syria than originally announced.“I think we are likely to see a significant comeback by ISIS,” McGurk told the audience in Abu Dhabi. In Washington and in the field, confusion among the Americans is rampant. Ever since last Sunday’s phone call between Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the administration has aggressively insisted that its green light to Erdogan, complete with a presidential invitation to the White House next month, was really a red light.Trump Says U.S. Troops Have Quit Syria. It’s Not True.On Sunday, Defense Secretary Mark Esper told CBS, “Look, it's a very terrible situation over there. A situation caused by the Turks, by President Erdo?an. Despite our opposition they decided to make this incursion into Syria.” Trump has escalated his rhetoric about the generation-long disaster of the U.S. military in the Mideast, but he has still yet to withdraw from Syria–and has in fact deployed 14,000 new troops to the Gulf region in the past six months. Incoherence, deceit and betrayal are now the most conspicuous characteristics of U.S. policy. Esper said that because the Kurds are looking to cut a deal if you will with the Syrians and the Russians to counter-attack against the Turks in the north, American troops could find themselves “caught between two opposing advancing armies and it's a very untenable situation. So I spoke with the president last night after discussions with the rest of the national security team and he directed that we begin a deliberate withdrawal of forces from northern Syria.”But as it dawns on Trump that his “end endless wars” mantra could ignite a new endless war, he is reluctant to carry out a full troop withdrawal. Esper spoke about withdrawing from “northern Syria” two days after he and Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, insisted there were “no additional changes to our force posture.” Two knowledgeable U.S. officials told The Daily Beast that the U.S. planned to remain in Syria, just further away from the Turkish fighting positions. Some undisclosed hundreds of the 1,000 U.S. forces currently in Syria will indeed leave the country—for elsewhere in the Mideast, however, not home. U.S. ‘Withdraws’ as Kurds Strike Deal to Let Assad's Forces Into RegionBut all of that improvisation, the consequence of senior officials attempting to salvage something after the Trump-Erdogan accord, may now be overtaken by events. Assad’s forces are unlikely to permit continued U.S. operations. The end of a war never declared by Congress may come not by American decision, let alone negotiation, but by American adversaries seizing the initiative that Trump has been comfortable abandoning. Already reports are coming in from Syria of ISIS fighters breaking out of their Kurdish detention facilities as the Kurds fight for their lives. According to the New York Times, the rapid pullback, sometimes under fire from their Turkish NATO ally, has cost the Americans their plans to move a handful of senior ISIS detainees to U.S. military custody in neighboring Iraq. All of it raises the prospect of ISIS grabbing victory – meaning a new lease on life – out of the jaws of defeat after the Kurds, sponsored by the U.S., finished off the Caliphate in 2018.Meanwhile leaders in the Middle East are trying to come to terms with the fact that the Americans have proved to be fatally unreliable allies.Hoshyar Zebari, the former deputy prime minister and foreign minister of Iraq, told the Beirut Institute Summit in Abu Dhabi that in the Syrian war, “The Russians did not walk away from their partners. The Iranians did not walk away from their partners. But the Americans did.”“Definitely the Turks will be emboldened,” Zebari told The Daily Beast. “We expect about 50,000 refugees to cross the border,” he said, mostly into the Kurdish region of Iraq.  Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 63/79   Syria's Kurds look to Assad for protection after US pullout
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Syria's Kurds said Syrian government forces agreed Sunday to help them fend off Turkey's invasion — a major shift in alliances that came after President Donald Trump ordered all U.S. troops withdrawn from the northern border area amid the rapidly deepening chaos.  The shift could lead to clashes between Turkey and Syria and raises the specter of a resurgent Islamic State group as the U.S. relinquishes any remaining influence in northern Syria to President Bashar Assad and his chief backer, Russia.

    Syria's Kurds said Syrian government forces agreed Sunday to help them fend off Turkey's invasion — a major shift in alliances that came after President Donald Trump ordered all U.S. troops withdrawn from the northern border area amid the rapidly deepening chaos. The shift could lead to clashes between Turkey and Syria and raises the specter of a resurgent Islamic State group as the U.S. relinquishes any remaining influence in northern Syria to President Bashar Assad and his chief backer, Russia.


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  • 64/79   With Hypersonic Missiles, Israel's F-35s Are Upping The Ante In Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran has taken notice.

    Iran has taken notice.


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  • 65/79   Pompeo suggests reporter 'working for Democrats' after impeachment grilling
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Titans of American journalism Rather and Mitchell join praise of Nancy Amons after Nashville reporter stuns secretary of state  * Opinion: Rudy Giuliani is Donald Trump’s real secretary of stateSecretary of state Mike Pompeo. Photograph: Pablo Martínez Monsiváis/APSecretary of state Mike Pompeo suffered embarrassment from an unexpected quarter on Friday, as an interview with a local TV reporter in Nashville, Tennessee, produced not softball platitudes but hardball questions about the impeachment inquiry.“It sounds like you’re working, at least in part, for the Democratic National Committee,” the flustered diplomat said as he was pressed over Donald Trump’s attempts to have Ukraine investigate a political rival.Pompeo was in Nashville to give a speech to a Christian group about religious freedom, a priority of the Trump administration. WSMV, an NBC affiliate, reported that he told his audience it was “a heck of a day not to be in Washington”.WSMV reporter Nancy Amons was determined not to give him a break.Saying she would “start right away with the tough stuff, as you know”, Amons asked about a key issue in the Ukraine scandal: the removal of the US ambassador, Marie Yovanovitch, who was testifying to House members on Friday, and the resignation of Michael McKinley, a close aide to Pompeo.“Well, ma’am, you have some of your facts wrong, so you should be careful about things you assert as facts before you state them,” Pompeo said.“But more importantly, I’m incredibly proud of the work that I’ve done along with my team, other senior leaders at the state department, to make sure that this institution was functional, preserved and delivering on behalf of America.”Pressed, Pompeo repeated that he did not talk about personnel matters as “it wouldn’t be appropriate, ma’am, to do that”. He appreciated the question “a great deal”, he said, but would not answer it.With Pompeo’s irritation increasingly visible, Amons asked if he had met Rudy Giuliani on a visit to Warsaw this year.The former New York mayor is commonly described as Donald Trump’s personal lawyer although it is not clear what legal work he might do for the president.As the impeachment inquiry proceeds, Giuliani is under scrutiny regarding extra-governmental efforts to promote conspiracy theories about Ukraine and to persuade President Vlodimyr Zelinskiy to investigate unproven allegations of corruption against Hunter Biden, the son of former vice-president Joe Biden.Two Soviet-born associates of Giuliani were arrested this week on campaign finance charges. Giuliani himself is reportedly under investigation by federal prosecutors in Manhattan.Pompeo chose three times not to answer Amons’ question, instead offering grim-faced variations on a theme: that he went to Warsaw to work on “an important mission … to take down the world’s largest state sponsor of terror, the Islamic Republic of Iran” and it was the “only thing I engaged in while I was there”.“It sounds like you’re not going to say,” Amons said.She then asked about text messages between US diplomats, obtained by House Democrats, which show concern that Trump was making the US-Ukraine relationship contingent on help with investigating the Bidens.“Were you aware that this was happening?” she asked.“You’ve got your facts wrong,” Pompeo said. “It sounds like you’re working, at least in part, for the Democratic National Committee when you phrase the predicate of a question in that way.“It’s unfortunate and it does a real disservice to the employees and the team at the United States Department of State. Our team was incredibly focused, we wanted a good relationship with Ukraine.”Amons also asked about the situation in Syria, where Trump’s decision to pull US troops away from the border with Turkey has given a green light to an incursion by Turkish forces opposed to Kurdish groups long allied to the US.Civilian casualties and possible war crimes have been reported. The United Nations said on Sunday 130,000 people have been displaced. Nashville is home to a sizeable Kurdish American community, some of whom told the Guardian this week of their sense of betrayal by the US government. Amons asked the secretary of state what he would say to them.“So the United States under President Trump did enormous work to support the Kurds in taking down the [Islamic State] in predominantly Kurdish regions of Syria,” Pompeo said.Asked “for the Kurds who are here in Nashville, do you see why they are so worried”, he said: “We’ve been incredibly supportive and we will continue to support them.”The interview drew praise from some titans of American journalism, among them Andrea Mitchell and Dan Rather, who Amons thanked on Twitter.She also thanked her team and wrote: “Being prepared is crucial, and listening – things I learned through many years of workshops with Investigative Reporters and Editors, a great non-profit for journalists.”Asked about Pompeo’s evident irritation with her questions, she wrote: “No, I never felt unsafe. I think he liked me less at the end though than at the beginning.”

    Titans of American journalism Rather and Mitchell join praise of Nancy Amons after Nashville reporter stuns secretary of state * Opinion: Rudy Giuliani is Donald Trump’s real secretary of stateSecretary of state Mike Pompeo. Photograph: Pablo Martínez Monsiváis/APSecretary of state Mike Pompeo suffered embarrassment from an unexpected quarter on Friday, as an interview with a local TV reporter in Nashville, Tennessee, produced not softball platitudes but hardball questions about the impeachment inquiry.“It sounds like you’re working, at least in part, for the Democratic National Committee,” the flustered diplomat said as he was pressed over Donald Trump’s attempts to have Ukraine investigate a political rival.Pompeo was in Nashville to give a speech to a Christian group about religious freedom, a priority of the Trump administration. WSMV, an NBC affiliate, reported that he told his audience it was “a heck of a day not to be in Washington”.WSMV reporter Nancy Amons was determined not to give him a break.Saying she would “start right away with the tough stuff, as you know”, Amons asked about a key issue in the Ukraine scandal: the removal of the US ambassador, Marie Yovanovitch, who was testifying to House members on Friday, and the resignation of Michael McKinley, a close aide to Pompeo.“Well, ma’am, you have some of your facts wrong, so you should be careful about things you assert as facts before you state them,” Pompeo said.“But more importantly, I’m incredibly proud of the work that I’ve done along with my team, other senior leaders at the state department, to make sure that this institution was functional, preserved and delivering on behalf of America.”Pressed, Pompeo repeated that he did not talk about personnel matters as “it wouldn’t be appropriate, ma’am, to do that”. He appreciated the question “a great deal”, he said, but would not answer it.With Pompeo’s irritation increasingly visible, Amons asked if he had met Rudy Giuliani on a visit to Warsaw this year.The former New York mayor is commonly described as Donald Trump’s personal lawyer although it is not clear what legal work he might do for the president.As the impeachment inquiry proceeds, Giuliani is under scrutiny regarding extra-governmental efforts to promote conspiracy theories about Ukraine and to persuade President Vlodimyr Zelinskiy to investigate unproven allegations of corruption against Hunter Biden, the son of former vice-president Joe Biden.Two Soviet-born associates of Giuliani were arrested this week on campaign finance charges. Giuliani himself is reportedly under investigation by federal prosecutors in Manhattan.Pompeo chose three times not to answer Amons’ question, instead offering grim-faced variations on a theme: that he went to Warsaw to work on “an important mission … to take down the world’s largest state sponsor of terror, the Islamic Republic of Iran” and it was the “only thing I engaged in while I was there”.“It sounds like you’re not going to say,” Amons said.She then asked about text messages between US diplomats, obtained by House Democrats, which show concern that Trump was making the US-Ukraine relationship contingent on help with investigating the Bidens.“Were you aware that this was happening?” she asked.“You’ve got your facts wrong,” Pompeo said. “It sounds like you’re working, at least in part, for the Democratic National Committee when you phrase the predicate of a question in that way.“It’s unfortunate and it does a real disservice to the employees and the team at the United States Department of State. Our team was incredibly focused, we wanted a good relationship with Ukraine.”Amons also asked about the situation in Syria, where Trump’s decision to pull US troops away from the border with Turkey has given a green light to an incursion by Turkish forces opposed to Kurdish groups long allied to the US.Civilian casualties and possible war crimes have been reported. The United Nations said on Sunday 130,000 people have been displaced. Nashville is home to a sizeable Kurdish American community, some of whom told the Guardian this week of their sense of betrayal by the US government. Amons asked the secretary of state what he would say to them.“So the United States under President Trump did enormous work to support the Kurds in taking down the [Islamic State] in predominantly Kurdish regions of Syria,” Pompeo said.Asked “for the Kurds who are here in Nashville, do you see why they are so worried”, he said: “We’ve been incredibly supportive and we will continue to support them.”The interview drew praise from some titans of American journalism, among them Andrea Mitchell and Dan Rather, who Amons thanked on Twitter.She also thanked her team and wrote: “Being prepared is crucial, and listening – things I learned through many years of workshops with Investigative Reporters and Editors, a great non-profit for journalists.”Asked about Pompeo’s evident irritation with her questions, she wrote: “No, I never felt unsafe. I think he liked me less at the end though than at the beginning.”


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  • 66/79   US pulling out of northern Syria; full withdrawal possible
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The United States appears to be heading toward a full military withdrawal from Syria amid growing chaos , cries of betrayal and signs that Turkey's invasion could fuel a broader war.  Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Sunday that President Donald Trump had directed U.S. troops in northern Syria to begin pulling out 'as safely and quickly as possible.' He did not say Trump ordered troops to leave Syria, but that seemed like the next step in a combat zone growing more unstable by the hour.  Esper, interviewed on two TV news shows, said the administration was considering its options.

    The United States appears to be heading toward a full military withdrawal from Syria amid growing chaos , cries of betrayal and signs that Turkey's invasion could fuel a broader war. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Sunday that President Donald Trump had directed U.S. troops in northern Syria to begin pulling out 'as safely and quickly as possible.' He did not say Trump ordered troops to leave Syria, but that seemed like the next step in a combat zone growing more unstable by the hour. Esper, interviewed on two TV news shows, said the administration was considering its options.


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  • 67/79   No sign of Brexit breakthrough with time running out
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    British and European negotiators on Sunday played down hopes of a rapid breakthrough in their last-ditch bid to strike an amicable Brexit divorce deal.  Intense talks continue in Brussels, but European diplomats say the two sides are still far apart on how to manage trade and customs on the island of Ireland.

    British and European negotiators on Sunday played down hopes of a rapid breakthrough in their last-ditch bid to strike an amicable Brexit divorce deal. Intense talks continue in Brussels, but European diplomats say the two sides are still far apart on how to manage trade and customs on the island of Ireland.


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  • 68/79   Macron, Merkel call for end to Turkish offensive in Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The leaders of France and Germany called Sunday for an end to Turkey's offensive against Kurds in northern Syria, warning of dire humanitarian consequences and a boost for the Islamic State group.  Emmanuel Macron hosted Angela Merkel in Paris for a working dinner amid turmoil stirred up by Ankara's attack and Britain's pending exit from the European Union, both issues on the leaders' agenda.

    The leaders of France and Germany called Sunday for an end to Turkey's offensive against Kurds in northern Syria, warning of dire humanitarian consequences and a boost for the Islamic State group. Emmanuel Macron hosted Angela Merkel in Paris for a working dinner amid turmoil stirred up by Ankara's attack and Britain's pending exit from the European Union, both issues on the leaders' agenda.


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  • 69/79   Russia will work with Saudi to stabilise oil market: Putin
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Russia will work with Saudi Arabia against any 'attempt to destabilise' the oil market, President Vladimir Putin said in an interview broadcast Sunday, on the eve of a visit to Riyadh.  Tensions in the region are high following attacks on oil installations in Saudi Arabia, which sent prices surging, and the seizure of tankers in the Gulf.  'If anyone believes that acts such as the seizing of tankers or strikes against oil infrastructure could in any way affect the cooperation between Russia and our Arab friends... they are very wrong,' Putin said.

    Russia will work with Saudi Arabia against any 'attempt to destabilise' the oil market, President Vladimir Putin said in an interview broadcast Sunday, on the eve of a visit to Riyadh. Tensions in the region are high following attacks on oil installations in Saudi Arabia, which sent prices surging, and the seizure of tankers in the Gulf. 'If anyone believes that acts such as the seizing of tankers or strikes against oil infrastructure could in any way affect the cooperation between Russia and our Arab friends... they are very wrong,' Putin said.


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  • 70/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
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    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 71/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
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    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 72/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
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    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 73/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 74/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
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    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 75/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
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    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 76/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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  • 77/79   Will Your Health Insurance Cover You Overseas?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...


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  • 78/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 79/79   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...


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